With Indy pole captured, Carpenter sets sights on bigger prize

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Since he was a little boy, Ed Carpenter — Indianapolis native, Butler University graduate, and stepson of IZOD IndyCar Series founder Tony George — has known how important the Indianapolis 500 is. Perhaps that is why he’s taking his pole position for the 97th running in stride, instead focusing on what lies ahead next weekend.

“This is a good start,” said Carpenter, who shocked the high-powered Team Penske and Andretti Autosport teams to win the pole with a four-lap average of 228.762 miles per hour. “I want to make sure to keep the team focused because I hope this is Part One of a really magical month. We’re here for Race Day.

“This is awesome and it’s bigger than our [race] wins, and it’s huge for the team…It’s definitely a landmark day. But I don’t want to get overly focused on this, because we have a lot of work to do yet.”

Carpenter, the owner of his own single-car squad, delivered a victory for the little guys this afternoon and will get to enjoy a week’s worth of bragging rights, 15 championship points, and an extra $100,000 — which is always nice to come across when you’re in his position. But while he considers it, in his words, “an honor” to win a pole at Indianapolis, he knows very well that people only remember who wins the race at the Brickyard.

He’ll think about today’s accomplishment, but just a little. Then he’ll think about how to get an even bigger accomplishment next Sunday.

“I love the race a whole lot more than qualifying, and I really want to send a message and make sure I lead by example for the team and make sure we don’t forget why we’re really here,” he said. “This is fun and huge for our team — I don’t want to think that it’s not — but the pole won’t mean much if we don’t go out and perform on Race Day.”

A race victory would be a culmination of sorts for Carpenter, who grew up racing midget cars before migrating over to open-wheel formula racing. In his early years in IndyCar, he was sometimes mocked as a driver that was only in the sport because of his family connections. But as time went by, he began to earn a solid level of respect and wins at Kentucky in 2011 and Fontana in 2012 cemented him as one of the best oval racers in the paddock.

Now, Carpenter has the opportunity to make his biggest dream come true in front of his hometown fans, who let him know just how much they appreciated his efforts by loudly cheering him on in the Fast Nine and at the end when he had the pole sewn up.

“It gives you confidence knowing that people are behind you,” he said.

FIA returns Manor’s F1 entry fee for 2017

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Good news: Manor Grand Prix Racing Limited got a refund of an entry fee it paid to the FIA to run in this year’s F1 season.

Bad news: Manor still hasn’t run this year, and won’t be for the foreseeable future (especially as Manor’s former leadership staff is moving that team into FIA WEC’s new-look LMP1 class in addition to its LMP2 program).

Manor Group’s receivership outfit, Just Racing Services Limited, went into administration earlier this year. As there was no new buyer for the F1 team, Manor dropped from the 2017 grid before the season.

The FIA said it would return its entry fee to help Manor Group pay off outstanding debts.

It basically means nothing in the grand scheme of things since Manor missed out on 10th place in the constructor’s standings in 2016 and fell from the F1 grid as a result, but hey, it’s a goodwill gesture going into Thanksgiving this week.