What to watch for: IndyCar at Long Beach

Leave a comment

Can Dario Franchitti turn it around?

The four-time IndyCar champion and three-time Indy 500 winner (pictured) has had a rocky start to his season, but nobody’s going to count him out. He secured a much-needed positive moment yesterday by taking the pole on his final lap of qualifying, but now he has to convert it into a solid result that can start his long climb back up the standings. There’s still time for him to play a role in the championship, but his margin for error is slim at best.

Where’s “Winning Will”?

As competitive as Will Power has remained, it still bears noting that he hasn’t won in the IZOD IndyCar Series since his victory last season in Sao Paulo, Brazil. That’s a stretch of 13 races and considering how tough the overall field is in the series, he’ll have to find a way to get back to Victory Lane soon in order to put himself back into the title hunt (he sits eighth in points). Luckily for Power, he’s the defending champion at the Beach and starts third this afternoon.

Conway rides again

Mike Conway, who stopped his full-time IndyCar career prior to last year’s season finale due to being uncomfortable racing on ovals, has returned to the series this weekend and has been fast in a third Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing car. He was second-quickest in Friday’s combined practice sessions and then cracked the Firestone Fast Six on Saturday, winding up fifth on the grid. The Englishman is a prior winner at Long Beach (2011, Andretti Autosport) and he’ll want to prove that he’s still got what it takes to win in North America’s top open-wheel series.

Turns 1 and 9

These are the two main passing zones on the legendary street circuit. Starts and restarts will be especially exciting as the drivers mimic an Oklahoma land rush down Shoreline Drive before going into the left-hand Turn 1. But T1 is also well-known as a trouble spot — just ask Josef Newgarden, whose attempt to pass Franchitti there on the opening lap of last year’s race ended in the tire barriers. Turn 9 is a righty that emerges after another long straight on the course and begins a tricky sector of corners that culminates with the famous Turn 11 hairpin.

Watch today’s Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach online or on your mobile device.

Have a decent tax refund coming? Buy Ayrton Senna’s 1993 Monaco-winning car

Photos courtesy Bonhams
Leave a comment

Are you expecting a better than normal tax refund? Did you get a very nice bonus from your company due to the new tax cut?

Well, if you have a good chunk of change hanging around and potentially can be in Monaco on May 11, you can have a chance to bid on the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A that the late Ayrton Senna drove in — and won — that year’s Monaco Grand Prix.

We’re not just talking about any race winner. It’s also the same car Senna won his sixth Monaco Grand Prix, and the chassis bears the number six.

It’s also the same car Senna piloted to that season’s F1 championship (his third and final title before sadly being killed the next year) and is the first McLaren driven by Senna that’s ever been sold or put up for auction.

The famed Bonhams auction house is overseeing the sale of the car.

“Any Grand Prix-winning car is important, but to have the golden combination of both Senna and Monaco is a seriously rare privilege indeed,” Bonhams global head of motorsport, Mark Osborne, told The Robb Report.

“Senna and Monaco are historically intertwined, and this car represents the culmination of his achievements at the Monegasque track. This is one of the most significant Grand Prix cars ever to appear at auction, and is certainly the most significant Grand Prix car to be offered since the Fangio Mercedes-Benz W196R, which sold for a world record at auction.”

How much might you need? You might want to get a couple of friends to throw in a few bucks as well.

“We expect the car to achieve a considerable seven-figure sum,” Osborne said.

The London newspaper “The Telegraph” predicts the car will sell in the $6.1 million range.”

“This car will set the world record for a Senna car at auction,” Osborne said. “We are as certain as you can be in the auction world.”

While you won’t be able to take the car for a test drive before the auction, it’ll be ready to roar once you pay the price.

“In theory, the buyer could be racing immediately upon receipt of the cleared funds after the auction,” Osborne said. “All systems are primed and ready.”