Coke Zero 400 - Qualifying

Tony Stewart downplays wild sprint car crash (VIDEO)

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On Monday night, Tony Stewart flipped over multiple times during a sprint car race at the Ohsweken Speedway dirt track in Ontario, Canada. Four days later at Pocono Raceway, he told the NASCAR media that while he appreciated their concern, they had made too much hubbub over the incident.

“You mortals have got to learn – you guys need to watch more sprint car videos and stuff,” Stewart said on Friday. “It was not a big deal. It’s starting to get annoying this week about that, so that was just an average sprint car wreck. When they wreck, they get upside down like that. That was not a big deal.”

In fact, Stewart said the worst part about the crash in Canada was that it impacted his racing schedule. With only one new sprint car currently available to him, he was forced to bow out of two events this weekend in order to fulfill obligations for races next week.

“I guarantee you, there were 15-20 guys across the country that flipped just like that this weekend and were just fine – just like we were,” he continued. “If it’s bad, we will let you guys know. That was not bad at all. I raced the next night and ran fifth at the World of Outlaws race. It was not bad.”

With that settled, Stewart – like multiple other drivers – is focusing on securing his place in the Chase this weekend at Pocono. He currently holds one of the two Wild Card spots that will enter the post-season along with the Top 10 in the Sprint Cup standings following the Sept. 7 race at Richmond International Raceway.

Stewart said that his team looks at the Chase situation in the same way as everybody else in the garage, but that it doesn’t matter if they make it in and then do nothing in the final ten races.

“We are still looking at, ‘What do we have to do to make things better?,'” he said. “If we get our cars working like we want them to, the points will take care of itself.

“I don’t think we are looking at it in any type of panic situation. We are still just trying to figure out how to make our cars better.”

Ricciardo, Magnussen get updated Renault power units for Monaco

MONTMELO, SPAIN - MAY 17:  Daniel Ricciardo of Australia drives the  Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer as he exits the pit lane during day one of Formula One testing at Circuit de Catalunya on May 17, 2016 in Montmelo, Spain.  (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)
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Daniel Ricciardo and Kevin Magnussen will race with updated power units at this weekend’s Monaco Grand Prix after Renault allocated one to each of the teams it supplies.

Red Bull and Renault tested the updated power unit in Barcelona last week ahead of its planned introduction at the Canadian Grand Prix.

However, the test went so well that Renault decided to bring forward its debut to Monaco, giving one updated power unit to each of its teams.

Red Bull decided to give the more experienced Ricciardo the updated power unit first despite Max Verstappen’s victory in Spain two weeks ago, while Renault has given its own one to Magnussen, who is ahead of Jolyon Palmer in the drivers’ championship.

Reports from testing suggested that the new power unit could be worth several tenths of a second, giving both teams a boost heading into the Monaco weekend.

Verstappen and Palmer will receive the second batch of updated power units for the Canadian Grand Prix in two weeks’ time.

Haryanto uncertain of seeing out season with Manor

MONTMELO, SPAIN - MAY 15: Rio Haryanto of Indonesia and Manor Racing before the drivers parade ahead of the Spanish Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit de Catalunya on May 15, 2016 in Montmelo, Spain.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Rio Haryanto has conceded that he is not certain of finishing the current Formula 1 season with Manor due to a shortfall in funding.

Haryanto became Indonesia’s first F1 driver when he made his debut in Australia with Manor, having been announced in its second seat over the winter.

The ex-GP2 driver enjoys significant backing from the Indonesian government, but recently launched a fan campaign to raise more funds for his racing.

Speaking in Monaco ahead of this weekend’s race, Haryanto admitted that he is not sure that he will finish the season with Manor, although he remains hopeful of sticking around.

“I hope that I can be here in my position for the full season,” Haryanto said.

“There are rumors that I can only do half of the season, but my management are working really hard to get the full season.

“My main goal is to focus on the job each race to do my best and we’ll see what happens. I’ve been hearing the rumors and, to be honest, I don’t know beyond that. I don’t know, it’s all kept on the Indonesian government side.”

Haryanto is refusing to dwell on the speculation, instead focusing on doing the best job possible for Manor.

“It’s important to leave that aside and just do my best, drive the car as quickly as possible, to work with the team,” Haryanto said.

“There’s the possibility of a lot more to come and to be able to compete with Pascal [Wehrlein], he’s a good reference. I’ll just keep it up.”

Speaking to Reuters, Haryanto’s manager confirmed that his current funding ensures he’s racing until the Hungarian Grand Prix at the end of July.

“The sponsorship is all paid for up until the 11th race,” Piers Hunnisett said.

“No problem there. That’s fully paid. It’s just the process in Indonesia with the government.

“I think in the next couple of weeks, and hopefully before Canada, we’ll get something confirmed.”

Should Haryanto lose his seat, it could pave the way for American driver Alexander Rossi to return to F1 in a full-time role.

Rossi raced in five grands prix at the end of 2015 before losing his seat and stepping down into a reserve role with Manor that he balances with a full-time drive in IndyCar.

Rosberg: Relationship with Hamilton unchanged after Spain clash

MONTE-CARLO, MONACO - MAY 25:  Nico Rosberg of Germany and Mercedes GP in the Drivers Press Conference during previews to the Monaco Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit de Monaco on May 25, 2016 in Monte-Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)
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Nico Rosberg believes that his relationship with Mercedes Formula 1 teammate Lewis Hamilton has not changed despite their clash on the first lap of the Spanish Grand Prix two weeks ago.

Rosberg and Hamilton crashed into each other just four corners into the race in Barcelona, ending Mercedes’ winning streak and leaving it without points.

Both the team and the FIA agreed that neither driver was completely to blame for the clash, but it did appear to stoke the fire between Hamilton and Rosberg once again.

Speaking ahead of this weekend’s Monaco Grand Prix, Rosberg said that the clash has done nothing to change his relationship with Hamilton and that both have moved on.

“It’s now a thing of the past. I’m not thinking about it any more,” Rosberg said.

“We’ve been through it and now looking forward and just concentrating on Monaco. I want to try and win here and that’s it.

“If we’ve spoken or not, as always, that needs to be kept internally. What I can say is that between the two of us, it’s a thing of the past now. We’re moving on with everything.

“The relationship is the same as before. Nothing’s changed.

“Going out on track, I’m not going to thinking about Barcelona. I’m going to be doing the same as always, going flat out and trying to win this grand prix.”

Rosberg has won the last three grands prix in Monaco, meaning that victory on Sunday would draw him level with Ayrton Senna for the most consecutive wins in the principality.

“I’m aware of the statistics of course, but it’s not something I’m concentrating on or even thinking about,” Rosberg said.

“What I want to do is win this race because it’s Monaco and I love winning here. That’s what I’m thinking about.”

The Monaco Grand Prix is live across NBC, NBCSN and Live Extra this weekend.

Honor, privilege to call 100th Indy 500 not lost on Goodyear, Cheever

Two-time Indy 500 runner-up Scott Goodyear has formed a F4 team with two others that will race in 2016.
Cheever and Goodyear in 2001, then teammates. Photo: Getty Images
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The rare opportunity to call the television broadcast of the 100th Indianapolis 500 is not something lost on Scott Goodyear and Eddie Cheever Jr., who share the ABC broadcast booth with Allen Bestwick for their Verizon IndyCar Series telecasts.

Though fans may not see it and may critique their style and dynamic, both Goodyear and Cheever – two past drivers – have truly committed themselves from both preparation and presentation standpoints.

Goodyear celebrates his 15th consecutive call of the ‘500 this year, having been on air every year since 2002. His last start as a driver came in 2001, when Sarah Fisher and he collided on the first lap, which left Goodyear with a back injury.

The chance to call the ‘500 in 2002 came as a surprise then – Goodyear had had his first race call six years earlier under unusual circumstances at the 1996 U.S. 500 in Michigan – and the Carmel, Ind.-based Canadian admitted he’s surprised he’s been able to carry on the call this long.

“When I started this in 2002, after I got crashed out in 2001 at Indy and broke my back for the second time, they came to me and said ‘Why don’t you become an (TV) analyst?’” Goodyear told NBC Sports.

“I let it go for a few months and then they came back to me in November and I said, ‘Okay, I’ll try it for a year.’

“The kids were growing up and I’d been away from them so much (while racing). I wanted to slow down a little bit and my wife said, ‘You might enjoy it,’ so I signed for one year. And I really didn’t think it would be going on as long as it is.”

Cheever’s entry into the broadcast booth at Indy came six years later, in 2008, 10 years after his 1998 Indy race win. His last ‘500 start came in 2006, and this is his ninth ‘500 call.

He described his preparation process for the race.

“It’s an honor and great privilege to call the 100th,” Cheever told NBC Sports. “I have looked at the first race and from there it’s about studying whatever film I can see, whatever photographs I can look at, and whatever books I can read.

“I’ve dived into the first one, the Ray Harroun race, to look at it both from a driver and from the fans’ perspective, and gone from there.”

Being part of an Indy 500 TV broadcast is a lot like being behind the wheel, Goodyear said.

“You’re not driving a race car, but in a way a lot of it is wrapped around like driving a race car,” Goodyear explained. “In a race car, it’s going, going, going and you’re multitasking. When the light goes yellow, you’re talking to your pit lane and have a conversation about what you’re going to do when it goes back to green.

“In television, when it goes on-air live, you’re going, going, going and multi-tasking because you’re watching everything that’s going on, and then when it goes yellow and you go to a commercial, you’re talking with the truck, not the pit box, and you’re coming up with what’s coming up in the future.”

Goodyear’s learned quite a lot about TV in the process.

“For me, it was an adrenaline rush in a sense, and I’ve learned a lot about television as I’ve gone through and how to get to our demographics and our fans,” he said.

“The thing is, I just didn’t think I’d be doing it as long as I am. It’s gone by quickly and on the other side, I now have more respect for the drivers and what I did because I didn’t realize it when I was doing it.

“You’re so consumed by it and you think it’s natural and that a lot of people can do it, and then the world’s going slow for you at Indy driving over 230 mph.

“I now have more respect being in the booth, watching what’s going on, how close the wheels are on oval races and how hard it is to win. So I have much more of a respect for our sport now in television than I probably had when I was driving.”

For Goodyear, who famously came up short three different ‘500s (1992, 1995 and 1997), having the opportunity to understand what race morning is like from another perspective is what makes the race for him.

“The overall event makes the race for me, in a sense. I didn’t know all the spectacle and pageantry that went on with the 500,” he admitted.

“The first year I did it, I was working it with Paul Page. He said to come early and see everything’s going on. … So I came early and I see from 6 o’clock (a.m.) onwards, everything starts to fill in, the people start to fill in, it’s like a time image. I said, ‘Hey look at this!’ and he let me go on for an hour. He said, ‘I told you’, and it was like I get it.

“Jim Nabors was there singing ‘Back Home Again In Indiana’, there was the National Anthem and the flyover – if you didn’t get goosebumps and something rushing through your body, you don’t have a pulse. To me, this was a much bigger event than I realized when I was driving it. It’s really pretty cool.”

Cheever, the 1998 winner, reflected on the fact the commentators have to understand the importance of the race because they’re a huge part in living and telling history.

“I think the Indianapolis 500 is one of the great American institutions,” he said.

“There’s not many events that have even half the longevity. We just celebrated the 50th Super Bowl. It’s something the whole world knows as very American.

“It’s a document left long after I’m gone.”