Alonso on a quest for history in Monte Carlo (VIDEO)

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Ever since its creation in 1929 on the streets of Monte Carlo, the Monaco Grand Prix has rewarded the best of the best.

The list of people that have won it multiple times is a veritable galaxy of Formula One stars, past and present: Ayrton Senna, six wins; Graham Hill and Michael Schumacher, five each; Alain Prost, four; Stirling Moss and Jackie Stewart, three; and seven more with two wins apiece.

The fact that all of these drivers were able to handle a course as difficult as Monaco multiple times over speaks to how great they were and still are.

Five of Senna’s six victories in Monte Carlo were consecutive from 1989 to 1993, and he had eight podiums in 10 overall starts there. From 1984 to 1983, he and Prost were the only drivers to win the race. Then there’s Hill, whose five wins in the Principality nearly made up half of the total win count over his career (there’s a reason why he was dubbed “Mr. Monaco” in his heyday). Schumacher took up the baton in the mid-1990s and kept making his mark on the circuit into the new millennium, while Moss and Stewart dominated primarily in the ’60s and ’70s.

Amongst the group of two-time victors (a group that also features immortals like Juan Manuel Fangio and Niki Lauda) is Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso, who roars into the Principality on the strength of a clutch victory at Barcelona that bolstered his championship hopes. He still has a long way to go to catch the great Senna as the ultimate king of Monaco, but this weekend, he has the chance to do something neither Senna or anyone else has done: Win the Monaco GP three times with three different squads.

In 2006, Alonso took advantage of pole position (which he achieved after Schumacher was penalized for impeding the Spaniard’s progress during the last moments of qualifying) and won for Renault. Then in 2007, Alonso, who had moved over to McLaren that season, again converted pole into victory ahead of then-teammate Lewis Hamilton in a 1-2 finish for the team.

Monaco has been good to Alonso lately, with back-to-back podiums achieved in his last two runs in Formula One’s most famous race. But can he go one step further and put himself into the record books again this weekend?

Altogether, the Prancing Horse has been thirsty in the Principality for quite some time; Ferrari has not won the Monaco GP since Schumacher’s win in 2001.

‘No desire’ for Lewis Hamilton to race in Indianapolis 500

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Lewis Hamilton has ruled out a future appearance in the Indianapolis 500, saying he has “no real plans” to do any serious racing once his time in Formula 1 is over.

Former teammate and current McLaren driver Fernando Alonso took part in the 101st running of the Indy 500 in May, qualifying fifth and running high up the order before retiring late on with an engine issue.

The F1-to-IndyCar crossover proved to be one of the biggest motorsport stories of the year, and has stirred the imagination of other drivers to make a similar step into other events in the future, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans which is known to be on Alonso’s radar as well as that of Haas racer Romain Grosjean.

Three-time F1 world champion Hamilton admired 2017 Indy 500 winner Takuma Sato’s victory ring when on the podium at the Japanese Grand Prix earlier this month, trying it on and joking it may spur him to enter the race to try and win the jewelry.

Speaking ahead of this weekend’s United States Grand Prix in Austin, Texas, Hamilton stressed he made the comment in jest, saying he holds not interest in entering the ‘500.

“Honestly it hasn’t inspired me to do the Indy 500,” Hamilton said.

“I’ve always respected it and appreciated it. I got to watch part of it when Fernando did it which I thought was super exciting. I love the idea of drivers being able to do more than one series.

“Just the other day I got to drive an F1 car on an oval circuit which was interesting. I have a huge amount of respect for those drivers as it is quite scary approaching those banks at the speeds that they do.

“I personally don’t have a desire to drive it. Maybe one day I will go out and have some fun.

“I have a lot of opportunities to do those kinds of things, but no real plans to do anything serious.”

Hamilton has previously said he would like to try a NASCAR race for fun one day, but has made clear his plan after his F1 career is over is to distance himself from racing in order to pursue other interests.