Crossover gate, fencing significantly strengthened at Daytona after February’s near-tragedy

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Rising from near-tragedy in February when dozens of parts of a demolished race car – including a tire – flew into the stands, injuring more than two dozen spectators, Daytona International Speedway will be a much safer place for this weekend’s return of racing.

Just in time for Friday’s Nationwide Series race, the same racing circuit in which a terrible wreck occurred back in February when Kyle Larson’s car was all but obliterated, track officials have reinforced and reconfigured the crossover gate and grandstand fencing protecting fans from race track debris, according to a story in the Savannah (Ga.) Morning News.

Significant safety improvements were made to both Daytona and sister track Talladega Superspeedway – the only two tracks on the NASCAR circuit that require restrictor plates to control horsepower on both Sprint Cup and Nationwide Series cars.

Following a study by a structural engineering firm, numerous improvements and upgrades were implemented, including more cables to keep the crossover gates in place, as well as additional tethers surrounding the crossover gate and support posts.

“I felt before that it was safe place,” track president Joie Chitwood III said. “We’ve been around 55 years and, yes, things happen.

“But we’ve done a really good job of giving fans a safe and fun environment. You never stop doing that.”

All eight crossover gates – which allow fans access to the track during pre-race activities and for pit tours when cars are not on the track – have been either replaced or strengthened.

Here’s a video replay of February’s near-tragedy:

Hamilton: Abu Dhabi ‘the last race with good-looking cars’ in F1

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Lewis Hamilton believes that this weekend’s Abu Dhabi Grand Prix will be remembered as the last race with good-looking Formula 1 cars ahead of the introduction of the ‘Halo’ cockpit protection for next year.

Officials from the FIA and F1 Strategy Group confirmed earlier this year that the Halo would be fitted to all cars from the 2018 season in a bid to improve safety standards, with the deaths of Justin Wilson and Jules Bianchi putting head protection high on the agenda for the series’ chiefs.

Hamilton has long made his opposition to the Halo clear, believing it will ruin the look of F1 cars, and echoed his thoughts ahead of the final Halo-less race in Abu Dhabi this weekend.

“It’s the last year of looking good I think in the cars. It’s the last race where the cars will look good,” Hamilton said.

“I think next year, it’s all downhill from there in terms of how they look.

“But safety will go up at least, and maybe it could be successful in some way.”

Hamilton’s F1 title rival Sebastian Vettel was less bothered about the change, believing the field will adjust and move on.

“The cars will look different next year. Everything I’ve seen so far looks different, but on the other hand it is something we all get used to,” Vettel said.

“But no doubt the cars look better now, but we’ll get used to it, and we’ll work on the aesthetics so it can be better. It is less of a big deal.”

Red Bull’s Daniel Ricciardo shared Vettel’s view, saying: “I don’t think it’s gonna be as dramatic as most people make it out to be.”