Top five stats from the Australian Grand Prix

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Last week’s Australian Grand Prix produced some interesting and unusual statistics – here are five of the best:

Youngest field ever

The 22 drivers who qualified for Sunday’s race were, on average, the youngest Formula One has ever seen.

Their average age was 27 years and 61 days, beating the previous record set in the 1997 French Grand Prix.

Esteban Gutierrez is the most junior driver in the field – he was 21 years and 230 days old when he made his F1 debut on Sunday.

Seven race leaders

Seven different drivers took their turn at the head of the field in the opening race. That’s a lot for a 58-lap Grand Prix – in fact there have only been more than that on one other occasion in F1 history. Eight different drivers led the 1971 Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

On Sunday Sebastian Vettel, Felipe Massa, Fernando Alonso, Lewis Hamilton, Nico Rosberg, Adrian Sutil and Kimi Raikkonen all took turns in the lead.

Raikkonen equals Hakkinen

Raikkonen is poised to overtake Mika Hakkinen as the most successful Finnish driver in terms of race wins. Raikkonen’s victory on Sunday tied him with Hakkinen on 20 Grand Prix victories.

However Hakkinen’s two world title wins in 1998 and 1999 give him one more than 2007 champion Raikkonen.

Button hits 1,000

Jenson Button became the third driver in F1 history to reach a career points total in 1,000. Ninth place moved him up to 1,001 points.

However it’s worth keeping in mind that F1’s points system has changed several times. In 2010 the value of a win was increased from 10 to 25 points.

Hulkenberg’s miserable Melbourne luck

Nico Hulkenberg has entered three Australian Grands Prix but is yet to complete a racing lap. In 2010 and 2012 he was involved in crashes at the start.

He didn’t even get that far this year – a fuel system problem put him out before he could make it to the grid.

Read more stats and facts from the Australian Grand Prix

Al Unser Jr. back in IndyCar after a decade away: ‘Life is very good’

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There’s been somewhat of a hole in Al Unser Jr.’s heart ever since he retired from racing in 2007.

It was a void, something was missing.

But now, after a decade away from racing, Unser has found the right medicine to fill that hole in his heart: he’s back in the racing game again.

No, he’s not driving again (although he does participate occasionally in vintage races), but the two-time Indianapolis 500 (1992 and 1994) winner is definitely back in the IndyCar world.

And he couldn’t be happier.

“For me, it’s a dream come true,” Unser told IndyCar.com. “Since I stepped out of the race car and retired from racing, there’s been something missing from my life, and it’s racing.”

Unser has hooked up with Harding Racing. The team competed in three races last season as a ramp-up for a full 17-race effort this season. While Unser’s official title with the team is “consultant,” he’s involved in so much more.

His main role is as a driving coach to 2015 IndyCar Rookie of the Year Gabby Chaves. But he’s also involved in so many other areas, including helping the team obtain sponsorships and much more.

He then added, “I’m involved in every sense of the word except actually driving the car. And I’m happy about that because I’m too old to drive the car.”

Unser, who won CART championships in 1990 and 1994, is now 55. He’s so involved with his new job that he even moved from his native New Mexico and has relocated to suburban Indianapolis.

Not only is it a new start for Unser, it also is for Chaves. After running all 16 races in 2015 for Bryan Herta Autosport with Curb-Agajanian, he competed in just seven races for Dale Coyne Racing in 2016 and only three races for Harding Racing last season.

But he definitely impressed the team, with a fifth- (Texas) and ninth-place (Indianapolis 500) finish in the first two races and 15th (Pocono) in the team’s final run of the season.

That’s why when Harding Racing decided to go fulltime in 2018, Chaves was their pick for behind the wheel. And Unser was their pick to help guide him to potential stardom in the series.

“(Team owner) Mike Harding is definitely a person that when he decides to do something, he does it right,” Unser told IndyCar.com. “The potential for this organization is through the sky. We’re all working really hard here and we see the potential.”

And as for Unser?

“Life is good, life is very good,” he told IndyCar.com. “We’re back full force, eager and better than ever.”

Click here for the full story about Unser from IndyCar.com.