Top five stats from the Australian Grand Prix

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Last week’s Australian Grand Prix produced some interesting and unusual statistics – here are five of the best:

Youngest field ever

The 22 drivers who qualified for Sunday’s race were, on average, the youngest Formula One has ever seen.

Their average age was 27 years and 61 days, beating the previous record set in the 1997 French Grand Prix.

Esteban Gutierrez is the most junior driver in the field – he was 21 years and 230 days old when he made his F1 debut on Sunday.

Seven race leaders

Seven different drivers took their turn at the head of the field in the opening race. That’s a lot for a 58-lap Grand Prix – in fact there have only been more than that on one other occasion in F1 history. Eight different drivers led the 1971 Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

On Sunday Sebastian Vettel, Felipe Massa, Fernando Alonso, Lewis Hamilton, Nico Rosberg, Adrian Sutil and Kimi Raikkonen all took turns in the lead.

Raikkonen equals Hakkinen

Raikkonen is poised to overtake Mika Hakkinen as the most successful Finnish driver in terms of race wins. Raikkonen’s victory on Sunday tied him with Hakkinen on 20 Grand Prix victories.

However Hakkinen’s two world title wins in 1998 and 1999 give him one more than 2007 champion Raikkonen.

Button hits 1,000

Jenson Button became the third driver in F1 history to reach a career points total in 1,000. Ninth place moved him up to 1,001 points.

However it’s worth keeping in mind that F1’s points system has changed several times. In 2010 the value of a win was increased from 10 to 25 points.

Hulkenberg’s miserable Melbourne luck

Nico Hulkenberg has entered three Australian Grands Prix but is yet to complete a racing lap. In 2010 and 2012 he was involved in crashes at the start.

He didn’t even get that far this year – a fuel system problem put him out before he could make it to the grid.

Read more stats and facts from the Australian Grand Prix

F1 2017 driver review: Kimi Raikkonen

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Kimi Raikkonen

Team: Scuderia Ferrari
Car No.: 7
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 7
Best Finish: P2 (Monaco, Hungary)
Pole Positions: 1
Fastest Laps: 2
Points: 205
Laps Led: 40
Championship Position: 4th

While this may have statistically been Kimi Raikkonen’s best campaign since his first year back in F1 in 2012, there is a good case for it being one of his most disappointing to date.

Raikkonen’s continued role at Ferrari has been questioned on a number of occasions, but the Finn looked capable of answering his critics heading into 2017 after impressing through pre-season testing as he appeared to get to grips well with the new-style cars.

But we soon grew accustomed to the same old story: flashes of potential, but otherwise an underwhelming, unsatisfactory campaign that saw Raikkonen be dwarfed by his teammate, Sebastian Vettel.

Raikkonen’s charge to his first pole position for over eight years in Monaco gave hope of a popular win, only for Ferrari to play its strategy in favor of title contender Vettel – why wouldn’t the team do so? – to leave him a disgruntled second.

While Vettel was able to impress at the majority of circuits, Raikkonen only looked strong at tracks that were unquestionably ‘Ferrari’ tracks, such as Hungary and Brazil. Like Vettel, Raikkonen should have racked up a good haul of points in Singapore, only for the start-line crash to sideline both Ferraris before they even reached Turn 1.

Again there is the question of ‘what could have been?’ in Malaysia had it not been for the spark plug issue on the grid, yet in Japan, Raikkonen was nowhere, finishing behind the Mercedes and Red Bulls.

Finishing just five points clear of Daniel Ricciardo despite having a much faster car for the best part of the season and the Red Bull driver’s own reliability issues sums up the disappointment of Raikkonen’s campaign.

He should have been an ally for Vettel in the title race by nicking points of Lewis Hamilton, much as Valtteri Bottas was doing for his Mercedes teammate. Instead, Raikkonen seemed to be tagging along for the best part of this season.

Season High: Pole in Monaco, his first since the 2008 French Grand Prix.

Season Low: Finishing a distant P4 at Spa – a circuit he made his own in the 2000s.