Perez: No reason to apologize to Button

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Sergio Perez has spoken out to correct reports about him apologizing to teammate Jenson Button for his actions during the Bahrain Grand Prix.

The two McLaren drivers went head-to-head on track during the race last weekend, with Perez pressurizing Button for the position. When attempting an overtake, Perez made contact with his teammate and lost a front wing endplate, risking Button a puncture. Eventually, Perez forced his way past and went on to finish P6 whilst Button picked up a solitary point for 10th.

After the race, team principal Martin Whitmarsh sat down with both drivers to talk about the incident as it risked the team result. Although Perez admits he apologized to the team, he sees no reason why he should have said sorry to his teammate.

“I didn’t apologize to him because I didn’t think it was necessary,” Perez explained to ESPNF1.

“We owed an apology to the team and that’s what we talked about. It was said in various publications that I apologized to Jenson, but it wasn’t like that.”

Despite this refusal, Perez still believes that his relationship with Button is good.

“We apologized to the team because we risked a lot and we were both very aggressive, but no, at no moment did I apologize and my relationship with Jenson is still okay.”

Morals aside, Perez’s decision to challenge Button paid dividends at the end of the race. He managed to overtake Fernando Alonso and Mark Webber late on to finish P6, and he would probably have failed to challenge them had McLaren ordered him to hold position. These comments prove that Perez is unwilling to play ‘second fiddle’ to Button in the team as the Mexican driver looks to establish himself during his third season.

Red Bull Air Race: Yoshi Muroya joins Sato as Japanese champs at Indy

Photo: Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Content Pool
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Takuma Sato isn’t the only major Japanese athlete to take home top honors at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway this year. Countryman Yoshihide Muroya joined him in that on Sunday after winning Red Bull Air Race at IMS, and the Red Bull Air Race World Championship in the process.

Fittingly, the 101st Indianapolis 500 champion was there on site to join him in the celebration.

Muroya flew with a track-record run in the final and erased the four-point deficit to points leader Martin Sonka. The record run came after a disappointing qualifying effort of 11th in the 14-pilot field in the Master Class.

A day after the win, Muroya joined Sato in heading to Sato’s new Verizon IndyCar Series team, Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing’s, Indianapolis-based shop.

A few social posts from Muroya’s victory and the subsequent celebration are below.

CHECKING OUT EACH OTHER’S RIDES

ASTLES BREAKS THOUGH AS WELL

Muroya wasn’t alone among big winners at the Speedway. In the Challenger Class, Melanie Astles of France became the first woman to win a major race at IMS, and is the first female winner in the Red Bull Air Race World Championship.

Nine women have competed in the Indianapolis 500 (Janet Guthrie, Lyn St. James, Sarah Fisher, Danica Patrick, Milka Duno, Simona de Silvestro, Pippa Mann, Ana Beatriz, Katherine Legge) and Mann is the first woman to have been on the pole position at IMS, having done so for the Freedom 100 in 2010 in Indy Lights.

Photo: Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Content Pool