Nine hours in, Audi’s No. 2 leads at Le Mans

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The No. 2 Audi R18 E-Tron Quattro of Tom Kristensen, Loic Duval and Allan McNish continues to pace the 24 Hours of Le Mans, but the 4-Rings’ early dominance has taken a hit as the darkness sets in at the Circuit de la Sarthe.

After leading early on, Audi Sport’s No. 1 car for Benoit Treluyer, Marcel Fassler and Andre Lotterer has re-joined the race after being forced to the garage to have its alternator replaced. The issue cost the No. 1 team 11 laps and it is now running 16th overall. As for the No. 3 Audi team of Lucas Di Grassi, Oliver Jarvis and Marc Gene, they have held on to fourth position after suffering damage to its car following a tire puncture. During a recent safety car period, the Audi Sport crew put multiple new pieces of bodywork on the No. 3, including a rear deck, front nose and right side pod.

The two Toyota hybrids continue to stalk the No. 2 Audi, with the No. 8 of Anthony Davidson, Sebastien Buemi and Stephane Sarrazin running second and the No. 7 of Alex Wurz, Nicolas Lapierre and Kazuki Nakajima in third.

In the LMP2 category, two of the Oak Racing Morgan-Nissan machines are leading the way, with the No. 35 of Bertrand Baguette, Martin Plowman and Ricardo Gonzalez ahead of the No. 24 of Olivier Pla, David Heinemeier Hansson and Alex Brundle.

The GTE-Pro class is still being led by Aston Martin Racing, with the No. 99 of Bruno Senna, Frederic Makowiecki and Robert Bell leading its sister car, the No. 97 for Stefan Mucke, Darren Turner and Peter Dumbreck.

Finally, GTE-Am currently features the No. 88 Proton Competition Porsche 911 GT3 RSR of Christian Ried, Gianluca Roda and Paolo Ruberti leading the No. 77 Dempsey Del Piero-Proton Porsche, which is currently being driven by actor Patrick Dempsey.

The “Grey’s Anatomy” star always draws attention, which manifested itself in the team’s most recent driver change from Patrick Long to Dempsey. When Long climbed out of the No. 77, he was compelled to push away some photographers who had crowded around the car, presumably to take a snap of Dempsey getting into the car.

Simon Pagenaud has words with Gabby Chaves after Honda Indy GP of Alabama

Photos: IndyCar
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The rain didn’t stop following the conclusion of the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama, and neither did the jousting between drivers.

An angry Team Penske’s Simon Pagenaud confronted Harding Racing’s Gabby Chaves after the race, complaining that Chaves would not let Pagenaud get past him in the closing laps.

Instead of ending up with a hoped-for Top 5, Pagenaud wound up with a ninth-place finish. Chaves, meanwhile, finished 17th, two laps down.

The confrontation turned into a battle of words and profanity between the two drivers, as captured on Twitter by AutoWeek’s Matt Weaver.

Afterward – and after their tempers cooled down somewhat – both Pagenaud and Chaves gave their sides of the confrontation to NBCSN.

Gabby Chaves

First, here’s Pagenaud’s take on things:

“We had a really good race going,” Pagenaud said. “I think we potentially could have been top 5. I was really frustrated with Gabby. He was two laps down and I was stuck behind him, which gave an opportunity to (Scott) Dixon as I was trying to do everything I could to make it happen.

“It’s a real shame because when it’s not your day, it’s not your day. You’ll have better days later, but you want to have everybody on your side when you have a good day. At the moment, he doesn’t have me on his side, let me tell you. It’s a real shame.”

When asked what exactly he said to Chaves, Pagenaud demurred.

“Driver’s stuff,” he said with a slight smile. “We’ve all been there. I’ve been in his position. My side, I played it smart. It is what it is.

“I can’t comment for him. You can ask him the question. I’m not going to make a deal about it, it’s just a shame it ruined my race. We’ll come back stronger. It’s Indy soon, so that’ll put a smile on my face.”

NBCSN then caught up with Chaves for his side of the story.

 

“It’s a tough situation, we had to restart (the rain-delayed race) a lap down,” Chaves said. “Our whole strategy depends on trying to get a yellow and holding our position. Some guys think that the track belongs only to them, they’re the only guys on-track.

“Everyone else who was faster at that point – we were only one lap down to the leader, so we’re still on our strategy and don’t know what’s going to happen – as soon as they got right up next to me on the lead lap, I let them go.

“Simon was the only one who couldn’t drive up to me. I understand his frustration, but he’s the one who has to save fuel to make his strategy work, that’s not our fault, right?”

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