F1 Flashback: Rosberg’s stunning Monaco GP win (VIDEO)

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Keke Rosberg’s Monaco Grand Prix victory on this day 30 years ago was a classic example of a world champion seizing an opportunity to win in an unfancied car.

Rosberg had lifted the title for Williams in 1982 but the following year a turbo-powered car was the thing to have. Rosberg’s Cosworth-engined Williams was hopelessly out-gunned at most tracks. At Silverstone that year he led the non-turbo qualifiers but was a depressing 4.2 seconds off the pace.

But the tight, twisty confines of Monaco offered Williams a glimmer of hope. Rosberg wrung the neck of his FW08C in qualifying and planted it fifth on the grid behind the turbo Renaults and Ferraris.

On race day the weather tipped matters a little further in his favor: it rained, and the track was still damp and slippery as the start time approached.

While most drivers elected to start the race on wet-weather tires, Rosberg and Williams team mate Jacques Laffite opted for slicks. The call was spot-on: by the first corner Rosberg was already up to second, and as they began the second lap he pulled out from behind Alain Prost and crossed the line two-tenths of a second before the Renault.

The next time they came by Rosberg was a further second and a half up the road. By the fifth tour his lead was over 11 seconds and with the track drying out his rivals needed to pit for slicks.

Two laps later that had been done, leaving Rosberg with a 28 second margin over his team mate and the rest a further 20 seconds in a arrears. And still he continued to pull ahead, drifting the Williams between the barriers on the treacherous surface.

After 76 laps of racing Rosberg’s virtuoso performance was rewarded with his second career win. And anyone who doubted the credentials of a driver who’d won just once on his way to the 1982 championship had been given cause to think again.

Simon Pagenaud has words with Gabby Chaves after Honda Indy GP of Alabama

Photos: IndyCar
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The rain didn’t stop following the conclusion of the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama, and neither did the jousting between drivers.

An angry Team Penske’s Simon Pagenaud confronted Harding Racing’s Gabby Chaves after the race, complaining that Chaves would not let Pagenaud get past him in the closing laps.

Instead of ending up with a hoped-for Top 5, Pagenaud wound up with a ninth-place finish. Chaves, meanwhile, finished 17th, two laps down.

The confrontation turned into a battle of words and profanity between the two drivers, as captured on Twitter by AutoWeek’s Matt Weaver.

Afterward – and after their tempers cooled down somewhat – both Pagenaud and Chaves gave their sides of the confrontation to NBCSN.

Gabby Chaves

First, here’s Pagenaud’s take on things:

“We had a really good race going,” Pagenaud said. “I think we potentially could have been top 5. I was really frustrated with Gabby. He was two laps down and I was stuck behind him, which gave an opportunity to (Scott) Dixon as I was trying to do everything I could to make it happen.

“It’s a real shame because when it’s not your day, it’s not your day. You’ll have better days later, but you want to have everybody on your side when you have a good day. At the moment, he doesn’t have me on his side, let me tell you. It’s a real shame.”

When asked what exactly he said to Chaves, Pagenaud demurred.

“Driver’s stuff,” he said with a slight smile. “We’ve all been there. I’ve been in his position. My side, I played it smart. It is what it is.

“I can’t comment for him. You can ask him the question. I’m not going to make a deal about it, it’s just a shame it ruined my race. We’ll come back stronger. It’s Indy soon, so that’ll put a smile on my face.”

NBCSN then caught up with Chaves for his side of the story.

 

“It’s a tough situation, we had to restart (the rain-delayed race) a lap down,” Chaves said. “Our whole strategy depends on trying to get a yellow and holding our position. Some guys think that the track belongs only to them, they’re the only guys on-track.

“Everyone else who was faster at that point – we were only one lap down to the leader, so we’re still on our strategy and don’t know what’s going to happen – as soon as they got right up next to me on the lead lap, I let them go.

“Simon was the only one who couldn’t drive up to me. I understand his frustration, but he’s the one who has to save fuel to make his strategy work, that’s not our fault, right?”

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