Lack of options to save Massa’s Ferrari career?

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It’s that time of year again, folks. ‘Silly season’ got off to a rather explosive start on the Thursday of the British Grand Prix when Mark Webber confirmed his retirement from the sport at the end of the season, beginning the domino effect on the 2014 driver market. Kimi Raikkonen, Daniel Ricciardo and Jean-Eric Vergne are the three drivers in the running for this seat, but this in turn opens up a seat at either Lotus or Toro Rosso. The latter would most probably be filled by rising star Antonio Felix da Costa, and with Nico Hulkenberg in talks with Lotus, he may be off to Enstone should Raikkonen leave. Keeping up?

After another disappointing performance at the Nurburgring, the sharks are now beginning to sniff around Felipe Massa at Ferrari – just as they have for the last three or four years. The Brazilian, who came second in the 2008 drivers’ championship, has been outclassed by teammate Fernando Alonso during their four years together at the team, leaving many to question Massa’s position in Maranello. Furthermore, Ferrari’s reluctance to give him anything longer than a one year contract extension may suggest the same, with a fine run at the end of 2012 securing his place with the team for this season. Could his number finally be up, though?

It comes down to the available drivers. Ironically, Mark Webber’s availability would have suited Ferrari twelve months ago, but the Australian snubbed the move in favor of playing second-fiddle to Vettel once again this year.

Despite there being a plethora of young drivers champing at the bit for a place in Formula One, there appears to be a lack of ‘Ferrari quality’ in the mix-up. The one-time natural replacement for Massa – Nico Hulkenberg – has endured a poor start to the season due to the Sauber C32’s lack of pace, yet his performances have been good to drag it into the points. He may be in talks with Lotus, but would Ferrari be willing to hijack a deal to bring him to Maranello?

A second mooted option is Paul di Resta, although he is lacking a ‘stand out’ result during his two-and-a-half year F1 career so far. Without a podium, it is very hard to Ferrari to take on a driver, and many would also question quite whether he fits in with the team’s ‘image’. A driver who may tick this final box is Ferrari Driver Academy member Jules Bianchi, yet he too lacks any real record having competed in just nine races for Marussia so far.

Without wishing to write off the rest of Massa’s season, the popular Brazilian may be aided by a lack of options for Ferrari. Silly season still has a long summer to play out though, potentially changing the face of next year’s grid once again.

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

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Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.