IndyCar: A salute to cleanliness the last 3 races

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I may be in the minority here, but I’d like to give a round of applause to the entire IZOD IndyCar Series field for putting together three straight races without a single major accident.

Earlier this month, the first half of Detroit race two was frankly awful with six cautions for 22 laps occurring in the first 36 laps in the 70-lap race.

But since that low point, the men and women in the field have driven 228 laps at Texas Motor Speedway, many fighting ill-handling race cars that went south as soon as their tires began falling off, 250 laps at the challenging Milwaukee Mile and 250 laps at the Iowa Speedway without tearing up a single race car.

The only incidents in this stretch? Oriol Servia had a wicked spin but saved it without hitting anything at Texas (pictured). Alex Tagliani has had a pair of spins: one at Milwaukee and one at Iowa, without contacting the wall. Simona de Silvestro and Ana Beatriz each made slight contact at Turn 4 in Milwaukee, but both made it back to the pits.

The only accident that’s tore up a car in the last three weekends was when James Jakes lost control in Turn 2 in his heat race at Iowa, which forced the Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing team to prepare his backup car.

This stretch of six races in five weekends, with two additional weeks at Indianapolis for practice and qualifying before that after returning from Brazil, has been nothing short of a nightmare for crews. It’s a case of mass travel, mass changeover in setups, and extended hours with limited sleep.

Kudos, then, to the drivers who have made sure their crews haven’t needed to do more repair work as a result.

Position of F1 start lights altered to compensate for safety halo

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The position of start lights will be altered on Formula One tracks this season, in a bid to ensure the drivers’ line of vision is not impeded by the controversial halo protection device.

The halo is a titanium structure introduced this year in a bid to ramp up driver safety, forming a ring around the cockpit top. It is designed to protect the drivers’ head from loose debris and offer better safety during eventual collisions.

Although drivers largely understand the need for it, very few like it. They are worried it impedes visibility, it looks ugly and also that fans will no longer be able to identify a driver properly from his race helmet. Drivers also take longer to climb in and out of their cars.

Formula One’s governing body has addressed concerns and asked every circuit “to make the lights at a standard height above the track,” FIA race director Charlie Whiting said.

“Pole position seems to be the worst case scenario with the halo,” Whiting added at the season-opening Australian GP. “Maybe the driver can’t quite see the lights, or see only half of them, and he might have to move his head too much.”

The new start lights were positioned lower for Friday’s first two practice sessions at Albert Park. Drivers were also allowed the rare chance to rehearse grid starts at the end of both sessions.

“We haven’t normally allowed practice starts on the grid here because it’s quite a tight timetable,” Whiting said. “What I thought would be a good idea was to give the driver sight of those lights, rather than for the first time on Sunday evening.”

A repeat set of lights has been moved from its usual position halfway up the grid to a more convenient position to the left.

“Those repeat lights were normally halfway up the grid, and they were fitted round about 2009, when the rear wings became higher on the cars,” Whiting said. “But now the wings have been lowered, there’s no need for those halfway up the grid.”