FIA tribunal arguments focusing on ‘the code’

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As the FIA tribunal surrounding tiregate continues to unfold, the arguments are becoming increasingly heated and passionate, with both Pirelli and Mercedes claiming that they are innocent over the matter. However, just as MotorSportsTalk analyzed the details determining the verdict for the case, such fine points could once again come into play in Paris.

For Mercedes, their argument surrounded the FIA’s sporting regulations which they unquestionably come under. Interestingly, they appeared to pick up on the syntax used; the FIA claim that Mercedes ‘undertook’ the test, whilst Mercedes claim that it was in fact Pirelli who ‘undertook’ the test by asking the team to run at the Circuit de Catalunya. Despite both being in the dock, there appears to be little cohesion or collusion between the two parties – perhaps it is a case of damage limitation? Furthermore, Mercedes argued that Ferrari should be brought back into the investigation, despite the Italian team being acquitted after testing with their 2011 car after the Bahrain Grand Prix.

Pirelli’s argument is also finely poised, with their lawyer claiming: “Pirelli cannot understand the disciplinary action. Pirelli is only acting with the rights it was given by the FIA.

“The claims are unfounded because it has been recognized that Pirelli has not violated the code.”

This ‘code’ that the tire supplier is referring to is the set of FIA Sporting Regulations which all teams must adhere too, but Pirelli’s argument is based on the fact that they do not come under the FIA’s jurisdiction as per the regulations.

A closer look at the regulations suggests a very different story though:

“All drivers, competitors and officials participating in the Championship undertake, on behalf of themselves, their employees, agents and suppliers, to observe all the provisions as supplemented or amended of the International Sporting Code (the Code), the Formula One Technical Regulations (the Technical Regulations) and the present Sporting Regulations together referred to as “the Regulations”.

Pirelli, as a supplier, is therefore required to abide by this code, yet their argument is that they are not under this umbrella.

Interestingly, the example which the Italian tire supplier has chosen to use involves Flavio Briatore’s ban from the sport in the wake of Crashgate in 2009. Briatore was banned from all F1 activities, yet he managed to have this ruling overturned in a Paris court as he was not under the FIA’s jurisdiction, and the Italian supremo now attends many grands prix. The FIA reacted by introducing personnel licenses to the sport, covering this loophole. In this case though, the regulations do seem to be more water-tight.

Similarly, Pirelli and Mercedes are trying to expose flaws in the FIA regulations, and it could well come down to the use of English in making a decision, which is due on Friday after all of the evidence was heard today in Paris.

Have a decent tax refund coming? Buy Ayrton Senna’s 1993 Monaco-winning car

Photos courtesy Bonhams
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Are you expecting a better than normal tax refund? Did you get a very nice bonus from your company due to the new tax cut?

Well, if you have a good chunk of change hanging around and potentially can be in Monaco on May 11, you can have a chance to bid on the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A that the late Ayrton Senna drove in — and won — that year’s Monaco Grand Prix.

We’re not just talking about any race winner. It’s also the same car Senna won his sixth Monaco Grand Prix, and the chassis bears the number six.

It’s also the same car Senna piloted to that season’s F1 championship (his third and final title before sadly being killed the next year) and is the first McLaren driven by Senna that’s ever been sold or put up for auction.

The famed Bonhams auction house is overseeing the sale of the car.

“Any Grand Prix-winning car is important, but to have the golden combination of both Senna and Monaco is a seriously rare privilege indeed,” Bonhams global head of motorsport, Mark Osborne, told The Robb Report.

“Senna and Monaco are historically intertwined, and this car represents the culmination of his achievements at the Monegasque track. This is one of the most significant Grand Prix cars ever to appear at auction, and is certainly the most significant Grand Prix car to be offered since the Fangio Mercedes-Benz W196R, which sold for a world record at auction.”

How much might you need? You might want to get a couple of friends to throw in a few bucks as well.

“We expect the car to achieve a considerable seven-figure sum,” Osborne said.

The London newspaper “The Telegraph” predicts the car will sell in the $6.1 million range.”

“This car will set the world record for a Senna car at auction,” Osborne said. “We are as certain as you can be in the auction world.”

While you won’t be able to take the car for a test drive before the auction, it’ll be ready to roar once you pay the price.

“In theory, the buyer could be racing immediately upon receipt of the cleared funds after the auction,” Osborne said. “All systems are primed and ready.”