Pirelli aims to cut number of pit stops by British GP

1 Comment

In the wake of a Spanish Grand Prix that saw many competitors — including race winner Fernando Alonso — take to a four-stop strategy, Pirelli has indicated that it’s going to make changes to their tires by next month’s British Grand Prix at Silverstone in an attempt to reduce the number of pit stops.

Today’s event at the Circuit de Catalunya featured a whopping 79 stops, with 12 of the drivers doing a four-stop race.

“Our aim is to have [each car make] between two and three stops at every race, so it’s clear that four is too many,” Pirelli motorsport director Paul Hembery told Formula One’s official website. “In fact, it’s only happened once before, in Turkey during our first year in the sport. We’ll be looking to make some changes, in time for Silverstone, to make sure that we maintain our target and solve any issues rapidly.”

Pirelli made tweaks to its hard compound tire for this weekend’s event, but the Italian manufacturer was once again criticized for their tires’ degradation over the course of the afternoon. Especially vocal about it was former World Champion and eighth-place finisher Jenson Button from McLaren, who called the situation “a right mess” according to Paul Weaver of Britain’s The Guardian.

“When I see a car behind [me], I let it past because I’m doing a different strategy and I don’t want to damage my tires,” Button continued. “If I block, I might destroy my tires. It’s the same thing we had in China — waving each other past so we don’t destroy our rubber while hoping that the guy who’s overtaking will.”

Hembery had hinted at an overhaul earlier in the weekend following a high-speed medium tire failure involving Force India’s Paul di Resta during FP2. Pirelli later said that it believed debris caused a small cut in the tread, which then overheated and caused the failure.

Hamilton: Abu Dhabi ‘the last race with good-looking cars’ in F1

Getty Images
1 Comment

Lewis Hamilton believes that this weekend’s Abu Dhabi Grand Prix will be remembered as the last race with good-looking Formula 1 cars ahead of the introduction of the ‘Halo’ cockpit protection for next year.

Officials from the FIA and F1 Strategy Group confirmed earlier this year that the Halo would be fitted to all cars from the 2018 season in a bid to improve safety standards, with the deaths of Justin Wilson and Jules Bianchi putting head protection high on the agenda for the series’ chiefs.

Hamilton has long made his opposition to the Halo clear, believing it will ruin the look of F1 cars, and echoed his thoughts ahead of the final Halo-less race in Abu Dhabi this weekend.

“It’s the last year of looking good I think in the cars. It’s the last race where the cars will look good,” Hamilton said.

“I think next year, it’s all downhill from there in terms of how they look.

“But safety will go up at least, and maybe it could be successful in some way.”

Hamilton’s F1 title rival Sebastian Vettel was less bothered about the change, believing the field will adjust and move on.

“The cars will look different next year. Everything I’ve seen so far looks different, but on the other hand it is something we all get used to,” Vettel said.

“But no doubt the cars look better now, but we’ll get used to it, and we’ll work on the aesthetics so it can be better. It is less of a big deal.”

Red Bull’s Daniel Ricciardo shared Vettel’s view, saying: “I don’t think it’s gonna be as dramatic as most people make it out to be.”