Besides Dixon’s, cautions, penalties pepper Sonoma race

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As the GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma unfolded Sunday, I felt for head of IndyCar PR Amy Konrath, who was seemingly announcing penalties in the media center as frequently as a lottery host reveals the night’s winning POWER Ball numbers.

Five drivers were issued drive-through penalties for avoidable contact – E.J. Viso, Sebastien Bourdais, Tony Kanaan, Sebastian Saavedra and Ryan Briscoe – and Viso and of course, Scott Dixon, were issued drive-throughs for pit safety infractions.

Coupled with seven caution flags, which ties the season high in IndyCar (seven at Brazil), it made for a busy day in Race Control. The race itself lasted more than 2 hours and 20 minutes, a full 40-plus minutes longer than the most recent race at Mid-Ohio three weeks ago, which ran its 90 caution-free laps in just an hour and 40 minutes.

Reactions were strong and largely against IndyCar race director Beaux Barfield’s call to penalize Dixon when he hit the right rear tire, and subsequently Will Power’s pit crewmembers on his last scheduled stop.

I’m not going to take sides here, but I will offer this bit of insight having sat in on a Barfield-directed race control environment before (the American Le Mans Series race in September 2011, at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca). It is far easier to make a rash judgment on social media than it is to make a call based on available video evidence, from multiple angles, in a split-second decision. And Barfield is not alone within IndyCar Race Control; the room has several stewards and IndyCar President of Competition and Operations, Derrick Walker, is also there.

Where the violation occurred in this instance was in accordance with Rule 7.10.1.6 (Contact with personnel; under the pit procedures heading) and from that standpoint, Dixon did violate the rule as it is written in the 2013 IZOD IndyCar Series Rulebook.

Dixon and Target Chip Ganassi Racing managing director Mike Hull were understandably frustrated in the aftermath, but the two are classy enough individuals to where you wouldn’t think either one would accuse another crew of intentionally getting in the way to try to force a penalty.

It seems a daft idea that a crewmember would willingly throw him or herself in the way and risk their own injury. You need to have acute situational awareness when you are over the pit wall in pit lane. If such a situation could be proven, then a penalty should follow, in this writer’s opinion.

MRTI: Telitz gets creative to help racing career

Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
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To say that Belardi Auto Racing’s Aaron Telitz has endured a difficult start to the 2018 Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires season would be an understatement. The Wisconsin native only completed four corners through the first three races – Races 1 and 2 at St. Petersburg, and Race 1 at Barber Motorsports Park – with St. Pete being especially problematic.

He took the pole for Race 1, but a crash during qualifying for Race 2 prevented him from actually starting. What’s more, the damage was so severe that the Belardi team needed a brand new chassis, with Telitz’s Dallara IL-15 damaged beyond repair.

They also had to borrow a car from Carlin for Race 2, but Telitz’s race ended after he got tangled up with Victor Franzoni in Turn 2 on Lap 1.

With the damage bill well into the six figures as a result, Telitz has taken to some unique, or rather, creative ways to raise money in the aftermath to help cover the costs. “Creative,” in this case, meaning Telitz is using his art skills.

An artist in his spare time, Telitz has begun selling his own original paintings to help raise money.

 “I’ve been to a lot of art shows and I see stuff and I go, ‘Holy cow, someone’s going to pay a thousand dollars for that thing?’” Telitz quipped in a story posted on the Milwaukee Journal.

In discussing his artistic abilities, Telitz added, “I’m working at getting better. I’d like to be able to paint some animals, those types of things. I got a request from Alexander Rossi to see if I could paint his dog. Unfortunately I can’t do that yet.”

Further, in a partnership with The Styled Garage, Telitz is selling his own merchandise, and accepting donations, to help his cause.

Telitz finished fourth in Race 2 at Barber on Sunday, and sits seventh in the Indy Lights championship, 59 points behind leader Pato O’Ward.

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