Does IndyCar need a juicy rivalry?

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We all love rivalries — Cowboys vs. Redskins, Celtics vs. Lakers, Yankees vs. Red Sox, etc. — and IZOD IndyCar Series fans would appreciate a legitimate one in their sport as well. But does such a thing exist for them right now?

As NASCAR can tell you, controversy sells. And while IndyCar maintains a loyal following for its action-packed races, it would appear to be lacking in the drama department.

Now, there have been incidents in recent years that have drawn attention. Perhaps the one that comes off the top of most race fans’ heads is Will Power’s double-bird salute to Race Control at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in 2011, a gesture that made sure the series’ one-and-done return to New England would always be remembered.

But those incidents never really evolved into something bigger. They happened, then came the initial attention that eventually died off, and then everyone involved kind of moved on. So does IndyCar need more “black hats” to create feuds that can yield longer-lasting buzz?

Perhaps. But here’s the question: How many in the paddock would relish being the bad guy?

“That’s the thing, it doesn’t sit well on just anybody’s shoulders,” Dario Franchitti told the Associated Press’ Jenna Fryer on Thursday. “[Paul Tracy] loved being the villain. I’ve been portrayed as the villain for some things I’ve done in races, but it’s not something I’m particularly comfortable with. Some guys love it, but it just doesn’t sit well with me.”

Graham Rahal, who got in a short feud with Marco Andretti after the two crashed last year at Long Beach, thinks that the sport’s management has an influence on why rivalries haven’t quite taken root within IndyCar — and that they could do their part to change that.

“Drama is part of it, but our sport in many ways tries to be too clean,” Rahal said to the AP. “Not from the driver side, but from [management and race control], because anytime you did anything, even if it was small, it was a penalty. We need to let some of that go.

“I don’t want it to get dangerous, but if we want to build drama for the sport, then they need to help.”

‘No desire’ for Lewis Hamilton to race in Indianapolis 500

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Lewis Hamilton has ruled out a future appearance in the Indianapolis 500, saying he has “no real plans” to do any serious racing once his time in Formula 1 is over.

Former teammate and current McLaren driver Fernando Alonso took part in the 101st running of the Indy 500 in May, qualifying fifth and running high up the order before retiring late on with an engine issue.

The F1-to-IndyCar crossover proved to be one of the biggest motorsport stories of the year, and has stirred the imagination of other drivers to make a similar step into other events in the future, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans which is known to be on Alonso’s radar as well as that of Haas racer Romain Grosjean.

Three-time F1 world champion Hamilton admired 2017 Indy 500 winner Takuma Sato’s victory ring when on the podium at the Japanese Grand Prix earlier this month, trying it on and joking it may spur him to enter the race to try and win the jewelry.

Speaking ahead of this weekend’s United States Grand Prix in Austin, Texas, Hamilton stressed he made the comment in jest, saying he holds not interest in entering the ‘500.

“Honestly it hasn’t inspired me to do the Indy 500,” Hamilton said.

“I’ve always respected it and appreciated it. I got to watch part of it when Fernando did it which I thought was super exciting. I love the idea of drivers being able to do more than one series.

“Just the other day I got to drive an F1 car on an oval circuit which was interesting. I have a huge amount of respect for those drivers as it is quite scary approaching those banks at the speeds that they do.

“I personally don’t have a desire to drive it. Maybe one day I will go out and have some fun.

“I have a lot of opportunities to do those kinds of things, but no real plans to do anything serious.”

Hamilton has previously said he would like to try a NASCAR race for fun one day, but has made clear his plan after his F1 career is over is to distance himself from racing in order to pursue other interests.