Kevin Harvick to drive No. 4 Chevy at Stewart-Haas; Ryan Newman moving on

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As Stewart-Haas Racing prepares to welcome Kevin Harvick next season, Ryan Newman will be looking for a new ride.

Harvick and Budweiser, his primary sponsor at Richard Childress Racing, are both making the jump to SHR as the California native will drive the No. 4 Budweiser Chevrolet starting in 2014.

“I think for me, the Stewart-Haas piece was intriguing just for the fact that you have Tony [Stewart] as a teammate,” Harvick said about what made SHR a better option for him.

“…We have a friendship that goes beyond the race track and I think obviously, [SHR co-owner] Gene Haas makes it very intriguing with the guarantees that he made to make the deal happen to put the car on the race track. When you have a family and you start seeing those guarantees of sponsorship for the car, it makes you think about things.

“I think not only those two pieces, but the Hendrick [Motorsports] tie-in with the engines and the support – understanding that, I think the potential is really high with all those resources and relationships and things that go with it.”

But with Stewart also confirming that his team was not ready to expand to a fourth program, that means Newman – who has raced with SHR since its inception in 2009 – will officially be a free agent at season’s end.

“Unfortunately, this will be the last year that we have Ryan with us,” said Stewart. “That’s probably what has made this a bittersweet day. I’m bringing in another one of my friends to the organization, but also knowing that I’m losing a friend at the end of the year to the organization.

“The No. 1 thing when Ryan and I spoke is that our friendship will not change. This was a business decision that was [team co-owner] Gene’s [Haas] as well as mine, and it was a hard decision.”

Newman, who has won three times in his five-year run with SHR, said that he was notified by Stewart of the decision on Wednesday. Commenting on the subject, Newman also made sure to emphasize his friendship with the three-time Cup champion but admitted that he had no idea about what his future may hold.

“That is something that weighs on my shoulders,” he said. “I have a little homework to do. That is part of racing and part of the situation that I’m in. I can’t say that I’m happy with how everything unfolded. I know that there are business decisions and business decisions sometimes trump friendships.

“I don’t feel like that was the case, but in the end, I’m happy with the three wins that I’ve had so far with Stewart-Haas and the performance and the cars and everything else. There will be a change for me in 2014 and I don’t know what that change is.”

Newman has collected 16 victories in his 11-year Cup career. His most recent one came with SHR at Martinsville in April of 2012.

IndyCar 2017 driver review: Ed Carpenter

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MotorSportsTalk continues its annual review of the Verizon IndyCar Series drivers that raced in 2017. The 2017 season behind the wheel was better for Ed Carpenter than either of the last two years, but still wasn’t ideal results-wise in his six oval starts.

Ed Carpenter, No. 20 Ed Carpenter Racing Chevrolet

  • 2016: 25th Place (5 Starts), Best Finish 18th, Best Start 5th, 0 Top-5, 0 Top-10, 1 Lap Led, 11.2 Avg. Start, 21.8 Avg. Finish
  • 2017: 22nd Place (6 Starts), Best Finish 7th, Best Start 2nd, 0 Top-5, 1 Top-10, 5 Laps Led, 11.3 Avg. Start, 12.3 Avg. Finish

Ed Carpenter’s 2017 season was largely one of frustration, both behind the wheel and as a team owner.

While a respectable turnaround in results occurred – Carpenter finished between seventh and 12th in five of his six oval races after a nightmare season of ending 18th or worse in each of his 2016 starts – this is still not what he sets out to strive for in the races he does. Lost opportunities loomed larger than any official result he or the Ed Carpenter Racing team achieved.

Carpenter and new teammate JR Hildebrand, in for the departed Josef Newgarden, dominated preseason testing in Phoenix but Hildebrand could only muster third in the race, Carpenter a season-best seventh. Then at Indianapolis, Carpenter (second) and Hildebrand (sixth) flew the flag for Chevrolet in qualifying and practice pace, but they fell to 11th and 16th on race day owing to a front-wing change and late-race penalty for passing before a restart.

Both drivers got collected in incidents at Texas. Hildebrand qualified and finished a season-best second in Iowa but that result came only after the ECR crew rebuilt his car from a crash in practice. Then Carpenter had a practice crash in Pocono and despite a rapid rebuild, they missed the clock to qualify by mere minutes and were unable to do so. Carpenter’s spin on a slick Gateway track at the start of the race sent him over Will Power’s nose assembly in one of the scarier looking incidents of the year, although fortunately he was OK.

In a similar refrain as we often write, it’s not that Carpenter’s lost his ability to drive and he remains one of the series’ savviest and smartest people in the paddock. There have been a lot of extenuating circumstances of late, and it almost felt as though this team had “empty nest” components. Since September, Carpenter has had to secure his team’s future with a move away from its Speedway, Ind. shop, line up Spencer Pigot for a full-time drive replacing Hildebrand in the No. 21 car, find a new road/street course driver in the No. 20 car, and manage both driving and owning himself.