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Ten with Townsend: Long Beach and Brazil debrief

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It’s been a busy few weeks for NBC Sports Network IndyCar analyst Townsend Bell. Not only has he called the first four races of the season, but he’s also raced twice in the American Le Mans Series with the West/Alex Job Racing/Boardwalk Ferrari team and done TV work for NBC’s Stadium Super Trucks coverage.

Oh, and he got his Indianapolis 500 deal done too. Bell will race the No. 60 Sunoco and “Turbo” movie entry for Panther Racing.

With all that out of the way, Bell still had time to provide some insights from the last two IndyCar races at Long Beach and Brazil. It’s the latest installment of MotorSportsTalk’s “Ten with Townsend” series (see St. Petersburg and Barber debriefs linked here).

-Before we get to Brazil, how excited are you to have your Panther deal done for the 500, and what will it mean to you to get to work with JR Hildebrand and Oriol Servia?

I’m super pumped. I’m really looking forward to working with both of them. They both get around Indy very well and I expect we’ll have great cars.  It helps having driven for Panther (2004 and 2005) and DRR (2008 and 2011) in the past.

-Brazil: Where does it rank among races you’ve seen? What was it like for you to call those final laps?

It’s the best IndyCar street race I can recall! It was a lot of fun in the booth, and I had a hard time not letting a few holy expletives slip out!

-You said on the broadcast, basically, that now the gloves are off in terms of defending vs. blocking. Do you see that as a positive for the series where officialdom doesn’t interfere?

I expect the drivers will be quite vocal about consistency. How are we supposed to know where the line is if it’s always moving?

-What does it say about Hinch in that he knew how to read Sato’s moves and then be able to pull off a move as he did?

I think it shows his maturity to patiently take care of his tires while the tow in front went at it.  Sato did a great job to try and hang on but he was out of grip by that last lap.

-On Sato (pictured): Regardless of whether he was or wasn’t blocking, with a win and second place, how impressive has he and team been in the last two races?

They have been terrific, but you could see their improvement coming last year.  The fact that they are putting it all together over a race weekend is impressive. The pieces were all there but sometimes they just need to be strung together.  Conor Daly should be excited.

-Through four races, do you feel that the other teams have caught up to Penske and Ganassi, do you think they’ve regressed, or just had poor luck?

It’s a little of both. With a spec car it’s more difficult to find those advantages these days. The benefits of that are debatable.

-Most improved at Brazil? Biggest disappointment?

(Josef) Newgarden was great.  It was nice to see him get a solid top-five and charging for a win.

(Tony) Kanaan.  He worked so hard despite the pain and came up short thru no fault of his own. He is the ultimate warrior, and he’ll be strong at Indy, I’m sure.

-Now as we head into the month of May, do you anticipate the same teams will be strong or does moving to ovals shift it back to the power teams?

Man, it seems like the whole field is strong… seriously.

-At Long Beach, how did you balance the commitments of TV and also racing in ALMS? What did you learn about the track from racing that you could translate to the broadcast?

That plus frantically trying to get my Indy 500 deal lined up?  I’m lucky to have some patient employers who share my passion for racing.

The nuances of the race track help me anticipate what might happen during the race.  My broadcast instincts are sharpened.

-And lastly, how the hell did you survive the GoPro course preview with Wally’s shenanigans?

When he blinded me with silly string during an opposite lock drift…..I was convinced NBC was going to be the proud owner a highly modified Corvette!

Dixon fast once again as times keep falling in Mid-Ohio third practice

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LEXINGTON, Ohio – Scott Dixon being fast at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course is not new.

But Scott Dixon dropping a lap of 1:03.7244 at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course is new.

Dixon, driver of the No. 9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet and leader of first practice, lowered the mark to that aforementioned time in this morning’s 45-minute third practice session for Sunday’s Honda Indy 200.

And mind you, this time is done on Firestone’s primary black sidewall tires on a track that grips up and gets faster as a session goes on.

Dixon’s official track record is 1:04.5814, set last year in qualifying. But if it’s dry (2 p.m. ET on NBCSN), and the Firestone red alternates come out to play, there’s not just a chance that track record will be beat – it could be obliterated.

In the non-Dixon class, Simon Pagenaud, Will Power, Josef Newgarden and Tony Kanaan all also made it into the 1:03 bracket. Max Chilton was an impressive sixth.

Top Honda in this practice was Graham Rahal, as he was on Friday. Except that position is seventh.

The one red flag flew when Spencer Pigot ran in deep at Turn 4 and beached his No. 20 Fuzzy’s Vodka Chevrolet, but the Ed Carpenter Racing driver resumed and returned to the pits with no damage.

Times are below.

MidOFP3

Sainz handed Germany grid drop for blocking Massa

HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY - JULY 30: Carlos Sainz of Spain driving the (55) Scuderia Toro Rosso STR11 Ferrari 060/5 turbo on track  during qualifying for the Formula One Grand Prix of Germany at Hockenheimring on July 30, 2016 in Hockenheim, Germany.  (Photo by Charles Coates/Getty Images)
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Carlos Sainz Jr. has been given a three-place grid penalty for the German Grand Prix after blocking Felipe Massa during Q2 on Saturday at Hockenheim.

Sainz qualified 13th for Toro Rosso, finishing three-tenths of a second off Massa who was the final driver to make it through to Q3 for Williams.

However, Massa was forced to abandon one of his flying laps during Q2 after coming across a slow-moving Sainz at Turn 2.

Sainz tried to get out of the way late on, taking to the grass at the inside of Turn 2, but the damage had been done.

Massa complained to Williams over the radio before race control confirmed it would be investigating the matter after the session.

The FIA stewards in Germany confirmed soon after qualifying that Sainz would drop three places on the grid for Sunday’s race, leaving him 16th for Toro Rosso.

Sainz also received two penalty points on his FIA super licence for the incident, taking him up to four for the 12-month period.

Sainz will still be the highest-starting Toro Rosso in Germany after teammate Daniil Kvyat could only qualify 19th. The Russian will rise to 18th on the grid by virtue of Romain Grosjean’s gearbox penalty.

The German Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and the NBC Sports app from 7am ET on Sunday.

Rosberg: Germany pole satisfying after Q3 setback, heavy fuel run

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Nico Rosberg said that scoring pole position for the German Grand Prix was particularly satisfying given his early setback in Q3 after an electrical issue that forced Mercedes to fuel him heavily for his final run.

Rosberg and Mercedes teammate Lewis Hamilton had exchanged fastest times throughout the week, leading to a showdown for pole in Q3 at Hockenheim.

Rosberg was forced to abandon his first run in Q3 after suffering an electrical issue coming out of Turn 13 that caused his throttle to malfunction.

Mercedes brought Rosberg in and resolved the issue before fuelling him for three laps heading into the final minutes of the session.

Rosberg produced a stunning lap of 1:14.363 to edge out Hamilton, the Briton unable to respond with his final low-fuel qualifying lap.

“It was a great feeling, a great lap,” Rosberg said after qualifying.

“Not only was it just one lap that I had but I also had extra fuel to make sure I had an extra shot if a mistake or something happened, so fuelled for three laps.

“So that’s some more time in the bag there. I was really satisfied with that one, that was cool.”

Rosberg has no concerns about the reliability of his Mercedes W07 Hybrid heading into Sunday’s race despite the electrical issue, and is braced for a close fight with Hamilton and the Red Bull drivers.

“I don’t know what it was. It just suddenly lost the throttle, cut completely the engine,” Rosberg said.

“Just at the end of the lap, so that was disappointing, but I’m sure we’ll fix it for tomorrow.

“It’s never happened before so I’m sure it will be OK.

“Definitely will be an exciting race against Lewis and the Red Bull, and maybe also the Ferraris, but they’re a bit further back it seems.”

The German Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and the NBC Sports app from 7am ET on Sunday.

Nico Rosberg rallies to German GP pole at Hockenheim

HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY - JULY 30: Nico Rosberg of Germany driving the (6) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo on track during qualifying for the Formula One Grand Prix of Germany at Hockenheimring on July 30, 2016 in Hockenheim, Germany.  (Photo by Charles Coates/Getty Images)
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Nico Rosberg bounced back from an electronic issue on his car in qualifying to secure pole position for his home Formula 1 race at Hockenheim in Germany.

Rosberg edged out Mercedes teammate and title rival Lewis Hamilton by one-tenth of a second in Q3 to take pole on home soil for the second time, his first coming two years ago at Hockenheim.

Rosberg and Hamilton were neck-and-neck through their first flying laps in Q3, only for Rosberg to slow in the final sector before pulling into the pits due to an electronic error. Hamilton completed his lap, going six-tenths of a second faster than everyone else to take provisional pole.

With the error resolved, Rosberg emerged from the pits early for his final Q3 run, having the track to himself. The German driver went one-tenth of a second faster than Hamilton to wrestle away provisional pole, piling the pressure on the Briton ahead of his final run.

Hamilton went faster than Rosberg through the first sector, but the rest of the lap fell away from him, meaning he could gain just 0.02 seconds to stay in second place, handing his rival pole.

Daniel Ricciardo qualified third ahead of teammate Max Verstappen, as the two Red Bulls once again defeated Ferrari with relative ease. Kimi Raikkonen finished fifth for the Scuderia, two-tenths clear of Sebastian Vettel in P6.

Nico Hulkenberg led Force India’s charge in P7 ahead of Williams’ Valtteri Bottas, with their respective teammates Sergio Perez and Felipe Massa following in P9 and P10.

Haas came close to picking up its first Q3 appearance in F1 as Esteban Gutierrez qualified 11th, having been pushed out of the top 10 after late improvements from Perez and Massa. Teammate Romain Grosjean failed to match Gutierrez for pace, finishing 15th, but will drop to P20 on the grid due to a gearbox penalty.

McLaren was unable to repeat its double-Q3 run from Hungary as Jenson Button and Fernando Alonso qualified 12th and 14th respectively, split by Carlos Sainz Jr. in the lead Toro Rosso in P13. However, Sainz will have to speak to the stewards after appearing to impede Massa’s hot lap during Q2.

Renault enjoyed mixed fortunes as Jolyon Palmer made his way through to Q2, qualifying 16th, but teammate Kevin Magnussen was narrowly edged out in Q1 after a late improvement from Sainz. The Dane eventually finished the session in 17th.

Pascal Wehrlein finished just one-tenth of a second shy of a Q2 berth in P18, with Manor teammate Rio Haryanto two places further back. Toro Rosso’s Daniil Kvyat split the pair, enduring another tough session by qualifying 19th. Sauber drivers Felipe Nasr and Marcus Ericsson locked out the back row of the grid, half a second adrift from Q2.