Webber holds his tongue over latest F1 row

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Normally outspoken Red Bull driver Mark Webber held back when asked to comment on F1’s latest row over tires.

Webber, who announced over the weekend he will retire from F1 at the end of the year, finished second in a race which saw a spate of high-speed tire failures.

Asked about his view on driving in such risky circumstances, he said: “Well the team are trying to keep us up to date as best they can.”

“Obviously it’s a little bit of a moving target for them as well. They are doing their job to inform us as much as they can. It’s not a slow circuit, it’s very quick, we’re committed to the high-speed stuff here, 100 per cent most of the time.”

“It’s not December yet, so I’ll stay quiet,” he added.

Webber did say the drivers have had difficulty getting the sport’s governing body to listen to their views: “I think we’ve been trying to have input for the last three years and it’s deaf ears.”

“Anyway, we’re part of the package, part of the show. The show goes on by the looks of it.”

The Red Bull driver admitted he did adjust his driving line to avoid some of the curbs that were suspected of contributing to the tire failures:

“You want to still push as hard as possible but you have to check your line a bit, change your trajectory, the radius is tighter, obviously, in certain corners, i.e. the quick stuff, Copse, Stowe, turn one, staying away from there.

“It turns out maybe it wasn’t really the curbs, who knows but it’s just better to factor in everything that you possibly can.”

Position of F1 start lights altered to compensate for safety halo

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The position of start lights will be altered on Formula One tracks this season, in a bid to ensure the drivers’ line of vision is not impeded by the controversial halo protection device.

The halo is a titanium structure introduced this year in a bid to ramp up driver safety, forming a ring around the cockpit top. It is designed to protect the drivers’ head from loose debris and offer better safety during eventual collisions.

Although drivers largely understand the need for it, very few like it. They are worried it impedes visibility, it looks ugly and also that fans will no longer be able to identify a driver properly from his race helmet. Drivers also take longer to climb in and out of their cars.

Formula One’s governing body has addressed concerns and asked every circuit “to make the lights at a standard height above the track,” FIA race director Charlie Whiting said.

“Pole position seems to be the worst case scenario with the halo,” Whiting added at the season-opening Australian GP. “Maybe the driver can’t quite see the lights, or see only half of them, and he might have to move his head too much.”

The new start lights were positioned lower for Friday’s first two practice sessions at Albert Park. Drivers were also allowed the rare chance to rehearse grid starts at the end of both sessions.

“We haven’t normally allowed practice starts on the grid here because it’s quite a tight timetable,” Whiting said. “What I thought would be a good idea was to give the driver sight of those lights, rather than for the first time on Sunday evening.”

A repeat set of lights has been moved from its usual position halfway up the grid to a more convenient position to the left.

“Those repeat lights were normally halfway up the grid, and they were fitted round about 2009, when the rear wings became higher on the cars,” Whiting said. “But now the wings have been lowered, there’s no need for those halfway up the grid.”