Even in good times, Kenseth maintains “sense of urgency”

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This much is obvious: With four wins to his credit (including one last weekend at Kentucky), Matt Kenseth’s decision to jump to Joe Gibbs Racing over the off-season has been great so far.

But even though any bit of trepidation about the move should have evaporated by now, the former Sprint Cup champion said earlier this week at Daytona International Speedway – site of tonight’s Coke Zero 400 – that he still feels pressure every week to perform well for his new team.

“I don’t know that it ever totally goes away,” said Kenseth, who will start on the front row tonight alongside JGR teammate Kyle Busch. “I think that in this sport in general, you always have to have that sense of urgency and I don’t think you could ever get too comfortable. Everybody can be replaced and you have to perform each and every week. It’s a really ‘what have you done for me lately’ sport, obviously.

“I don’t know that you ever get 100 percent comfortable in what you’re doing. I think you have to stay hungry and always be focused on what’s in front of you and not necessarily what’s behind you.”

But Kenseth also feels a high sense of confidence going into tonight’s 400-miler, as he should. The Wisconsin native has become one of the drivers to beat whenever the Cup circus visits a restrictor plate track, collecting two wins and leading 473 total laps across the last six plate races at both Daytona and Talladega Superspeedway.

“I feel real good about it,” said Kenseth of his chances. “I’ve been really spoiled honestly the last year and a half –  the last six plate races. Our cars have just been unbelievable.”

As for what he expects to see tonight, Kenseth feels that the race may play out as a cross between the season-opening Daytona 500 and the race at Talladega back in May. Those events were decidedly different, with the former marked by long stretches of single-file racing and the latter seeing lots of pack racing.

“Probably more like Talladega – I’m not sure why,” he said. “I’m not sure why Talladega would’ve been different other than just people learn more about the [Gen 6] cars – getting the cars better – figure out how to put them in different positions in situations to make more passing and more side-by-side. I’m not sure.

“You know in February [at Daytona], the groove was right around the top and you couldn’t really do much different than that and [at] Talladega, it wasn’t at all. It was actually – it didn’t seem like you wanted to be way up there. So, we’ll kind of have to wait and see.”

‘Still quite early’ for Ricciardo to think about Red Bull F1 future

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Daniel Ricciardo feels it is “still quite early” to make a decision about his Red Bull Formula 1 future despite seeing teammate Max Verstappen announce on Friday he would be staying with the team until 2020.

Verstappen, 20, put pen to paper on an enhanced F1 contract with Red Bull, with his previous deal due to expire at the end of next season in parallel to Ricciardo’s own agreement.

Ricciardo was asked following practice on Friday why he is yet to strike a new deal for himself with Red Bull, and explained he is in no rush to make a final decision when he has over a year to run on his current contract.

“It’s not that I’ve said no to anything. It’s just still quite early I think,” Ricciardo explained.

“People talked a little bit about contracts and the silly season for next year, but I thought that would still happen next year. It’s still quite early.

“If I’m to try and extract some positives out of his news it’s that it gives us good confidence for next year. He and his management see a lot of positives in the team to continue like that.

“I’m 100 per cent here next year, I can at least say that, and I think it gives both of us confidence that we’ll keep progressing the way we are.”

Red Bull said upon announcing Verstappen’s new deal that it wants to “build a team around him”, with the 20-year-old standing out as a once-in-a-generation talent.

The focus surrounding Verstappen has not left Ricciardo feeling as though he is in the shade or in any way playing second-fiddle to the Dutchman, stressing he has no internal concerns at Red Bull.

“For sure, as far as media goes, he certainly gets a lot of attention. He’s broken records for his age and things like that, so rightly so,” Ricciardo said.

“Take the media out of it, as far as inside the team, new parts on the car, things like this, there’s always been parity and equality.”

Verstappen is only the third driver to commit to a deal beyond the end of next season, following Sebastian Vettel at Ferrari and Fernando Alonso at McLaren on multi-year contracts.

All 10 F1 teams have at least one free seat for 2019, making Ricciardo a possible candidate for seats with either Mercedes or Ferrari were he to consider a move away from Red Bull.

Speaking to British broadcaster Sky Sports, Red Bull F1 advisor Helmut Marko said he felt Ricciardo was “putting himself on the market” by waiting to make a decision on his future, but that talks would take place when possible.