Quaker State 400 - Practice

Kentucky Update: Red flag out at Lap 49 for multi-car wreck

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After numerous rain showers forced Kentucky Speedway and NASCAR officials to throw in the towel last night, the Quaker State 400 finally got underway this afternoon under partly cloudy skies and in front of a decent but noticeably thinner crowd.

Carl Edwards immediately took the lead from pole sitter Dale Earnhardt Jr. and led all the way up to the Lap 30 competition caution that was announced prior to last night’s rainout. “Cousin Carl” then brought the leaders down pit road for service, but Earnhardt and teammate/Sprint Cup points leader Jimmie Johnson managed to beat Edwards out after they all opted for two-tire stops.

Earnhardt took the Lap 36 restart on the outside lane above Johnson and managed to hold off the five-time Cup champion in a brief battle for the lead. But three laps later, the yellow flew again after a flat tire came apart for Denny Hamlin as he was traveling on the pit access road between Turns 3 and 4. The rubber then went through the grass and hit Earnhardt’s car, then Johnson’s at speed in Turn 4, triggering the race’s second caution period.

Both of them sustained visible front-end damage, but the Hendrick Motorsports duo opted to keep their track positions and led the field back to green at Lap 43. However, almost immediately, Caution No. 3 came along as Kyle Busch spun coming out of Turn 2 while running fifth, causing the field behind him to scatter quickly. Luckily, they were able to evade him and Busch was able to get back going.

Johnson managed to take the lead through all of that and on a Lap 47 restart, he quickly pulled away from Earnhardt, who fell back into the pack. As that was happening, Brad Keselowski (pictured), running 10th at the time, was turned around by Kurt Busch, who was on the tri-oval apron attempting to make the pass. Keselowski then came up the track in Turn 1, where he was hit from behind by an oncoming Greg Biffle. The incident collected seven cars in all and forced the red flag to fly at Lap 49.

“I knew I needed to get to the bottom but my car was a little bit loose getting into [Turn 1] and I just had nowhere to go,” Biffle told TNT afterwards. “I just couldn’t get it turned down to miss [Keselowski].”

TNT later replayed radio transmissions from Kurt Busch, who said the transition from the apron to the banked tri-oval straight caused him to slide into Keselowski, and Jeff Gordon, who called for NASCAR to ban use of the apron.

Keselowski and Travis Kvapil have been checked and released from the infield care center following the wreck.

Jenson Button receives honorary degree from University of Bath (VIDEO)

ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - NOVEMBER 25:  Jenson Button of Great Britain and McLaren Honda in the garage during practice for the Abu Dhabi Formula One Grand Prix at Yas Marina Circuit on November 25, 2016 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.  (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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Jenson Button became ‘Dr. Jenson Button’ earlier this week when he was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Bath in England.

Button, 36, made what looks set to be his final Formula 1 appearance at the end of last month in Abu Dhabi, drawing the curtain on a 16-year stint at the pinnacle of motorsport.

The Briton won the F1 drivers’ championship in 2009 and was runner-up in 2011, as well as winning 15 grands prix.

Button added to his list of achievements by picking up an honorary degree in engineering from the University of Bath earlier this week.

“I didn’t go to university and work hard in my early years, but I would say that a lot of my achievements in motorsport are down to my engineering understanding of a racing car,” Button said when addressing the audience at the ceremony.

Button does have a contract to race for McLaren in 2018 should both he and the driver be keen, but looks unlikely to return.

Button does remain keen to race occasionally through 2017, expressing an interest in racing in Super GT and rallycross.

Williams expecting Stroll to make mistakes through debut F1 season

ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - NOVEMBER 24:  Lance Stroll of Canada and Williams talks in the Paddock  during previews for the Abu Dhabi Formula One Grand Prix at Yas Marina Circuit on November 24, 2016 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Williams Formula 1 chief technical officer Pat Symonds says he expects 18-year-old Lance Stroll to make mistakes during his rookie season in 2017.

Williams announced last month that Stroll would be stepping up from Formula 3 to a full-time F1 seat for 2017, replacing the retiring Felipe Massa.

Stroll has an impressive track record through his junior racing career, becoming the youngest ever FIA F3 champion in 2016.

However, his on-track actions have caught attention for the wrong reasons at times, with the Canadian receiving a race ban in June 2015 for causing an accident.

Speaking to Reuters, Symonds said that Williams is braced for Stroll to make mistakes during his rookie campaign as he gets to grips with life in F1.

“Of course he’ll make mistakes and we’ll be repairing cars. These things happen as part of the process,” Symonds said.

“If you look at his Formula 3 career, in 2015 he was having quite a few accidents in that. The Monza one is just staggering.”

However, Symonds has no doubt in Stroll’s talent, believing the youngster to have proven himself during his two-year stint in F3.

“He hasn’t won that championship with anything other than a lot of skill and maturity,” Symonds said.

“For a guy that young, he’s driven really well in pretty well every condition. He’s raced well, he’s led at the front. He’s come through the field a bit, he’s driven well in the wet.

“He is the real deal.”

Besides his F3 commitments, Stroll has also completed an extensive F1 testing program through 2016 that saw him conduct running in a 2014-spec Williams in order to prepare him for his race debut in Australia next March.

Ecclestone: Rosberg not among F1 greats, ‘a world champion and nothing else’

ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - NOVEMBER 27:  Nico Rosberg of Germany and Mercedes GP celebrates finishing second on the podium and winning the World Drivers Championship during the Abu Dhabi Formula One Grand Prix at Yas Marina Circuit on November 27, 2016 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.  (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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Formula 1 CEO Bernie Ecclestone does not believe that the recently-retired Nico Rosberg will be remembered as one of the sport’s all-time greats, saying that the German is “a world champion and nothing else”.

Rosberg won his maiden F1 drivers’ championship two weeks ago in Abu Dhabi before sensationally announcing his immediate retirement from racing just five days later.

The news came as a shock to the F1 community, including Ecclestone, and has raised questions about the legacy that Rosberg will leave.

Speaking to Press Trust of India, Ecclestone said that he would not place Rosberg in the same realm as many of his peers who have won multiple titles, including Lewis Hamilton, Sebastian Vettel and Fernando Alonso.

“Let’s just say he is a world champion. The other names that you mentioned have obviously won more than a few times and have achieved more,” Ecclestone said.

“So I would just call Nico a world champion and nothing else.”

Ecclestone did concede that not having the defending World Champion on the F1 grid in 2017 would not help the sport, a situation that has not arisen since 1994 following Alain Prost’s final title win.

“[He’s] not as popular as Lewis but Nico was a very popular driver,” Ecclestone said.

“So his absence is certainly not good for Formula 1.”

Rosberg became the fourth driver to retire after winning the World Championship, following in the footsteps of Prost (1993), Jackie Stewart (1973) and Mike Hawthorn (1958).

2017 MotoGP calendar tweaked as German GP changes date

VALENCIA, SPAIN - NOVEMBER 13:  The MotoGP riders start from the grid during the MotoGP race during the MotoGP of Valencia - Race at Ricardo Tormo Circuit on November 13, 2016 in Valencia, Spain.  (Photo by Mirco Lazzari gp/Getty Images)
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The calendar for the 2017 MotoGP season has been subject to a minor tweak following a date change for the German Grand Prix at the Sachsenring.

The provisional schedule for next year was released back in September, with 18 rounds listed in a similar fashion to the 2016 calendar.

The biggest change for 2017 was the removal of the back-to-back round between the races in Argentina and Austin, Texas, with many encountering travel difficulties en route from Termas de Rio Hondo.

In an updated schedule released by MotoGP on Wednesday, the German Grand Prix has now been brought forward by one week to create a longer summer break.

The race at the Sachsenring in Saxony will now take place on July 2, going back-to-back with the TT Assen race in the Netherlands and create a month’s gap to the next race in the Czech Republic.

The date of the United States Grand Prix at the Circuit of The Americas remains unchanged, taking place on April 23.

2017 MotoGP provisional calendar

1. Qatar – March 26
2. Argentina – April 9
3. USA – April 23
4. Spain – May 7
5. France – May 21
6. Italy – June 4
7. Catalunya – June 11
8. Netherlands – June 25
9. Germany – July 2
10. Czech Republic – August 6
11. Austria – August 13
12. Great Britain – August 27
13. San Marino – September 10
14. Aragon – September 24
15. Japan – October 15
16. Australia – October 22
17. Malaysia – October 29
18. Valencia – November 12