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NASCAR looking into Bowyer’s Chase-altering spin at Richmond (UPDATED)


UPDATE (1:40 p.m. ET): The Associated Press is reporting that NASCAR is now reviewing evidence to determine whether Michael Waltrip Racing did indeed try to orchestrate the outcome of last night’s Chase-deciding race at Richmond International Raceway.

NASCAR President Mike Helton has told the AP that Race Control did not believe Clint Bowyer’s spin with seven laps to go was suspicious, but also said that the sanctioning body would look for evidence of wrongdoing.

NASCAR has also released an official statement: “NASCAR is reviewing Saturday night’s race at Richmond International Raceway per protocol and has no plans for further statement until that process is complete.”

A day later, the debate is still raging among NASCAR fans over whether or not Bowyer intentionally spun out to help Michael Waltrip Racing teammate Martin Truex, Jr. make the post-season.

By now, we’ve all seen the in-car video of Bowyer going around coming off of Turn 4 with seven laps to go. The incident effectively ended what would have been a season-saving run to the front from Ryan Newman, and led to a poor pit stop for him under the final yellow.

He went in first, came out fifth, and could only move up to third by the checkered flag. Truex, who finished seventh, wound up earning the final Wild Card spot on a tie-breaker over Newman.

Bowyer’s spin also impacted Jeff Gordon’s bid to make the post-season after he had rallied from two laps down earlier in the night. The final restart after the spin was a bad one for Gordon, and Joey Logano managed to beat him to the 10th and final spot in the Chase by a single point.

For his part, Bowyer blamed an ill-handling No. 15 Toyota as the cause of his spin. But everything about what’s seen and heard in the in-car video – “Is your arm starting to hurt? I bet it’s hot – itch it” – is probably not doing him or MWR any favors right now.

And as USA Today’s Nate Ryan relays in his analysis of the situation, there are other pieces of evidence that appear to be damaging – Bowyer managing to lose positions in the pits after his relatively harmless spin and another MWR driver, Brian Vickers, running well off the pace on the final lap of the event.

In the NASCAR world, controversy can – and most of the time, is – seen to be a good thing. But this time, it’s not.

Newman’s final stop may have, ultimately, been the direct cause of him missing out on the Chase (it led him to throw his pit crew under the bus afterwards on national television), but if not for Bowyer’s spin, it was likely that Newman would’ve won the race and clinched a Wild Card berth.

And maybe, if the race had stayed green, Gordon would’ve been able to peel off the two extra positions he needed in order to knock Logano out and race his way into the post-season, just like he did at RIR one year ago.

Two brilliant charges from both Newman and Gordon, dashed in what appears – at least, on the surface – to be a highly suspect bit of gamesmanship.

But as Ryan points out, what exactly can NASCAR do about it? Saturday’s results can’t be undone – and as long as there are multi-car squads running around, the prospect of such shenanigans will always be there, too.

It all leads toward what may be seen as a chilling question by some of the stock car faithful: Has the moment finally arrived for NASCAR where the issue of “team orders” becomes a regular, race-to-race controversy?

Formula E: Team Aguri confirms da Costa for second season

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Antonio Felix da Costa has been confirmed for a second season with Team Aguri for the 2015-2016 FIA Formula E Championship, which begins later this month in Beijing.

He won once this past year at Buenos Aires and finished eighth in the points despite missing both the season opener and season finale due to clashes with his DTM schedule.

Said the 24-year-old Portuguese driver, “I am really happy to continue with Team Aguri and Formula E for season two. This championship is earning its respect in the world of motorsport and I am honoured to be involved. Regarding the season, I am really looking forward to getting started.”

Team Aguri team principal Mark Preston added, “It is a great pleasure to have Antonio continuing with the team for season two of Formula E. Antonio brought us our maiden win in Buenos Aires and helped to develop the team from scratch, he will continue to build on that success for season two and beyond.”

The team that bares the name of ex-Formula 1 driver and team owner Aguri Suzuki has not yet confirmed its second driver, which is the last outstanding seat to be filled on the Formula E grid.

Amlin, which had partnered with Aguri last year, is now present with the Andretti Formula E team and its drivers, Robin Frijns and Simona de Silvestro.

Hulkenberg leads shorter than normal FP1 in Russia

Nico Hulkenberg
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Force India’s Nico Hulkenberg posted a 1:44.355 lap of the of the Sochi Autodrom to lead a fairly abnormal, and shorter than usual, first free practice for the Russian Grand Prix.

Hulkenberg posted the time to conclude the usual 90-minute session, to pip Nico Rosberg at 1:44.407 on his final lap. The usual 90-minute session was shortened due to a track delay for cleanup of diesel fuel on course.

Sebastian Vettel, Sergio Perez and Daniel Ricciardo completed the top five.

While the clock started on time for the full 90-minute session, track activity was halted for the opening 30 minutes to clean up diesel spillage on the track at Turn 8.

It left teams and drivers with just a 60-minute first free practice to tackle the Sochi Autodrom, but did not push the session later or affect the timetable for the rest of the day. However, with a damp if not entirely wet track, it made things difficult in FP1.

The delay also meant that teams weren’t able to use an extra set of Pirellis handed out at the start of FP1. Supersofts can be used for the first time in FP2.

During the delay, it did offer a chance for sarcasm, and Manor seized the opportunity following a comment from McLaren Honda’s Fernando Alonso noting that even with Mercedes engines next year, Manor wouldn’t move ahead of them.

NBC’s Will Buxton explained the track surface dilemma drivers would face in this session.

With just under one hour to go in the session, Sauber’s Marcus Ericsson was the first to head out on course, leading several others. Ericsson made the first laps of the weekend at the track where he made his final start for Caterham a year ago.

Both Williams drivers went on course on Pirelli’s wet weather tires for their installation laps. Mercedes’ Nico Rosberg tried the intermediates, and Alonso was first on course in slicks.

No official times were registered until there were less than 40 minutes remaining in the session, with Alonso registering a 2:00.736 time, while putting down a bevy of sparks. He quickly lowered the mark to 1:56.327, and 1:53.854 after that. Ericsson was next in at a 1:58.926, although dropped into the 1:54 range not long after.

Alonso’s teammate Jenson Button clocked in at 1:50.920 with just under 20 minutes remaining and for the first time this year, we could say we had a McLaren Honda 1-2 on track, albeit under abnormal circumstances.

The trsck got busy in the final 15 minutes, with Toro Rosso’s Max Verstappen posting a 1:50.870 to lead before Alonso clocked in a 1:49.240.

A 1:47.959 from Williams’ Valtteri Bottas, then a 1:45.987 from Hulkenberg followed in the final 10 minutes as times firmly began to drop. Vettel got down to a 1:45.491 shortly thereafter, and Mercedes’ Lewis Hamilton came up two tenths shy of the mark at a 1:45.691.

Ericsson reported a power cut near the end of the session down at Sauber but otherwise there were no issues through the field, other than a handful of spins, including one from Hamilton on his final flier at the second-to-last corner.

FP2 begins from 7 a.m. ET on NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra.