F1 Grand Prix of Hungary - Race

Schedule gaps a necessary evil in F1, IndyCar seasons


It’s a Wednesday afternoon, and we’re smack dab in the middle of two several-week long breaks in the Formula One and IndyCar calendars.

It feels like there’s been longer periods of inactivity this year because, well, there have been. F1 is in the midst of its annual August summer break, four weeks from Hungary on July 28 to Belgium on August 25. But there have been three-week gaps four times already: from Malaysia (March 24) to China (April 14), Bahrain (April 21) to Spain (May 12), Canada (June 9) to Britain (June 30) and Germany (July 7) to Hungary (July 28). But for the remaining nine Grands Prix of 2013, there are no gaps of that length, and the last six F1 races of the year are three sets of back-to-back weekends, which will push the crews to the max.

IndyCar’s schedule was first-half heavy, with 13 of the 19 races between March 24 and July 14, and only six the rest of the way through October 19. The insane stretch of weekends from before Indianapolis in May through Toronto in July featured exactly one off weekend, June 28-30, which was ludicrous. But now IndyCar is into a heavy stretch of breaks, too: three weeks from Toronto (July 14) to Mid-Ohio (August 4), another three weeks until Sonoma (August 25), and a full month between Baltimore (Sept. 1) and Houston (Oct. 5-6).

News is at a minimum particularly in the dog days of July and August which means speculation runs rampant, and the “silly season” rumor mill heats up. Honestly, it’s just a way to fill space and print, and when you prefer official announcements to guesswork (as I do), it tends to grate. It’s kind of that in-between “we’re not at the awesome, exciting starting portion” and the “thrilling, championship chase climax” points of the year. We’re just kind of along for the ride.

The difference for F1 and IndyCar, unlike the summer baseball months for instance, is that on-track activity ceases to exist save for a few tests here or there, because of cost cutbacks. There’s not a daily grind of games, but there is a thrash at race team shops, as crews work tirelessly to find that extra aerodynamic or damper improvement that could provide that necessary extra tenth or two to put them over the top. You don’t see it, unfortunately, because teams aren’t going to be giving away their secrets.

Breaks are good, but this year’s been tough in the way the schedules have shaken out to provide a consistent dose of open-wheel racing either every weekend or at least every other weekend. It’s something I hope the schedule-makers can rectify in part for 2014.

IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Ryan Hunter-Reay

Ryan Hunter-Reay
Leave a comment

MotorSportsTalk continues its look through the Verizon IndyCar Series field. Finishing sixth in 2015 after a late rally was Ryan Hunter-Reay, the 2012 series champion and 2014 Indianapolis 500 winner.

Ryan Hunter-Reay, No. 28 Andretti Autosport Honda

  • 2014: 6th Place, 3 Wins, 1 Pole, 6 Podiums, 6 Top-5, 9 Top-10, 195 Laps Led, 10.2 Avg. Start, 10.9 Avg. Finish
  • 2015: 6th Place, 2 Wins, Best Start 3rd, 3 Podiums, 4 Top-5, 7 Top-10, 71 Laps Led, 12.2 Avg. Start, 10.4 Avg. Finish

The old adage “it’s not how you start, it’s how you finish” would probably be the best way to sum up Ryan Hunter-Reay’s 2015 season, which until the final quarter of season could best be described as a forgettable nightmare.

The first three races seemed somewhat OK, with eighth, seventh and fourth place grid spots. But none of the three produced a result of note; Hunter-Reay was also caught up in the three-car, late race accident at NOLA Motorsports Park and didn’t bank any good finish until a fifth place at Barber the end of April.

A tailspin followed. Hunter-Reay started between 14th and 21st every race between the Grand Prix of Indianapolis and Milwaukee – a stretch of eight races – and only had one top-10 finish in that stint, eighth at the rain-affected lottery that was Detroit race two. Some seasons are just ones you want to end and by Milwaukee it was obvious that Hunter-Reay was racing just to get to the end of the year, without things getting any worse.

Things finally came good with a typically good drive at Iowa and arguably one of the drives of his career, two races later at Pocono, to end with two wins and extend his streak of winning a race in each of his six seasons at Andretti Autosport. It was no coincidence, either, that Hunter-Reay’s uptick in form came with the return of the late Justin Wilson’s presence in a fourth car.

After Pocono, Hunter-Reay also drove well to finish second at Sonoma, and by that point he’d completed an incredible late-season turnaround to jump from 14th to sixth in points. But if asked, he’d probably admit this was his toughest season yet at Andretti and arguably his toughest overall since his 2009 season, when he was in-between full-time rides and saw out the year with Vision Racing and A.J. Foyt Enterprises.

IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Helio Castroneves

Helio Castroneves
Leave a comment

MotorSportsTalk continues its look through the 2015 Verizon IndyCar Series field with fifth-placed Helio Castroneves.

Helio Castroneves, No. 3 Team Penske Chevrolet

  • 2014: 2nd Place, 1 Win, 3 Poles, 6 Podiums, 7 Top-5, 10 Top-10, 282 Laps Led, 5.7 Avg. Start, 9.3 Avg. Finish
  • 2015: 5th Place, Best Finish 2nd, 4 Poles, 5 Podiums, 6 Top-5, 9 Top-10, 198 Laps Led, 4.9 Avg. Start, 9.3 Avg. Finish

Much as you’d write about his fellow countryman and longtime friend and rival Tony Kanaan, age hasn’t slowed Helio Castroneves, but it’s instead fueled continued success. And while Castroneves went winless for only the second time (2011) in his illustrious 16-year career with Team Penske, he wasn’t down on performance.

Now 40, Castroneves continued to have several shining moments in 2015, which was particularly important to do to stand out against defending champion Will Power, this year’s primary title contender Juan Pablo Montoya and new driver Simon Pagenaud.

Castroneves scored four pole positions and boasted a 4.9 averaging starting position, second in the field to Power, which was very impressive to note. His run of form from Texas through Milwaukee, capturing three podiums in four races, was his best race stretch this season. Additional highlights included back-to-back runner-up results in the NOLA lottery and then on pure pace at Long Beach.

The month of May must though be viewed as a disappointment. Castroneves played a role in the first corner mess at the Grand Prix of Indianapolis and got a points penalty (although the number was dropped) as a result. Then he endured another Indianapolis 500 where he was not the out-and-out fastest car in the Penske brigade. While Montoya and Power were dueling for the win and Pagenaud had speed to burn all month, Castroneves’ lone moment of note came with his accident in practice, which mercifully he emerged unscathed from.

As ever though, fifth in this field owed to his consistency and dogged determination to succeed. Castroneves has ended top-five in seven of the last eight seasons since the IRL/Champ Car merger in 2008 and if it wasn’t for Dixon’s top-three run hogging the headlines, we’d probably appreciate Castroneves even more so. As long as he’s continually competitive, he’s still worthy at Team Penske.