PWC: Aschenbach’s win validates Blackdog move to GTS

Leave a comment

“This level of car could possibly be the best type of sports car racing in the world.”

It’s a bold statement from Lawson Aschenbach, driver of the No. 10 Blackdog Racing Chevy Camaro in the GTS class of the Pirelli World Challenge. But considering Aschenbach’s resume – driving everything from Porsches, to Civics, to Cadillacs – it carries some weight.

Team and driver switched from the GT class to the GTS class in World Challenge this year; Tony Gaples is a longtime Corvette racer in GT, and Aschenbach drove for the TruSpeed Porsche team in 2012.

Now, they’ve entered a hornet’s nest of competition that includes the RealTime Acuras, GTSport with Goldcrest Porsche Caymans, Best IT Camaros, Kinetic Kia Optimas and other cars such as the Ford Mustang Boss 302Rs, Aston Martin Vantage, Nissan 370Z, Lotus Exige and Scion FR-S. It’s as diverse a class as you’ll see racing in North America today.

“From street car to race car, most are street-related parts,” says Aschenbach. “It’s the best way for a manufacturer to validate their street car. The class showcases that. I don’t see why any manufacturer wouldn’t want to be involved. Top programs like Kinetic, RealTime, Goldcrest/GTSport, etc., probably should be in GT. But this is a great place to prove the team and the car capabilities.”

That makes it all the more impressive that in just their second weekend as a combined unit, Aschenbach took down established class king Peter Cunningham of RealTime at Long Beach to score Blackdog’s first GTS victory (see it Sunday, May 5, 2 p.m. ET, on NBC Sports Network). Aschenbach attests the effort Gaples and chief mechanic Ray Sorenson have put in has made all the difference.

“I’m so pleased with the results so far, but in all honesty, I expected it,” Aschenbach says. “When this program started to come together, and I worked with Ray and Tony a couple years ago in a test day, I realized the professionalism and what they were capable of.”

Aschenbach, who notes the Camaro is a true testament to the effort of GM engineers, handles street courses very well. It has great brakes and takes bumps and corners very well, key elements to success on the concrete canyons that populate the World Challenge schedule.

Knowing where GT cars have their strong suits is also important, as in the GTS class, you always have to be aware of faster GT traffic. Having been in both classes is an asset for both Aschenbach and Gaples.

The drive for another win occurs in a little more than two weeks at Austin’s Circuit of the Americas. GT and GTS will race combined as they have to open the year, with TC and TCB joining for the first time this season.

IndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama final practice report

IndyCar
Leave a comment

Will Power posted the fastest lap in the third practice session for the Grand Prix of Alabama at Barber Motorsports Park in Birmingham, Ala. with a speed of 122.953 mph.

Rookie Robert Wickens (122.552 mph) was second fast, foretelling a continuation of his incredible rookie season.

Scott Dixon (122.237), Ryan Hunter-Reay (122.231) and Alexander Rossi (122.106) rounded out the top five.

The practice was interrupted several times for incidents. 

Ed Jones spun off track in turn five after locking up his brakes with 30 minutes remaining in practice three. He was able to drive back to the pits under his own power.

With 20 minutes still on the clock, Jordan King took a trip into the fence after posting a fastest lap of 121.753 mph. He sustained substantial left side damage to his car and came back to the pits on the hook.

“I’m annoyed really,” King said afterward on the live stream at IndyCar.com. “I slightly locked the inside front, then just stayed off onto the grass and that was it. But I wasn’t really even pushing that hard.”

With two minutes remaining, Charlie Kimball lost power and pulled off the track, bringing an end to the practice session.

Dixon also had an off-road excursion.