Social media a boon to F1, NASCAR — but IndyCar lags


NASCAR and Formula One have embraced social media. But IndyCar is struggling to keep up with its motorsports counterparts.

In a Wednesday story on, Indianapolis Business Journal sports reporter Anthony Schoettle gives a social media breakdown that shows IndyCar is trailing in the Twitter world.

“In terms of Twitter followers, NASCAR is king, with more than 1.1 million as of Tuesday morning. Formula One’s official Twitter account has a tick under 538,000. The IndyCar Series has just short of 92,000. Formula One has built its large following with just over 5,000 tweets, compared with the IndyCar Series’ 21,700. NASCAR has more than 37,000.”

That lack of social media prowess may also play a role in IndyCar being somewhat stagnant when it comes to attracting new fans — and more importantly, new sponsors and their fat wallets, Schoettle writes.

“IndyCar Series executives have their hands full trying to bolster the all-important live attendance and television viewership numbers that drive sponsors to be a part of their series.

“But there’s another set of numbers to be concerned about, and it clearly has the attention of sponsors.

“Twice in the last month, I’ve gotten newsletters from prominent firms representing sports sponsors listing the social media following of the major auto racing series. The numbers don’t lie. And for IndyCar, the numbers aren’t particularly good.”

Indianapolis 500 winner Tony Kanaan has 606,000 Twitter followers, according to IBJ, many of them new followers after Kanaan won the world’s most famous race last month. But the numbers drop off dramatically afterward: Part-time IndyCar (and NASCAR part-timer) A.J. Allmendinger has over 109,000 followers (most likely from his full-time NASCAR days). Dario Franchitti is close to 100,000 followers and Helio Castroneves is just under 87,500.

As Schoettle noted, “The other top full-time IndyCar drivers have well below 75,000, and most are under 50,000.”

By comparison, two former IndyCar drivers lead the way: Danica Patrick (nearly 919,000 followers) and even Juan Pablo Montoya, who has struggled since transitioning from Formula One to NASCAR in 2007, has 745,000 followers.

And there lies an interesting irony. Even though both Patrick and Montoya have done little in their NASCAR careers to date, they still far outrank fellow series racers like five-time champion Jimmie Johnson (436,000 followers), four-time champ Jeff Gordon (nearly 419,000) and defending Sprint Cup champ Brad Keselowski (417,000).

Keselowski picked up more than 100,000 new followers in the span of just over one hour when the 2012 Daytona 500 was red-flagged after Montoya ran into the back of a track jet dryer, igniting a monstrous plume of flame that damaged the racing surface at Daytona International Speedway, requiring emergency repairs before the race could restart. During the down time, Keselowski tweeted away behind the wheel of his parked race car, and with some well-placed prodding by Fox Sports TV, fans signed up to follow Keselowski in record numbers.

But while Formula One the sanctioning body trails NASCAR in Twitter followers, that can’t be said about F1’s drivers. They blow the roof off: Fernando Alonso (1.7 million), Lewis Hamilton (1.6 millon) and Jenson Button (1.5 million).

Marcos Ambrose will retire from racing full time

Marcos Ambrose
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Former NASCAR winner Marcos Ambrose’s full-time racing career appears to have reached the finish line.

DJR Team Penske announced Monday an expansion to two cars in the V8 Supercars Championship next season with Fabian Coulthard and Scott Pye running Ford Falcons on the Australian-based circuit, leaving Ambrose on the sidelines.

Ambrose, a two-time V8 Supercars champion, left NASCAR to return to his home country this season and help lead Team Penske’s international foray. But the Tasmanian stepped out of the car after the season opener and said he would focus solely on endurance racing the rest of the year.

“I fully support the team with the exciting announcements here today,” Ambrose said in a team release announcing Coulthard and Pye. “My number one priority since stepping out of the car full time was helping the team with that transition and in Fabian and Scotty, the team has a great future ahead for 2016 and beyond.”

In an interview with the Melbourne Herald Sun, Ambrose said he was mulling co-driving in endurance races next year.

“I do not intend to drive full time anymore,” Ambrose, 39, said. “I elected not to be a part of it. It’s absolutely my choice. There is no sadness. I’ve had a great run, a great career. I have my own personal reasons. I’ve got other priorities now.”

After 28 wins in V8 Supercars from 2002-05 and consecutive titles in 2003-04, Ambrose moved to the United States in 2006 and began a nine-season run in NASCAR. He started in the Camping World Truck and Xfinity series before moving full time into Sprint Cup in 2009.

All seven of his wins (five in Xfinity, two in Cup) were on road or street  courses – six at Watkins Glen International, one at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal).

In an interview earlier this season, Ambrose said he struggled to re-acclimate to the cars while dealing with the news media scrutiny of his comeback.

“I want to enjoy my racing and I certainly don’t want to be in the tabloids week in and week out,” he told “That’s not what I come back for. “It’s just a very difficult thing to come back to because just the opportunity to learn without being on the front page of every national newspaper is just impossible. So I didn’t want to be that guy everyone is looking at because he is running 25th and they don’t understand that you have no practice time in the car, you don’t have any tires to practice on even when you get there.

“I didn’t want to let the team down that way. So when I came down and saw the landscape and what I was facing, for me it became untenable to keep going the way I was.”


IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Sage Karam

Sage Karam
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MotorSportsTalk continues its run through the 2015 Verizon IndyCar Series field, driver-by-driver. Ending in 20th was Sage Karam, who generated a lot of headlines despite missing a handful of races in his first full season in the big leagues.

Sage Karam, No. 8 Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet

  • 2014: 9th place at Indianapolis 500; several starts in the TUDOR United SportsCar Championship
  • 2015: 20th place (12 starts), Best Finish 3rd, Best Start 3rd, 1 Podium, 2 Top-5, 2 Top-10, 12 Laps Led, 14.5 Avg. Start, 15.8 Avg. Finish

Few drivers generated as much ink as Karam did during what as an ultimately race-by-race rookie season that saw him active in 12 of 16 races. It was an overall rocky campaign that featured any combination of brilliance, controversy and heartache depending on the weekend.

Karam was on the back foot to begin with anyway with limited preseason testing, following a wrist injury sustained in a crash at Barber Motorsports Park. The fact he was out of a car for Long Beach and the Grand Prix of Indianapolis owed to financial reasons but also served as a wakeup call that he needed to improve off the back of several ragged races to open the season. The speed was there for the Indianapolis 500 but the result wasn’t, with a first-lap crash and the following debacle of a doubleheader weekend at Detroit a week later ultimately Karam’s nadir.

Luckily for the 20-year-old, he had Dario Franchitti as a tutor, mentor and coach, and a post-Detroit “come to Jesus” meeting might have been the biggest impetus for change. Karam then surged in the second half of the year – primarily on ovals – and worked his way into the headlines courtesy of his driving and take-no-prisoners aggressive approach, particularly with Ed Carpenter at Iowa. In a single sentence, he was worth the price of admission almost on his own while also putting himself in contention for series “black hat” status.

Karam was on track for what would have been a dream weekend at home in Pocono, leading with 20 laps to go, when he lost control and crashed out – the debris from the car ultimately striking Justin Wilson’s helmet. It was a tragic end to the race but it was no fault of Karam’s that what happened, happened.

For as much as the community is rallying around Wilson’s family, it needs to do the same for Karam. At 20, he’s a talented driver with a bright future ahead of him, who continued to mature over the course of the season. You just don’t want Pocono to be the race that affects him psychologically, and prevents him from fully realizing his undoubted potential.