Could Andretti, Montoya team up in IndyCar?

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Two former open-wheel rivals, Michael Andretti and Juan Pablo Montoya, may join forces in the IZOD IndyCar Series if sponsorship can be found for the latter.

Montoya (pictured), the 1999 CART champion and 2000 Indianapolis 500 winner, was recently told by Earnhardt Ganassi Racing that he would not be back in their No. 42 Sprint Cup drive in 2014 after a seven-year run in stock cars.

With the Colombian now on the hunt for a new gig, everything’s on the table – including a return to IndyCar. And according to The Associated Press, Andretti has reached out to him about just that.

“I have talked to Juan about IndyCar and told him ‘Hell yeah, let’s find a way to put something together,'” Andretti told the AP’s Jenna Fryer on Monday. “I’ve driven against him and I think he’s one of the best drivers I’ve ever driven against.

“It just comes down to sponsorship. So we’re looking, and if it’s a possibility, we want to do something with him.”

Andretti’s discussions with Montoya will add even more attention to the future plans of four-time IndyCar champs Andretti Autosport.

James Hinchcliffe is in the final year of his contract with the team, and it’s defintely possible that the Canadian fan favorite – who has won three times in 2013 – could head off to another squad.

Fryer reports that AA is also trying to create a deal for Carlos Munoz, who made a name for himself after finishing runner-up in this past May’s Indianapolis 500.

Needless to say, there’s a lot of work ahead for the team to get everything sorted out.

Brown: Dennis would have made same decision on McLaren-Honda split

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Zak Brown believes former McLaren team boss Ron Dennis would have made the same decision to cut ties with struggling Formula 1 engine partner Honda had he still been in charge at the team in 2017.

McLaren executive director Brown helped engineer a deal for the team to split with Honda at the end of the 2017 season after three tough seasons that had seen the Japanese manufacturer offer little in the way of performance or reliability.

The decision split opinion, with McLaren spurning a significant annual financial injection from Honda in order to link up with Renault, believing its on-track fortunes had to be prioritized over its commercial interests.

In an interview with Sky Sports, Brown was asked if he believed Dennis – McLaren’s long-running team chief before stepping down at the end of 2016 – would have made the same decision to cut ties with Honda.

“I think he would have,” Brown said.

“He was here when those conversations were ongoing and I think Ron always has and always will have the best interests of McLaren in his heart.

“He is Mr. McLaren. It burns him inside as much as us not to see us winning races.”

Brown also elaborated on the decision to break off the much-lauded relationship with Honda, saying the first signs of trouble with the 2017 power unit were clear in pre-season.

After a number of attempts to try and rectify the situation, Brown and his fellow team bosses felt there was no alternative but to end the Honda deal for 2018.

“We knew we were in trouble in testing in Barcelona and we worked really hard for six months to try and find solutions that would give us confidence that we’d be much more competitive in 2018,” Brown said.

“Ultimately, after trying many different things and many different ways we felt we couldn’t get there.

“Three years is a long time in Formula 1 and so we needed to change the direction to get our team back at the top.”