Sutil nears second Force India seat

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As the calendar nears March, and the season-opening Australian Grand Prix is barely more than two weeks away, Force India’s second seat hasn’t been officially confirmed. However, as of Wednesday night, the fight between the two main contenders is close to an end.

Adrian Sutil, a veteran of five Formula 1 seasons (right), and Jules Bianchi, a would-be rookie who served as Force India’s third driver last year, are the two fighting for the final open seat on the grid.

Late Wednesday night, Autosport reported Sutil had beaten Bianchi to the seat. Both have tested for the team this offseason. As NBC’s Formula 1 pit reporter Will Buxton noted yesterday, Sutil has gained vital perspective from a year out of the sport.

Sutil’s second chance would come after legal issues a year ago that stemmed from assault charges that occurred in a nightclub after the 2011 Chinese Grand Prix. Reportedly, he has been cleared to travel for the entirety of the schedule.

He spent five years with the team from 2007 through 2011, making his debut when it was still called Spyker before Vijay Mallya and Force India took over from 2008. His best finish in that time was fourth at the 2009 Italian Grand Prix, a race he qualified a career-best second and set the fastest race lap.

Bianchi ran in nine Friday free practice sessions last year. The Frenchman spent two seasons in GP2 before switching to the World Series by Renault last season, where he finished second in the championship and barely missed the title.

It’s rare this late in the game that a seat is still up for grabs. There have been some eleventh hour changes – Vitaly Petrov replaced Jarno Trulli at Caterham in mid-February a year ago, for example – but ordinarily all the seats are booked with testing fully underway.

Sutil would be the fourth German driver of the 22 on the grid, joining three-time defending champion Sebastian Vettel, Mercedes’ Nico Rosberg and Sauber’s Nico Hulkenberg.

Incidentally, it’s Hulkenberg whom Sutil would replace, after the opposite happened last year. The move would mean a repeat of the Sutil-Paul di Resta pairing in 2011.

Have a decent tax refund coming? Buy Ayrton Senna’s 1993 Monaco-winning car

Photos courtesy Bonhams
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Are you expecting a better than normal tax refund? Did you get a very nice bonus from your company due to the new tax cut?

Well, if you have a good chunk of change hanging around and potentially can be in Monaco on May 11, you can have a chance to bid on the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A that the late Ayrton Senna drove in — and won — that year’s Monaco Grand Prix.

We’re not just talking about any race winner. It’s also the same car Senna won his sixth Monaco Grand Prix, and the chassis bears the number six.

It’s also the same car Senna piloted to that season’s F1 championship (his third and final title before sadly being killed the next year) and is the first McLaren driven by Senna that’s ever been sold or put up for auction.

The famed Bonhams auction house is overseeing the sale of the car.

“Any Grand Prix-winning car is important, but to have the golden combination of both Senna and Monaco is a seriously rare privilege indeed,” Bonhams global head of motorsport, Mark Osborne, told The Robb Report.

“Senna and Monaco are historically intertwined, and this car represents the culmination of his achievements at the Monegasque track. This is one of the most significant Grand Prix cars ever to appear at auction, and is certainly the most significant Grand Prix car to be offered since the Fangio Mercedes-Benz W196R, which sold for a world record at auction.”

How much might you need? You might want to get a couple of friends to throw in a few bucks as well.

“We expect the car to achieve a considerable seven-figure sum,” Osborne said.

The London newspaper “The Telegraph” predicts the car will sell in the $6.1 million range.”

“This car will set the world record for a Senna car at auction,” Osborne said. “We are as certain as you can be in the auction world.”

While you won’t be able to take the car for a test drive before the auction, it’ll be ready to roar once you pay the price.

“In theory, the buyer could be racing immediately upon receipt of the cleared funds after the auction,” Osborne said. “All systems are primed and ready.”