Denny Hamlin on pole for Fontana

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Denny Hamlin will start from the pole position for Sunday’s NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Auto Club Speedway outside Los Angeles after throwing down a lap of 187.451 mph in today’s qualifying session.

Hamlin comes to Southern California after being involved in a post-race feud with former Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Joey Logano one week ago at Bristol Motor Speedway. He’ll share the front row with Greg Biffle on Sunday, but only momentarily — “The Biff,” as well as current championship leader Brad Keselowski (who had the third-fastest lap), will go to the rear of the field due to engine swaps before qualifying.

In addition to Hamlin’s pole run, JGR had a good Friday afternoon overall with Kyle Busch and Matt Kenseth claiming Top 5 starting spots as well. Logano qualified sixth, followed by Martin Truex Jr., defending Auto Club 400 champion Tony Stewart, Mark Martin and Kurt Busch to fill the Top 10 starting positions.

Last week’s winner at Bristol, Kasey Kahne, qualified 16th and is slated to start on the outside of Hendrick Motorsports teammate Dale Earnhardt Jr. in Row 8. As for Danica Patrick, she’ll have to once again attempt to fight her way from the back after posting the 40th-quickest time.

Auto Club 400 at Auto Club Speedway (Fontana, Calif.)
Sunday, 3 pm ET

Track Specs
2-mile oval
Turns: 14 degrees of banking
Frontstretch: 11 degrees
Backstretch: 3 degrees

Race Distance: 200 laps/400 miles

Defending Race Champion: Tony Stewart

Position of F1 start lights altered to compensate for safety halo

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The position of start lights will be altered on Formula One tracks this season, in a bid to ensure the drivers’ line of vision is not impeded by the controversial halo protection device.

The halo is a titanium structure introduced this year in a bid to ramp up driver safety, forming a ring around the cockpit top. It is designed to protect the drivers’ head from loose debris and offer better safety during eventual collisions.

Although drivers largely understand the need for it, very few like it. They are worried it impedes visibility, it looks ugly and also that fans will no longer be able to identify a driver properly from his race helmet. Drivers also take longer to climb in and out of their cars.

Formula One’s governing body has addressed concerns and asked every circuit “to make the lights at a standard height above the track,” FIA race director Charlie Whiting said.

“Pole position seems to be the worst case scenario with the halo,” Whiting added at the season-opening Australian GP. “Maybe the driver can’t quite see the lights, or see only half of them, and he might have to move his head too much.”

The new start lights were positioned lower for Friday’s first two practice sessions at Albert Park. Drivers were also allowed the rare chance to rehearse grid starts at the end of both sessions.

“We haven’t normally allowed practice starts on the grid here because it’s quite a tight timetable,” Whiting said. “What I thought would be a good idea was to give the driver sight of those lights, rather than for the first time on Sunday evening.”

A repeat set of lights has been moved from its usual position halfway up the grid to a more convenient position to the left.

“Those repeat lights were normally halfway up the grid, and they were fitted round about 2009, when the rear wings became higher on the cars,” Whiting said. “But now the wings have been lowered, there’s no need for those halfway up the grid.”