Johnson stays ahead of crash-filled finale, wins at Daytona (VIDEO)

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In a green-white-checkered finish, Jimmie Johnson stayed ahead of multiple melees that ensued on the final lap to win the Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway – becoming the first driver to sweep both the Daytona 500 and DIS’ summer 400-miler in the same year since Bobby Allison did it in 1982.

Johnson led 93 of 160 laps en route to the win, which increased his lead in the Sprint Cup championship to 49 points over Clint Bowyer.

“I don’t know if I really made a bad move tonight, so I’m pretty proud of that,” Johnson told TNT in Victory Lane. “I had a great horse to ride…When I was growing up in California, I watched Bobby Allison and I remember where I was the day [Bobby’s son] Davey passed away. That’s how much the Allison name meant to me.

“To do anything that Bobby’s done is pretty special.”

Kevin Harvick was third, followed by Bowyer in fourth and Michael Waltrip in fifth.

Johnson was leading Tony Stewart when the first of two multi-car incidents on Lap 161 was triggered by contact in Turn 1 involving Casey Mears and Carl Edwards. Because it took place well behind the leaders, NASCAR opted not to throw the yellow and let the field race to the checkered flag.

That battle went to Johnson, but as the five-time Sprint Cup champion was crossing the line in first, another wreck was happening farther back in the tri-oval. The second incident appeared to begin with contact between Danica Patrick and David Ragan, which turned Patrick into another car. When the smoke finally cleared, ten cars were involved in the crash, including Kyle Busch and Ryan Newman.

Multiple reports from NASCAR and media members at Daytona say that all drivers involved in the last-lap incidents are OK.

The G-W-C finish came about after two previous accidents within the final 11 laps.

With five laps to go, Johnson and teammate Kasey Kahne were battling for the lead when third-place driver Marcos Ambrose made contact with the five-time Sprint Cup champion in an apparent attempt to pass in the middle lane. That sent Ambrose into Kahne, who was sent skidding hard into the backstretch wall to bring out what would be the final yellow of the night.

“Jimmie moved up and blocked the outside row coming, so at that point, I had the lead,” Kahne told TNT. “I had followed Jimmie a lot throughout the race and felt really good, and the next thing I know, I get slammed. That’s kind of how these [restrictor-plate] races go – you don’t have a lot of control over some of the things that happen here.”

The Johnson/Ambrose/Kahne dust-up followed a multi-car incident with 11 laps to go that brought out the red flag. Coming out of Turn 4, Denny Hamlin tacked left then shot right into the tri-oval wall. Matt Kenseth barely dodged Hamlin but A.J. Allmendinger was unable to and sent the No. 11 Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota into the air briefly before it came to rest on the infield grass. The spinning Kenseth would collect Jeff Gordon and Dave Blaney as well.

Hamlin and Allmendinger were eventually checked and released from the infield care center.

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

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Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.