Vettel tops FP2 in Spa despite puncture

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Sebastian Vettel has sent out a warning shot to his title rivals by finishing quickest in Free Practice 2 for the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa-Francorchamps on Friday, edging out teammate Mark Webber by just 0.059 seconds to head up a Red Bull one-two.

However, the world champion did not have it all his own way, suffering from a puncture that ended his session early. He had already done enough to secure top spot as the field focused on fuelled runs, with Romain Grosjean, Felipe Massa and Jean-Eric Vergne particularly impressing to tail home the Red Bulls in third, fourth and fifth respectively.

Conditions had improved drastically since the end of free practice one this morning where rain showers had limited meaningful running, with Spa-Francorchamps bathing in bright sunshine under blue skies. The serenity was quickly broken as Jenson Button and Nico Hulkenberg were the first drivers out on track, with the latter’s teammate, Esteban Gutierrez, setting the first benchmark time of 1:52.954 only for Daniel Ricciardo to go a fraction quicker seconds later. Paul di Resta and Pastor Maldonado also occupied P1 momentarily as the teams looked to make up for the lost time in the morning session, resulting in a frantic few minutes on track. Once the order had settled down, it was Sebastian Vettel who led from Ferrari’s Felipe Massa and Fernando Alonso.

With the hard tires thoroughly tested, the first runners began to switch to the white-ringed medium compound, led by Ricciardo in the Toro Rosso. The Australian could only move up to P7 initially, not bothering the leaders who remained in the pits after their initial runs. When they did emerge, Webber set the immediate pace, dethroning his teammate by over one second, only for Vettel to strike back and reclaim P1 minutes later. Romain Grosjean and Kimi Raikkonen also set an impressive pace on fresh tires, with both drivers thought to be using the passive DRS device at Spa this weekend. Maldonado also showed signs of good pace throughout the session, suggesting that Williams may have turned a corner in their season.

As the race simulation runs began, the times at the top of the leaderboard came under little threat. Vettel’s engineer reassured the German driver that he was doing a good job as he looks to extend his championship lead this weekend. He will be hoping that he has used up all of his bad luck after a slow puncture forced him to crawl back to the pits with twenty minutes to go. Moments later, Giedo van der Garde speared his Caterham into the wall on the exit of Stavelot, ending his practice session early.

Once the stricken Caterham had been recovered, the yellow flags were withdrawn and the drivers returned to their original programme. However, with heavy fuel on board, none of the drivers could threaten Red Bull’s dominance at the top of the timesheets, suggesting that we could be set for a repeat of the 2011 Belgian GP where Vettel led Webber home in a one-two for the team, barring any punctures of course.

Here’s what drivers said after Sunday’s INDYCAR race was postponed until Monday

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Here’s what several drenched drivers had to say after Sunday’s Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama was postponed until Monday morning (11:30 a.m. ET, LIVE on NBCSN):

JOSEF NEWGARDEN (No. 1 Hitachi Team Penske Chevrolet, 2017 Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama winner, 2018 pole winner): “It’s tough because we have so many people that come out here to watch us. We want to put on a good race. We want to put on a show. So calling the race, running around behind the pace car not running, it’s tough, it’s tough to do that. But I think it was the right thing in the end. When we started the race, the conditions were OK. You could run at that level of rain. Then, it intensified right before that first caution. I think when the caution came out, it got to a point where it was just too much. There was too much puddling and pooling of water on every straightaway. Then the rivers started flowing, high-speed compressions in Turns 1 and 2, fast corner, 12 and 13, fast corner where the river starts to form. Just tough. I mean, look, we love racing in the rain. It’s got nothing to do with not wanting to run in the rain, not being able to do that. It’s that this type of track with this water level was too much to race today. We’ve run here in the rain before, but it intensified to the point where you’re starting to get in a situation where it’s going to take it out of the drivers’ hands. What happened with Will (Power), I don’t think is a driver error. I don’t know how anyone is going to drive hydroplaning on the front straightaway. I think you would have had that for the rest of the track, too. A tough situation. Thanks for the fans that came out and supported us. Hopefully we’ll get some people back tomorrow and we’ll get the show in and put on a great event.”

MATHEUS “MATT” LEIST (No. 4 ABC Supply AJ Foyt Racing Chevrolet):
“Tough day so far. We had some problems with our radio and fuel alarm, but otherwise the car was alright. It was just too dangerous out there, we couldn’t see anything, so I think they made the right call. Hopefully we’ll have a good race tomorrow.”

WILL POWER (No. 12 Verizon Team Penske Chevrolet): “It’s just a real shame for everyone on the Verizon Chevy team. The car was good and we were doing our best out there, but it was really hard to see anything in front of me. The conditions were just so bad. As soon as I got to the frontstraight, the car just came around, and I tried to keep it off the wall, but it was hydroplaning and there was nothing I could do. I feel bad for the team and for the fans in this weather. Just too bad. Hopefully our luck can turn around when we get to Indianapolis.”

TONY KANAAN (No. 14 ABC Supply AJ Foyt Racing Chevrolet): “Very difficult day for us. In the race we were 13th at the time and we had some electrical issues, so that caused us to pit and we lost a lap. Not the ideal situation, but we don’t give up. There’s still a race tomorrow and we’re going to go for the most points. Anything can happen.”

GRAHAM RAHAL (No. 15 Mi-Jack Honda): “It was a tough beginning, but when we kind of got going it was OK and kind of fun to challenge for a while, but visibility was a major issue today, no doubt. I’m glad that the series postponed it. I would have like to get it in today, but that’s life. We will go racing tomorrow.”

ALEXANDER ROSSI (No. 27 Kerauno / MilitaryToMotorsports.com Honda, Verizon IndyCar Series points leader): “I think definitely the right decision was made to red flag the race. It’s a very difficult position for everyone to be in. It’s never the result that you want, but safety is obviously a priority. I think everyone did a good job considering the conditions of looking out for each other. Not being able to see is not doing anybody any good. It is hard for everyone, but glad that we’re all in one piece and try again later.

TAKUMA SATO (No. 30 Mi-Jack / Panasonic Honda): “As you could see on TV, if you couldn’t see the car, it was probably three times worse in the cockpit on the main straight or any straight. You had to completely trust the guys that they were accelerating. Never the less, I made good progress on the short stint and I made up a few positions.  The car was working well, but also was aquaplaning a lot, too, so I have to respect INDYCAR’s decision for everyone’s safety. Now we really need to concentrate on having a good car for tomorrow. I’m sorry for the fans that sat in rain all day, but thank them for their support.”

RENE BINDER (No. 32 Binderholz tiptop timber Chevrolet): “It was a short day. In the beginning the conditions were not that good, but afterwards the conditions started to improve. The race was stopped, then restarted, and I think the conditions were not too bad at that point. Unfortunately, it was red flagged again and then cancelled for the day. It would have been nice to get halfway, but we will come back and try again tomorrow.”