Floyd (Left) and Chip Ganassi (Photo via CGR Teams Twitter account)

Tributes pour in for Floyd Ganassi

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Floyd Ganassi, who passed away Monday at age 87, left an indelible impact on the racing community. Tributes, statements and tweets have poured in in the less than 24 hours since the news, and what’s below is merely a sampling of the outpouring of support the racing community has for Chip Ganassi’s father.

The team has announced a funeral service to be held Thursday, August 22 at 10 a.m. at the Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh.

This list is by no means exhaustive, but here are a selection of reflections on Floyd Ganassi, either statements or tweets:

TWEETS

Mike Hull, Ganassi managing director: The loss of Floyd Ganassi today is hard to accept; life’s fragile nature is measured by how much we mean to each other.

Dario Franchitti, Ganassi IndyCar driver: Today our friend Floyd Ganassi passed away, he was a massive part of the team & our good luck charm. Rest in peace Floyd, you’re a great man

Charlie Kimball, Novo Nordisk Ganassi IndyCar driver: Floyd Ganassi will be very missed in the paddock. No matter what, he always brought a smile to everyone’s faces. A great man.

Ryan Briscoe, Ganassi IndyCar driver (2005 and 2013 Indianapolis 500): I will miss Floyd Ganassi dearly. He was always so good and kind to me. My thoughts are with Chip and his family now. #ripFloyd

Juan Pablo Montoya, Ganassi Cup driver: It’s a shame we lost today a great person. Floyd Ganassi we really gonna miss u. He was a great friend.

Graham Rahal, former Ganassi IndyCar driver: RIP Floyd Ganassi. One of the greatest all around men you will ever meet. I cherished the time spent with him. He will certainly be missed.

Joey Hand, Ganassi GRAND-AM winner of 2011 Rolex 24 at Daytona: Happy to be back in the USA but very very sad to here that Floyd Ganassi has passed away. Glad to have met him. RIP Floyd.

Kyle Larson, Ganassi development driver: Sadden to hear about the passing of Chip Ganassi’s father Floyd. Thoughts and prayers go out to their family.

Tony Kanaan, IndyCar driver: RIP Floyd RT @CGRTeams Statement from Chip Ganassi Racing Teams on the Passing of Floyd Ganassi: pic.twitter.com/VG9FQ242es

Marino Franchitti, Dario’s brother, sports car driver: Rest in Peace Floyd Ganassi, going to miss his smiling face at the track & all the fantastic pics he’d take. We’ve lost a great man.

Holly Wheldon, sister of the late Dan Wheldon: Just heard the news that the very lovely Floyd Ganassi has passed away! Such a great guy at the track, will definitely be missed! #RIPFloyd

Kevin Lee, NBC Sports Network IndyCar pit reporter: Like many have stated, very saddened to hear of the passing of Floyd Ganassi. Always enjoyed visiting & will miss receiving his pics

Jenna Fryer, AP auto racing reporter: Floyd Ganassi was a special man. I’ll miss him, his photos, and the envelopes that arrived on Tuesdays. Such an honor to have known him.

Calvin Fish, former driver and current broadcaster: Tough day. Saddened by another loss in our paddock. Floyd Ganassi was a really cool guy who loved racing and Chips teams @CGRTeams #passion

Nicole Briscoe, racing broadcaster: Floyd Ganassi was always smiling & taking pictures. He’ll be greatly missed.

Pat Caporali, former Ganassi PR ace: I LOVE that Robin Miller talked about pix Floyd took every race wknd. I always looked forward to sorting through them for distribution.

Michael Andretti, IndyCar team owner, former Ganassi IndyCar driver: Really sad to hear of the loss of Floyd Ganassi today. My thoughts and prayers go out to the whole Ganassi family.

Bobby Rahal, IndyCar team owner: RIP Floyd Ganassi. A wonderful, generous man who epitomized “class”.

RLL Racing, IndyCar team: Our thoughts are with Chip, his family & all at CGR

IndyCar Ministry: Pray for Chip Ganassi Racing Teams on the Passing of Floyd Ganassi.  Pray for Chip and their family..  Godspeed Floyd.

Sebastian Saavedra, IndyCar driver: Thoughts for Chip Ganassi and the whole family on the passing of an amazing person. Floyd Ganassi.

John Barnes, Panther Racing team principal: Sad day yesterday learning of the passing of an old friend. The IndyCar paddock will never be the same. RIP Floyd Ganassi. We all loved you!

STATEMENTS

A.J. Foyt: “I’ve known Floyd for quite a few years–he was a real gentleman. I always looked forward to seeing him at the track. I know it’s going to hit Chip like it did me when my father died because Chip and Floyd were very close too. He was a great person and I thought the world of him.”

INDYCAR: INDYCAR offers its condolences to Chip Ganassi and the Ganassi family on the passing of his father, Floyd Ganassi. Floyd was a beloved member of the racing community who always was quick with a smile and handshake.  He will be missed.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway: “Everyone at IMS is saddened to learn of the loss of Floyd Ganassi. He was such a kind, approachable man who took the time to enjoy the company of drivers, officials and fans. The photographs he took at the racetrack and sent to so many friends and acquaintances will provide lasting, fond memories of his love of people and racing. Our condolences, thoughts and prayers are extended to the Ganassi family and everyone at Chip’s racing teams.”

Brian France, NASCAR Chairman/CEO: “Floyd Ganassi was a special man. He loved racing and was very important to me and my family. We wish him Godspeed and extend our sincere condolences to the entire Ganassi family. I hope they will find peace at this difficult time.”

Sean Gelael set for Toro Rosso F1 tests in 2017

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Formula 2 driver Sean Gelael will play a part in this year’s in-season Formula 1 test running after agreeing a deal with Toro Rosso.

Gelael, 20, raced full-time in GP2 last year before the championship evolved into F2, scoring one podium finish in Austria.

The Indonesian driver also appeared in the final three rounds of the FIA World Endurance Championship, scoring an LMP2 podium for Extreme Speed Motorsports in Shanghai.

Gelael will race in F2 this year with Arden, but will also get his first taste of F1 machinery in the upcoming tests for Toro Rosso.

All F1 teams will get four days of in-season running this year (two in Bahrain, two in Hungary following their respective races) as well as the traditional end-of-year test in Abu Dhabi.

Gelael will feature in all three for Toro Rosso, having undergone a seat fitting at Faenza earlier this week.

All F1 teams are required to allocate at least half of their in-season running to junior drivers who have made fewer than two grand prix starts.

Gelael will make his first appearance for Toro Rosso following the Bahrain Grand Prix, with running set to take place at the Bahrain International Circuit on April 18 and 19.

More speed, but will Formula 1 be more of the same?

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) Faster cars and fiercer competition are the great expectations of the new regulations in Formula One, yet the championship outlook hasn’t altered much ahead of the season-opening Australian Grand Prix.

Lewis Hamilton remains the hot favorite to win another title for Mercedes.

Hamilton won 10 GP events last season and was close to claiming his fourth drivers’ title but was narrowly beaten by his teammate Nico Rosberg, who secured Mercedes a third consecutive championship and then retired.

While Hamilton talked about wanting more drivers competing for the title, and even tipped Ferrari to be quickest this weekend, he’s already lining up a victory he thinks would be unprecedented.

“I don’t believe (any) team has won back-to-back through rule regulation changes,” Hamilton said Thursday during the first official news conference ahead of Sunday’s race. “So that’s our goal as a team. We’re here to win. We’re here to do what no-one else has done.

“I have every belief in my team that we can do that.”

Ferrari driver Sebastian Vettel won four consecutive season titles from 2010-13 while he was racing for Red Bull, so he knows what it’s like to be in Hamilton’s position. He has no doubt who is favorite this season, regardless of the rule changes that dictated wider tires, greater aerodynamics, bigger fuel loads and increased downforce and which are expected to make the heavier cars faster.

“Obviously Mercedes has been in a very, very strong form the last three years and even with changes to the rules and regulations, if the team is strong then they will build a strong car the year after, no matter what they do,” Vettel said. “It is very clear who is the favorite.

“For all of us sitting here we are obviously trying our best to catch up. As the season goes on obviously, I’m sure the cars will have big progression.”

Ferrari had good results in the eight days of pre-season testing, and Hamilton predicted Vettel and former champion Kimi Raikkonen would have the fastest cars in the first practice sessions Friday and Saturday.

“I see Ferrari being the quickest at the moment – and I think they’ll definitely be the favorites,” said Hamilton, who was joined at Mercedes this season by former Williams driver Valterri Bottas. “It’s interesting to see, Sebastian is usually a lot more hype. I can tell he’s trying to keep a lid on it. But their pace was obviously great in testing.”

Hamilton said he couldn’t judge the pace of the Red Bulls in testing, saying they were “quite far behind” and he didn’t see many upgrades to the cars.

“I’m assuming they’re bringing something new,” he said, “which I’m excited to see.”

Daniel Ricciardo finished as the highest-ranked of the non-Mercedes drivers last season, winning the Malaysian GP and placing third in the season standings. He concedes Hamilton will start favorite, but is hoping for a shakeup at the top.

“I think for everyone it’s like when Red Bull were dominating a few years ago – everyone wanted to see someone else win,” Ricciardo said. “It’s natural that people like change.

“For us drivers, not being in Mercedes, we want to see change as well. Even for the fact to have more cars fighting for the win makes it more exciting.”

Hamilton wanted more frequent changes to the regulations, to keep the cars getting faster and the competition “spicier.”

That’s something on which all the leading drivers could agree.

If Hamilton “wins a race against four of us as opposed to maybe just his teammate I think that reward is bigger as well,” said Ricciardo, who is aiming to be the first Australian to win the Australian GP since it became part of the world championship in 1985.

“If you can win against more … that feeling of self-accomplishment is greater. Ferrari showed good pace in testing. If they can take a few points away as well it kind of opens up the championship over the long time.”

Faster F1 cars means bigger, stronger drivers for 2017

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) Renault driver Niko Hulkenberg has the kind of name that sounds like big could be his thing.

In Formula One seasons past, muscle bulk hasn’t really been the key requirement for drivers, with work on endurance being the focus of training in the gym. The new regulations in F1 have made the cars bigger and faster, prefacing an era that has the drivers and fans more excited than usual, and so the pilots have to follow suit.

“The cars are like driving a very fast and spectacular roller-coaster and it’s a lot more demanding than before,” Hulkenberg said ahead of the season-opening Australian Grand Prix. “Now you have to wrestle these cars!

“The tires allow you to push harder every lap, so you can exploit and be on the limit. It’s a lot more work and a lot more demanding. There’s a lot that’s new, but the game is still the same.”

Lewis Hamilton has worked out the game, winning three drivers’ titles, so he’s more than ready to up the ante.

“As racing drivers in general you want to drive the quickest cars in the world and I think you always want to go faster,” the Mercedes driver said. “The cars are faster than what they were last year. The challenge of exploiting that speed with your car on the track is a great challenge and it’s more in the direction of how F1 should be in the sense of the physicality side of it.”

Hamilton, who won back-to-back titles with Mercedes in 2014 and ’15 and narrowly missed out to teammate Nico Rosberg last season, considers himself as much an athlete as a driver.

“F1 should be the most physically demanding sport in terms of all the driving series,” he said. “In previous years that hasn’t been the case – it hasn’t been to the level that we train to, is relatively easy for us to do – now you have to really push the boundaries, which I like.”

The F1 rule changes means wider tires, greater aerodynamics, bigger fuel loads and increased downforce, which have made the cars heavier but also significantly faster.

The tires, which are 25 percent wider, have more grip and are more durable, enabling drivers to push harder through the corners.

Even though Mercedes dominated under the previous regulations, Hamilton was a big advocate for the changes.

“Doing drastic changes kind of spices it up,” he said. “I have never seen the fans so excited about a season as they are this season … we don’t know where the cars and teams are, so more of these kind of experiences would be welcome.”

Toto Wolff, the head of Mercedes-Benz Motorsport, said Hamilton and his teammate Valtteri Bottas were in prime shape to make the most of the changes.

“It’s an exciting time for them because these new cars are a real physical challenge,” he said. “Both felt from testing that the G-Forces are enormous and they are embracing the new challenge.”

Four-time world champion Sebastian Vettel expects his ’17-edition Ferrari to be the fastest car he’s driven.

“For us, what really gives us a good feeling is cornering speed – I think we’re back to the level we’ve been 10 years ago, maybe a bit faster,” he said. “Nice to have the feeling that you’re in the fastest cars that you’ve ever driven.”

Vettel is among the drivers who have been working on neck and shoulder strength in particular, to handle the extra load. Daniel Ricciardo finished third in the season standings for Red Bull last year, behind the two Mercedes. He’s put in extra work to ensure he’s stronger physically, knowing that it could make a serious difference. And while he’s no hulking ball of muscle, he’s noticeably bigger than he was in 2016.

“It’s more physical this year,” he said. “We’ve all done our work in the offseason – it’s been fun to put more emphasis on the training.”

Fernando Alonso is one of the veterans of the circuit, having won back-to-back titles for Renault in 2005-06 and having stints at McLaren, Renault and Ferrari after that and before he rejoined McLaren. He’s had two tough seasons, finishing 17th and 10th, so he doesn’t mind doing the extra gym work as long as his car grows with him.

“I’m incredibly motivated and I can’t wait to see what kind of racing this new shake-up of the sport will bring,” he said. “We already know the sport is a lot more physical and the cars are more challenging to drive – from a driver’s point of view this is exactly what we were looking for in the new regulations. I really hope this will translate to good battles on track.”

FIA replaces ‘Verstappen rule’ regarding moving under braking for 2017

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Formula 1 race director Charlie Whiting has confirmed that the ‘Verstappen rule’ regarding moving under braking has been relaxed and simplified ahead of the 2017 season.

Following complaints from a number of drivers regarding Red Bull driver Max Verstappen’s aggressive defensive moves through 2016, the FIA clamped down on moving under braking ahead of the United States Grand Prix last October.

Sebastian Vettel was the first driver to fall foul of the new rule, losing his podium finish in Mexico after moving under braking when defending his position from Daniel Ricciardo late in the race.

In order to streamline the race stewards’ efforts to officiate the race, Whiting confirmed ahead of this weekend’s Australian Grand Prix that the rule had been simplified and turned into a ‘catch-all’ regulation.

“I think there will be a small change in some of the incidents that we’ve seen last year they’ll be handled quite differently simply, because the so-called ‘Verstappen rule’ is gone to the effect that before we said any move under braking will be investigated,” Whiting told reporters, as quoted by crash.net.

“Now, we have a simple rule that says effectively that if a driver moves erratically or goes unnecessarily slow or behaves in a manner that could endanger another driver, then he will be investigated.

“So there’s a very broad rule now but we’ve done after Austin last year in response to some comments from drivers, we used the existing rules to put notes on how we’re going to interpret the existing rules.

“The interpretation simply was that drivers shouldn’t move under braking. That’s what gave rights to the incident in Mexico, that’s what gave rights to the penalty in Mexico.”

Whiting said that the move came after teams requested the stewards trigger less snap investigations during races and focus on possibly dangerous incidents.

“What we were requested to do, which we think is a more general way of approaching things, is to give the stewards one rule to work with,” Whiting explained.

“It’s an all-encompassing rule.You can do more or less anything with that. That was the request from the teams, they wanted less investigations and only in cases where it was clearly dangerous would they take action.

“We had a meeting yesterday with all the stewards and we reviewed all the controversial incidents from last year to see how they would be dealt with this year under the so-called new rules or the new approach. It was quite interesting. I won’t go into it now, but it was quite interesting.”

The revised rule will get its first try-out in this weekend’s Australian Grand Prix, live on NBCSN from 12am ET on Sunday.