Audi reigns for fourth consecutive year at Le Mans

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Audi’s dominance continues at the biggest sports car race in the world.

For the fourth consecutive season, the German manufacturer is on the top step of the podium at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, with now nine-time Le Mans winner Tom Kristensen of Denmark taking the checkered flag in the No. 2 Audi R18 E-Tron Quattro along with co-drivers Loic Duval and Allan McNish.

One of Audi’s sister teams, the No. 3 of Oliver Jarvis, Lucas di Grassi, and Marc Gene will join the podium as well, placing third behind the runner-up No. 8 Toyota Hybrid squad of Sebastien Buemi, Stephane Sarrazin and Anthony Davidson.

It was not an altogether perfect race for the Audi camp, with the seventh-hour problems of the No. 1 R18 (Benoit Treluyer, Marcel Fassler and Andre Lotterer) eventually causing it to fall back to fifth place at the finish, 10 laps off the pace of the No. 2. But in a race that battled to achieve a steady rhythm through a staggering amount of safety car periods, the 4-Rings’ combo of Kristensen, McNish and Duval (who put the No. 2 on the pole for this 90th anniversary edition of Le Mans) turned in a tremendous performance.

“They’re all special but this one is amazing,” Audi Sport’s Brad Kettler told SPEED Channel. “The adversity we went through, having the guys work together – just incredible. The competition was amazing. I don’t know what to say, it’ll take me a while to figure it out.”

The subsequent podium celebration for the two Audi teams and the No. 8 Toyota group was a relatively subdued one following the death of Danish driver Allan Simonsen in the first hour of the race yesterday morning.

“They’re all emotional for different reasons – this one was obviously tender after everything that happened in the race, especially with the unfortunate accident at the beginning,” three-time Le Mans winner McNish told SPEED before going to the podium.

“That obviously played a little bit into Tom on the Danish side of things, but from my point of view and [the team’s] point of view, we had to work so hard and be so clean and tidy in difficult weather conditions. That was definitely the toughest, mentally difficult race that I’ve ever done here, without any question.”

For Duval, it is his first triumph at Le Mans in his fifth career start there.

IndyCar 2017 driver review: Ed Carpenter

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MotorSportsTalk continues its annual review of the Verizon IndyCar Series drivers that raced in 2017. The 2017 season behind the wheel was better for Ed Carpenter than either of the last two years, but still wasn’t ideal results-wise in his six oval starts.

Ed Carpenter, No. 20 Ed Carpenter Racing Chevrolet

  • 2016: 25th Place (5 Starts), Best Finish 18th, Best Start 5th, 0 Top-5, 0 Top-10, 1 Lap Led, 11.2 Avg. Start, 21.8 Avg. Finish
  • 2017: 22nd Place (6 Starts), Best Finish 7th, Best Start 2nd, 0 Top-5, 1 Top-10, 5 Laps Led, 11.3 Avg. Start, 12.3 Avg. Finish

Ed Carpenter’s 2017 season was largely one of frustration, both behind the wheel and as a team owner.

While a respectable turnaround in results occurred – Carpenter finished between seventh and 12th in five of his six oval races after a nightmare season of ending 18th or worse in each of his 2016 starts – this is still not what he sets out to strive for in the races he does. Lost opportunities loomed larger than any official result he or the Ed Carpenter Racing team achieved.

Carpenter and new teammate JR Hildebrand, in for the departed Josef Newgarden, dominated preseason testing in Phoenix but Hildebrand could only muster third in the race, Carpenter a season-best seventh. Then at Indianapolis, Carpenter (second) and Hildebrand (sixth) flew the flag for Chevrolet in qualifying and practice pace, but they fell to 11th and 16th on race day owing to a front-wing change and late-race penalty for passing before a restart.

Both drivers got collected in incidents at Texas. Hildebrand qualified and finished a season-best second in Iowa but that result came only after the ECR crew rebuilt his car from a crash in practice. Then Carpenter had a practice crash in Pocono and despite a rapid rebuild, they missed the clock to qualify by mere minutes and were unable to do so. Carpenter’s spin on a slick Gateway track at the start of the race sent him over Will Power’s nose assembly in one of the scarier looking incidents of the year, although fortunately he was OK.

In a similar refrain as we often write, it’s not that Carpenter’s lost his ability to drive and he remains one of the series’ savviest and smartest people in the paddock. There have been a lot of extenuating circumstances of late, and it almost felt as though this team had “empty nest” components. Since September, Carpenter has had to secure his team’s future with a move away from its Speedway, Ind. shop, line up Spencer Pigot for a full-time drive replacing Hildebrand in the No. 21 car, find a new road/street course driver in the No. 20 car, and manage both driving and owning himself.