FIA tribunal arguments focusing on ‘the code’

Leave a comment

As the FIA tribunal surrounding tiregate continues to unfold, the arguments are becoming increasingly heated and passionate, with both Pirelli and Mercedes claiming that they are innocent over the matter. However, just as MotorSportsTalk analyzed the details determining the verdict for the case, such fine points could once again come into play in Paris.

For Mercedes, their argument surrounded the FIA’s sporting regulations which they unquestionably come under. Interestingly, they appeared to pick up on the syntax used; the FIA claim that Mercedes ‘undertook’ the test, whilst Mercedes claim that it was in fact Pirelli who ‘undertook’ the test by asking the team to run at the Circuit de Catalunya. Despite both being in the dock, there appears to be little cohesion or collusion between the two parties – perhaps it is a case of damage limitation? Furthermore, Mercedes argued that Ferrari should be brought back into the investigation, despite the Italian team being acquitted after testing with their 2011 car after the Bahrain Grand Prix.

Pirelli’s argument is also finely poised, with their lawyer claiming: “Pirelli cannot understand the disciplinary action. Pirelli is only acting with the rights it was given by the FIA.

“The claims are unfounded because it has been recognized that Pirelli has not violated the code.”

This ‘code’ that the tire supplier is referring to is the set of FIA Sporting Regulations which all teams must adhere too, but Pirelli’s argument is based on the fact that they do not come under the FIA’s jurisdiction as per the regulations.

A closer look at the regulations suggests a very different story though:

“All drivers, competitors and officials participating in the Championship undertake, on behalf of themselves, their employees, agents and suppliers, to observe all the provisions as supplemented or amended of the International Sporting Code (the Code), the Formula One Technical Regulations (the Technical Regulations) and the present Sporting Regulations together referred to as “the Regulations”.

Pirelli, as a supplier, is therefore required to abide by this code, yet their argument is that they are not under this umbrella.

Interestingly, the example which the Italian tire supplier has chosen to use involves Flavio Briatore’s ban from the sport in the wake of Crashgate in 2009. Briatore was banned from all F1 activities, yet he managed to have this ruling overturned in a Paris court as he was not under the FIA’s jurisdiction, and the Italian supremo now attends many grands prix. The FIA reacted by introducing personnel licenses to the sport, covering this loophole. In this case though, the regulations do seem to be more water-tight.

Similarly, Pirelli and Mercedes are trying to expose flaws in the FIA regulations, and it could well come down to the use of English in making a decision, which is due on Friday after all of the evidence was heard today in Paris.

Position of F1 start lights altered to compensate for safety halo

Getty Images
Leave a comment

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The position of start lights will be altered on Formula One tracks this season, in a bid to ensure the drivers’ line of vision is not impeded by the controversial halo protection device.

The halo is a titanium structure introduced this year in a bid to ramp up driver safety, forming a ring around the cockpit top. It is designed to protect the drivers’ head from loose debris and offer better safety during eventual collisions.

Although drivers largely understand the need for it, very few like it. They are worried it impedes visibility, it looks ugly and also that fans will no longer be able to identify a driver properly from his race helmet. Drivers also take longer to climb in and out of their cars.

Formula One’s governing body has addressed concerns and asked every circuit “to make the lights at a standard height above the track,” FIA race director Charlie Whiting said.

“Pole position seems to be the worst case scenario with the halo,” Whiting added at the season-opening Australian GP. “Maybe the driver can’t quite see the lights, or see only half of them, and he might have to move his head too much.”

The new start lights were positioned lower for Friday’s first two practice sessions at Albert Park. Drivers were also allowed the rare chance to rehearse grid starts at the end of both sessions.

“We haven’t normally allowed practice starts on the grid here because it’s quite a tight timetable,” Whiting said. “What I thought would be a good idea was to give the driver sight of those lights, rather than for the first time on Sunday evening.”

A repeat set of lights has been moved from its usual position halfway up the grid to a more convenient position to the left.

“Those repeat lights were normally halfway up the grid, and they were fitted round about 2009, when the rear wings became higher on the cars,” Whiting said. “But now the wings have been lowered, there’s no need for those halfway up the grid.”