Bourdais breaks through, finishes 2nd in Toronto Race 1 (VIDEO)

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Normally, it would be a bit odd to see the second-place driver doing burnouts as if he had won the race. But after being unable to log a Top-10 result in the IZOD IndyCar Series’ first 11 races this season, Sebastien Bourdais can be excused for his smoky donuts after his runner-up performance in Race 1 of the Honda Indy Toronto weekend.

“It just feels like after everything we went through, to be on the podium just feels like a million wins,” Bourdais told NBC Sports Network after claiming his first podium finish since winning the 2007 Champ Car season finale at Mexico City to cap off his fourth consecutive series title.

“I can’t thank these guys enough for giving me the opportunity and for sticking with me. It’s been a rough ride so far, so hopefully, we can turn this thing around and it’s all good from now on.”

Equally jubilant was his Dragon Racing team owner, Jay Penske, whose team has battled through a trying campaign up to this point with Bourdais and Sebastian Saavedra.

“It’s just an incredible feeling for our whole team,” Penske said to NBCSN. “We’ve worked so hard for it. This is just a great step forward for the team.”

Bourdais started second and was a contender throughout the day. He took the lead from pole sitter Dario Franchitti on Lap 22 and held it until just after the first cycle of pit stops ended, when Will Power got by him for P1 at Lap 32.

The Frenchman was running in third up to his final stop at Lap 63, which enabled him to get by Will Power for second place but also placed him on the quicker-but-softer red alternate tires. A restart at Lap 65 bunched up the field, and on the restart at Lap 70, Bourdais got the jump on leader Scott Dixon.

However, with no push-to-pass boosts left to protect his lead, Bourdais was unable to hold off a hard-charging Dixon on the black primary tires. Using one of his two remaining boosts on the back stretch, Dixon made the race-winning pass on Bourdais with eight laps remaining.

But that did nothing to dampen the spirits of Bourdais afterwards, who admitted that being at the front was a nerve-wracking experience.

“It was like, ‘What’s gonna happen again?’,” he said. “I was just so stressed out because we’ve had so many good runs but never the end result. It just feels so sweet to be here right now.”

The only real issue for Bourdais this afternoon would appear to be his runner-up trophy, as the crystal cup fell off the base and smashed to pieces just after he claimed it (see above).

One awkward moment later, he simply raised the base to the cheers of the crowd. Trophies can be broken, but the memories of today will surely endure for one of American open-wheel racing’s finest.

Hamilton: Abu Dhabi ‘the last race with good-looking cars’ in F1

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Lewis Hamilton believes that this weekend’s Abu Dhabi Grand Prix will be remembered as the last race with good-looking Formula 1 cars ahead of the introduction of the ‘Halo’ cockpit protection for next year.

Officials from the FIA and F1 Strategy Group confirmed earlier this year that the Halo would be fitted to all cars from the 2018 season in a bid to improve safety standards, with the deaths of Justin Wilson and Jules Bianchi putting head protection high on the agenda for the series’ chiefs.

Hamilton has long made his opposition to the Halo clear, believing it will ruin the look of F1 cars, and echoed his thoughts ahead of the final Halo-less race in Abu Dhabi this weekend.

“It’s the last year of looking good I think in the cars. It’s the last race where the cars will look good,” Hamilton said.

“I think next year, it’s all downhill from there in terms of how they look.

“But safety will go up at least, and maybe it could be successful in some way.”

Hamilton’s F1 title rival Sebastian Vettel was less bothered about the change, believing the field will adjust and move on.

“The cars will look different next year. Everything I’ve seen so far looks different, but on the other hand it is something we all get used to,” Vettel said.

“But no doubt the cars look better now, but we’ll get used to it, and we’ll work on the aesthetics so it can be better. It is less of a big deal.”

Red Bull’s Daniel Ricciardo shared Vettel’s view, saying: “I don’t think it’s gonna be as dramatic as most people make it out to be.”