Mercedes and FIA have history, when Mercedes was BAR

Leave a comment

The team now known as Mercedes heads to this week’s FIA Tribunal having been in hot water with the FIA before, but not as Mercedes.

They’ve had to accept rulings from the FIA under an earlier guise of British American Racing, in that team’s first (1999) and last (2005) year on the Formula One grid.

Six degrees of Kevin Bacon separates Mercedes from BAR. Here’s the backstory: Mercedes bought out Ross Brawn’s majority stakeholder role in what was Brawn GP, the Cinderella 2009 Formula One World Champions. Brawn saved Honda’s team from the scrap heap after 2008, when Honda pulled out as a manufacturer.

Honda, of course, had bought out the former British American Racing team, and that’s where the most recent issue with the FIA occurred at the 2005 San Marino Grand Prix.

Jenson Button had finished third in the race, but was summoned to the race stewards and found to be under the 600 kg minimum weight once the car was drained of fuel. BAR provided the stewards with data to clear its name, but the FIA appealed to send them to court.

There, despite the FIA’s wishes to have the team banned from the rest of the season, only a two-race ban was imposed for Button and teammate Takuma Sato. Both drivers were disqualified from the San Marino Grand Prix from third and fifth place.

The earlier issue with BAR occurred before its first ever race in 1999. Craig Pollock’s dream was to have a team with separate liveries, Lucky Strike for Jacques Villeneuve and 555 for Ricardo Zonta, two give British American Tobacco’s two brands equal play. The idea was shot down by the FIA and what resulted afterwards was a “split livery” with the two brands opposite each other on the chassis.

Toyota victorious in Bahrain on Porsche’s LMP1 swansong

Toyota Motorsport GmbH
Leave a comment

SAKHIR, Bahrain – Toyota denied Porsche a swansong victory in its final LMP1 appearance in the FIA World Endurance Championship by taking a commanding win in the 6 Hours of Bahrain on Saturday.

Porsche started from pole in the last competitive outing for the three-time Le Mans-winning 919 Hybrid car, only to lose out to Toyota’s Sebastien Buemi within the first half an hour of the race.

Porsche lost one of its cars from contention for victory after an errant bollard got stuck underneath Timo Bernhard’s No. 2 entry, leaving Nick Tandy to lead its charge in the No. 1 car.

Tandy moved into the lead just past half distance after a bold strategy call from Porsche to triple-stint the Briton after a fuel-only stop, vaulting him ahead of Anthony Davidson in the No. 8 Toyota.

Tandy’s win hopes were soon dashed when he tangled with a GTE-Am backmarker at Turn 1, sustaining damage that forced Porsche into an unplanned pit stop that put the car a lap down.

With the No. 7 Toyota losing two laps following a clash with a GTE-Pro car earlier on, Davidson, Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima went unchallenged en route to the car’s fifth victory of the season.

Porsche rounded out the podium with its cars, with the No. 2 leading home the No. 1, leaving Toyota’s No. 7 car to settle for P4 at the checkered flag.

Vaillante Rebellion clinched the title in LMP2 after a stunning fightback led by Bruno Senna, with the Brazilian securing his maiden motorsport championship win in the process.

GTE-Pro saw AF Corse complete a hat-trick of titles in 2017, with James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi wining the class’ first world championship recognized by the FIA, while Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Mathias Lauda sewed up the GTE-Am title.