The mystery of Red Bull’s testing pace

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Are Red Bull in trouble or just keeping their cards close to their chest?

Their quickest time over the combined eight days of testing at the Circuit de Catalunya ranked seventh-quickest of the eleven teams. Just Williams, Caterham, Marussia and Toro Rosso were slower.

Red Bull usually play a cagey game in testing and this year they took that to even greater lengths. Three consecutive championship doubles mean their rivals scrutinize every move they make, especially at this critical time of the season.

When the RB9 ventured out onto the track in Spain the Red Bull mechanics awaited its return with screen and barriers to keep the photographers back. Mechanics jostled to keep lenses from getting a clear view of the car.

The team gave away little on the track. There were no headline-grabbing runs for fastest time. But in trying not to reveal too much about their car, did they create problems for themselves?

Sebastian Vettel admitted the team hadn’t got what it wanted out of last week’s two days of dry running: “I think it’s extremely difficult to pinpoint the exact area [we need to improve] as the tires are not consistent enough.”

But to a man those who watched the RB9s on the track reported they looked stable and swift. It did not look like a slow car, just one that was carrying a lot of fuel. And a full tank at this track carries a lap time penalty of up to five seconds.

So will Red Bull’s 2.4s gap to Nico Rosberg’s 1’20.130 flyer on Sunday be the cause for sleepless nights in Milton Keynes? Don’t count on it. As Vettel made clear: “Where we are now on the time sheet is not that important.”

Keith Collantine is the editor of Formula One blog F1 Fanatic. Follow F1 Fanatic on Twitter.

MRTI: Telitz gets creative to help racing career

Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
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To say that Belardi Auto Racing’s Aaron Telitz has endured a difficult start to the 2018 Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires season would be an understatement. The Wisconsin native only completed four corners through the first three races – Races 1 and 2 at St. Petersburg, and Race 1 at Barber Motorsports Park – with St. Pete being especially problematic.

He took the pole for Race 1, but a crash during qualifying for Race 2 prevented him from actually starting. What’s more, the damage was so severe that the Belardi team needed a brand new chassis, with Telitz’s Dallara IL-15 damaged beyond repair.

They also had to borrow a car from Carlin for Race 2, but Telitz’s race ended after he got tangled up with Victor Franzoni in Turn 2 on Lap 1.

With the damage bill well into the six figures as a result, Telitz has taken to some unique, or rather, creative ways to raise money in the aftermath to help cover the costs. “Creative,” in this case, meaning Telitz is using his art skills.

An artist in his spare time, Telitz has begun selling his own original paintings to help raise money.

 “I’ve been to a lot of art shows and I see stuff and I go, ‘Holy cow, someone’s going to pay a thousand dollars for that thing?’” Telitz quipped in a story posted on the Milwaukee Journal.

In discussing his artistic abilities, Telitz added, “I’m working at getting better. I’d like to be able to paint some animals, those types of things. I got a request from Alexander Rossi to see if I could paint his dog. Unfortunately I can’t do that yet.”

Further, in a partnership with The Styled Garage, Telitz is selling his own merchandise, and accepting donations, to help his cause.

Telitz finished fourth in Race 2 at Barber on Sunday, and sits seventh in the Indy Lights championship, 59 points behind leader Pato O’Ward.

Follow@KyleMLavigne