F1’s golden oldies

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NASCAR driver Morgan Shepherd is set to make history this weekend by becoming the oldest driver ever to compete in the series. The 71-year-old will join the field at New Hampshire.

In his eighth decade, Shepherd outstrips by far the oldest drivers who’ve successfully competed in Formula One:

Oldest F1 driver to… start a race
Louis Chiron: 55 years, 309 days

The record for the oldest driver ever to compete in a Formula One race belongs to Louis Chiron. He was over a decade and a half Shepherd’s junior when he started the 1955 Monaco Grand Prix for Lancia. Chiron completed 95 of the 100 laps and finished sixth.

Oldest F1 driver to… win a race
Luigi Fagioli: 53 years, 35 days

The ‘Abruzzi robber’ reluctantly handed his Alfa-Romeo to team mate Juan-Manuel Fangio at Reims in 1951, who went on to win. Fagioli shared the triumph, also becoming the oldest driver ever to finish on the podium. But he turned his back on grand prix racing after that race, and died after a crash at Monaco the following year.

Oldest F1 driver to… set pole position
Giuseppe Farina: 47 years, 90 days

The original world champion put his Ferrari on pole position for the Argentinean Grand Prix in 1954. But he finished second in the race to his former team mate – and home hero – Fangio.

Oldest F1 driver to… win the world championship
Juan Manuel Fangio: 46 years, 53 days

The driver even his rivals called ‘Maestro’ won his fifth and final world championship with one of the finest drives the sport has ever seen. Driving his Maserati 250F at the Nurburgring Nordschleife, Fangio overcame a huge delay during a mid-race pit stop to catch and pass the Ferraris of Mike Hawthorn and Peter Collins to win the race and the title.

Oldest F1 driver to… start the last race
Mark Webber, 36 years, 323 says

Formula One is a young man’s game these days. But Webber can console himself with the thought that he’s little more than half Morgan Shepherd’s age, so he still has a lot more racing left in him.

Takuma Sato’s likeness revealed on Borg-Warner Trophy (PHOTOS)

Photos; Walt Kuhn
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INDIANAPOLIS – Rather than the traditional December unveil, this year’s reveal newest likeness added to the Borg-Warner Trophy came Tuesday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum.

Takuma Sato got to see the result of the sculpting done by William Behrends and then turned from wax, clay and ceramic into sterling silver on Tuesday evening, as the winner of the 101st Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil saw his face revealed on the trophy.

Sato took the No. 26 Ruoff Home Mortgage Honda for Andretti Autosport to the win in thrilling fashion this year over Helio Castroneves, denying the Brazilian his fourth Indianapolis 500 victory in the process. It atoned for his near-miss in 2012, driving for Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing, the team he’ll return to in 2018.

It’s been a whirlwind last week-plus for Sato, doing the podium interviews at the Japanese Grand Prix, reflecting on his Indianapolis 500 triumph, then sharing the victory spoils with another Japanese pilot in Yoshihide Muroya, who won the Red Bull Air Race World Championship at Indianapolis this weekend.

Photos of Sato’s face on the most unique trophy in sports are below. This post will be updated following tonight’s full unveil. (All photos: Walt Kuhn)