It’s been 10 years since Alonso’s first win, at Hungary in 2003

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The question when Fernando Alonso moved to Renault in 2003 was not if he’d get his first Grand Prix victory, but when. This year marks 10 years since that question was answered, at the 2003 Hungarian Grand Prix.

From pole, Alonso leapt away from slow-starting second and third-placed Ralf Schumacher and Mark Webber (amazing how some things never change, Webber with a poor start).

Alonso lapped both his teammate Jarno Trulli and, at that time, the five-time overall and three-time defending World Champion Michael Schumacher. Only the top six cars finished on the lead lap as Alonso scored his first career victory to become F1’s youngest ever winner, aged 22.

The podium of Alonso, Kimi Raikkonen and Juan Pablo Montoya was heralded as a “changing of the guard” in F1 and it appeared for the balance of 2003 that either Raikkonen or Montoya would be able to beat Schumacher to the championship. Alas, the Ferrari driver held on.

But much has changed. Alonso, who turns 32 on July 29, has 32 career victories and that places him in fourth place all-time. Still, that mark is just two wins ahead of Sebastian Vettel, who eclipsed Alonso’s youngest to win record with his own win in the 2008 Italian Grand Prix at 21.

Renault, which Alonso drove for then, is now Lotus, Raikkonen’s home at least for the rest of 2013. Of course it was Alonso who replaced Raikkonen at Ferrari, and has struggled to dial in the car’s performance to match Vettel and Red Bull – a driver and team that in 2003, didn’t even exist!

Vettel was just 16 at the time and Red Bull was Jaguar, with a one Mark Webber in his first year at that team. And it’s Vettel who has as many World Championships – three – as does that 2003 Hungarian GP podium (Alonso two and Raikkonen one).

The other bit of stat nerddom to come out of that race was Zsolt Baumgartner making his debut for Jordan, the first and thus far only Hungarian driver in F1 history. He did so at his home Grand Prix but retired with an engine failure halfway through the race.

Toyota victorious in Bahrain on Porsche’s LMP1 swansong

Toyota Motorsport GmbH
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SAKHIR, Bahrain – Toyota denied Porsche a swansong victory in its final LMP1 appearance in the FIA World Endurance Championship by taking a commanding win in the 6 Hours of Bahrain on Saturday.

Porsche started from pole in the last competitive outing for the three-time Le Mans-winning 919 Hybrid car, only to lose out to Toyota’s Sebastien Buemi within the first half an hour of the race.

Porsche lost one of its cars from contention for victory after an errant bollard got stuck underneath Timo Bernhard’s No. 2 entry, leaving Nick Tandy to lead its charge in the No. 1 car.

Tandy moved into the lead just past half distance after a bold strategy call from Porsche to triple-stint the Briton after a fuel-only stop, vaulting him ahead of Anthony Davidson in the No. 8 Toyota.

Tandy’s win hopes were soon dashed when he tangled with a GTE-Am backmarker at Turn 1, sustaining damage that forced Porsche into an unplanned pit stop that put the car a lap down.

With the No. 7 Toyota losing two laps following a clash with a GTE-Pro car earlier on, Davidson, Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima went unchallenged en route to the car’s fifth victory of the season.

Porsche rounded out the podium with its cars, with the No. 2 leading home the No. 1, leaving Toyota’s No. 7 car to settle for P4 at the checkered flag.

Vaillante Rebellion clinched the title in LMP2 after a stunning fightback led by Bruno Senna, with the Brazilian securing his maiden motorsport championship win in the process.

GTE-Pro saw AF Corse complete a hat-trick of titles in 2017, with James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi wining the class’ first world championship recognized by the FIA, while Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Mathias Lauda sewed up the GTE-Am title.