Alex Tagliani (No. 61) and a Sahlen's DP car. (AIM Autosport photo)

Passion for Ferrari fuels Tagliani’s first start for R.Ferri/AIM at Kansas

Leave a comment

Alex Tagliani’s been through several peaks and valleys in a dozen-plus year IndyCar career, and maintained resilience and composure through it all. He’s been on pole for the Indianapolis 500, and also been unceremoniously dumped more than once.

And yet, the nerves struck the popular Canadian in an entirely new way when he strapped into the No. 61 R.Ferri/AIM Motorsport Racing with Ferrari F458 Italia GT car at, of all places, the Kansas Speedway “roval” for last week’s GRAND-AM Rolex Series race.

“Honestly, I’ve never felt the way I did like I did last weekend,” Tagliani told MotorSportsTalk in a Monday interview. “I was more nervous than at the start of the Indianapolis 500! It was a bit stressful at first.

“There was more to it than just, you drive, get in the car, do your best and see you later. It was, I’m driving a Ferrari red car, wearing a Ferrari red suit, having had passion for the brand since I was a kid and growing up with Gilles Villeneuve in a Ferrari as my idol. When you put the suit on you know what you have to represent, because they have a job and certain standards to respect because they are representing Ferrari.”

Tagliani was a last-minute substitute for Max Papis in Kansas as co-driver to Jeff Segal, defending Rolex GT class co-champion, as Papis had NASCAR obligations in Mid-Ohio. The No. 61 is a new car this year, joining the sister No. 69 AIM/FXDD Ferrari in the AIM Autosport stable, and won its first race with Papis and Segal at Indianapolis in July.

Tagliani couldn’t fill in for Papis a week earlier at Road America with his own NASCAR Canada commitments in Trois-Rivieres, and fellow Canadian Kenny Wilden did so admirably.

Team principal Remo Ferri, a several-decade motorsports veteran, Ferrari dealership owner and Italian who now lives in Canada, described the process of providing Tagliani this opportunity.

“Through our racing department, when we found out he was no longer driving in IndyCar, we reached out and contacted him,” Ferri said. “It was fantastic to see a Canadian of Italian descendents driving the car. I’m Italian, I live in Canada, and it was great to put a great Canadian driver in our car.”

source:
Alex Tagliani (AIM Autosport photo)

Tagliani’s enthusiasm bled through the phone when I asked him the same question.

“Never in a million years would have I turned the offer down, because it was too good to be true,” he said. “When I started racing in IndyCar, well I thought it was almost impossible at my age. I was dedicated to North American racing, and IndyCar was my series. So the chance of driving a Ferrari car, in a professional series, was long gone in my mind. I was not thinking about it. But then this did happen, and it was the best thing that could have happened.”

Almost immediately, Tagliani gelled with the team, which also includes two of his other late-1990s Atlantic rivals besides Wilden, Andrew Bordin (AIM Autosport team co-owner) and Anthony Lazzaro, who co-drives with Emil Assentato in the No. 69 AIM/FXDD Ferrari.

Tagliani and Segal began working through data, with Tagliani able to feed off Segal’s expertise of the GRAND-AM spec Ferrari F458, yet still able to provide his own insights that he thought could make a difference.

“I didn’t feel like I was subbing; I didn’t feel like it was a one-race event. I want to do more,” Tagliani said. “I got involved with the team right away in looking at setups, trying to see if we could develop the car in a different way.”

Ferri spoke highly of Tagliani’s feedback but acknowledged that it was difficult to learn too much from just one race.

“I can tell you he did a good job, and I praised him at the end of the race,” Ferri said. “I know he is a good driver, but let’s find out a little more.”

Things couldn’t have gotten off to a better start as Tagliani scored the pole position on Friday. But unfortunate issues on a pit stop late in the race truncated what had been a promising debut, where the No. 61 led laps throughout the night.

The biggest takeaway I took from my near 30-minute conversation with “Tag” – you hate to cut so much of the chat out – was his passion exuded for Ferrari. In an era where commercialism and corporate interests rule heavily, the simple concept of a driver falling in love with a car, its history and what it represents speaks volumes compared to a driver merely thanking his or her sponsors and getting on with it.

Tagliani explained the rationale behind that logic: “Anything I’ve raced before has layers: it has a race suit and the sponsor. You’re driving a Ford Cosworth-powered car with Player’s on the chassis. You’re driving a Honda with Barracuda Racing as the sponsor. But when you drive a Ferrari, with a Ferrari suit, you’re driving a Ferrari first.”

Understandably, Tagliani is looking toward the future and he may be examining making a home in sports car racing full-time with Ferrari in 2014. Without reading too much into things, both Tagliani and Ferri seem optimistic that Kansas wasn’t just a one-off.

“I was very happy,” Tagliani said. “I think I fit well with the brand and the team. I’m very thankful and appreciative that I had this opportunity once in my life and that it could open more doors than I could have imagined.”

Ferri likened it to the beginning of a relationship.

“I like the guy very much; we’re just beginning to date each other, like a couple,” he said. “And if we go out again, and again, and again, eventually, we might get married.”

Here’s what drivers said after Sunday’s INDYCAR race was postponed until Monday

IndyCar
Leave a comment

Here’s what several drenched drivers had to say after Sunday’s Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama was postponed until Monday morning (11:30 a.m. ET, LIVE on NBCSN):

JOSEF NEWGARDEN (No. 1 Hitachi Team Penske Chevrolet, 2017 Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama winner, 2018 pole winner): “It’s tough because we have so many people that come out here to watch us. We want to put on a good race. We want to put on a show. So calling the race, running around behind the pace car not running, it’s tough, it’s tough to do that. But I think it was the right thing in the end. When we started the race, the conditions were OK. You could run at that level of rain. Then, it intensified right before that first caution. I think when the caution came out, it got to a point where it was just too much. There was too much puddling and pooling of water on every straightaway. Then the rivers started flowing, high-speed compressions in Turns 1 and 2, fast corner, 12 and 13, fast corner where the river starts to form. Just tough. I mean, look, we love racing in the rain. It’s got nothing to do with not wanting to run in the rain, not being able to do that. It’s that this type of track with this water level was too much to race today. We’ve run here in the rain before, but it intensified to the point where you’re starting to get in a situation where it’s going to take it out of the drivers’ hands. What happened with Will (Power), I don’t think is a driver error. I don’t know how anyone is going to drive hydroplaning on the front straightaway. I think you would have had that for the rest of the track, too. A tough situation. Thanks for the fans that came out and supported us. Hopefully we’ll get some people back tomorrow and we’ll get the show in and put on a great event.”

MATHEUS “MATT” LEIST (No. 4 ABC Supply AJ Foyt Racing Chevrolet):
“Tough day so far. We had some problems with our radio and fuel alarm, but otherwise the car was alright. It was just too dangerous out there, we couldn’t see anything, so I think they made the right call. Hopefully we’ll have a good race tomorrow.”

WILL POWER (No. 12 Verizon Team Penske Chevrolet): “It’s just a real shame for everyone on the Verizon Chevy team. The car was good and we were doing our best out there, but it was really hard to see anything in front of me. The conditions were just so bad. As soon as I got to the frontstraight, the car just came around, and I tried to keep it off the wall, but it was hydroplaning and there was nothing I could do. I feel bad for the team and for the fans in this weather. Just too bad. Hopefully our luck can turn around when we get to Indianapolis.”

TONY KANAAN (No. 14 ABC Supply AJ Foyt Racing Chevrolet): “Very difficult day for us. In the race we were 13th at the time and we had some electrical issues, so that caused us to pit and we lost a lap. Not the ideal situation, but we don’t give up. There’s still a race tomorrow and we’re going to go for the most points. Anything can happen.”

GRAHAM RAHAL (No. 15 Mi-Jack Honda): “It was a tough beginning, but when we kind of got going it was OK and kind of fun to challenge for a while, but visibility was a major issue today, no doubt. I’m glad that the series postponed it. I would have like to get it in today, but that’s life. We will go racing tomorrow.”

ALEXANDER ROSSI (No. 27 Kerauno / MilitaryToMotorsports.com Honda, Verizon IndyCar Series points leader): “I think definitely the right decision was made to red flag the race. It’s a very difficult position for everyone to be in. It’s never the result that you want, but safety is obviously a priority. I think everyone did a good job considering the conditions of looking out for each other. Not being able to see is not doing anybody any good. It is hard for everyone, but glad that we’re all in one piece and try again later.

TAKUMA SATO (No. 30 Mi-Jack / Panasonic Honda): “As you could see on TV, if you couldn’t see the car, it was probably three times worse in the cockpit on the main straight or any straight. You had to completely trust the guys that they were accelerating. Never the less, I made good progress on the short stint and I made up a few positions.  The car was working well, but also was aquaplaning a lot, too, so I have to respect INDYCAR’s decision for everyone’s safety. Now we really need to concentrate on having a good car for tomorrow. I’m sorry for the fans that sat in rain all day, but thank them for their support.”

RENE BINDER (No. 32 Binderholz tiptop timber Chevrolet): “It was a short day. In the beginning the conditions were not that good, but afterwards the conditions started to improve. The race was stopped, then restarted, and I think the conditions were not too bad at that point. Unfortunately, it was red flagged again and then cancelled for the day. It would have been nice to get halfway, but we will come back and try again tomorrow.”