Trevor Bayne gets married, then wins Nationwide race in Iowa

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Step one, get married. Step two, deliver on track.

Maybe that wasn’t originally how 2011 Daytona 500 champion Trevor Bayne drew things up of late, but that’s how they have transpired.

Bayne’s been mired in a bit of a career slump since that shock win in only his second ever NASCAR Sprint Cup Series start. This year, back in a full-time Nationwide Series ride, Bayne took over the No. 6 Ford that Ricky Stenhouse Jr. has driven to back-to-back series championships.

Last Tuesday, he tied the knot with longtime girlfriend Ashton, ahead of the Nationwide race at Iowa Speedway. That was a good thing for the 22-year-old on the personal front.

But it had been a tough slog racing-wise until Sunday in Iowa, which had been rain-delayed by a day. Bayne’s car was set up for long runs and in the final stretch of the race, it absolutely came alive.

Bayne caught in erstwhile dominant race leader Austin Dillon despite being more than two seconds behind him. After a side-by-side battle for a couple laps, Bayne emerged ahead on lap 239 in the 250-lap DuPont Pioneer 250.

“I knew we’d catch (Austin), but once I got to him, you could really see that he was frustrated,” Bayne told NASCAR.com after his first win of the season, and second in his Nationwide career.

“I just stayed behind him for a couple of laps to let him cool off. If he was frustrated, I didn’t want to take a chance on anything. There was a time where I cleared him and I was able to drive away enough to where he couldn’t get back to my bumper and try to cross us over, so that’s where I made the pass.”

Bayne’s win is only the third in 12 starts by a NASCAR Nationwide Series regular this year, with Regan Smith and Sam Hornish Jr., 1-2 in the points standings, scoring the other two. The Nationwide race at Iowa was also the first standalone event of the year for the second-tier series, which often shares Sprint Cup weekends.

F1 2017 driver review: Lewis Hamilton

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Following on from the driver reviews from the Verizon IndyCar Series, MotorSportsTalk kicks off its Formula 1 recaps by looking back on Lewis Hamilton’s championship year.

Lewis Hamilton

Team: Mercedes AMG Petronas
Car No.: 44
Races: 20
Wins: 9
Podiums (excluding wins): 4
Pole Positions: 11
Fastest Laps: 7
Points: 363
Laps Led: 527
Championship Position: 1st

Lewis Hamilton may have wrapped up his fourth Formula 1 world title with two races to spare, but his margin of victory was far from representative of what was arguably his greatest championship victory yet.

Mercedes entered 2017 bidding to become the first team to defend its titles across a seismic regulation change, and appeared to be on the back foot early on after Ferrari impressed in pre-season testing and won the opening race through Sebastian Vettel.

Hamilton was left wrestling with a “diva” of a car, as coined by Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff, but was able to get on top of it by the second race of the year in China, taking a dominant win in wet-dry conditions.

The win was representative of Hamilton’s form through the first portion of the season. When he won, he won in style – as in Spain, Canada and on home soil in Great Britain – but the off weekends saw him struggle.

Heading into the summer break, Vettel’s championship lead stood at 14 points, with the pair’s on-track rivalry having already spilled over in Baku when they made contact behind the safety car.

But Hamilton then produced the form that propelled him to titles in 2014 and 2015, breaking the back of the season through the final flyaways. As Vettel and Ferrari capitulated over the Asian rounds, picking up just 12 points when a full score of 75 for three wins was certainly in reach, Hamilton capitalised and put himself on the brink of the title.

While Hamilton’s run to P9 in Mexico was a messy way to wrap up his hardest-fought title to date, getting across the line and the job done was a significant result.

Unlike his last two titles, Hamilton was tasked with an enemy outside of the team in this title race and a car that arguably wasn’t the fastest on the grid.

But his unquestionable talent and ability to dig deep to get himself out of tough situations – Singapore and Brazil being two key examples where the result was far from expected – proved crucial once again.

Hamilton is now in the annals of F1 history as one of its all-time greats. The pole record is his, and only two drivers can boast more world titles than him (Michael Schumacher and Juan Manuel Fangio).

Depending on how long he wants to continue racing, going down as F1’s statistical all-time great is certainly not out of the realm of possibility.

Season High: Charging from the pit lane to P4 in Brazil, a race he could have even won.

Season Low: Dropping out in Q2 in Monaco, only recovering to P7 in the race.