Bowyer’s spin recalls other controversial “team orders” moments (VIDEO)

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As NASCAR continues to investigate Michael Waltrip Racing’s actions in the closing laps of the regular season Sprint Cup Series finale at Richmond Saturday night, now’s an appropriate time to recall other team order controversies that have popped up over the recent years. Three of the most egregious – and memorable – have occurred in Formula One.

2002: AUSTRIAN GRAND PRIX, BARRICHELLO YIELDS TO SCHUMACHER

Hindsight being 20/20, this didn’t need to happen. Michael Schumacher and the Ferrari F2002 were all-conquering, and the German had his fifth (of seven) titles and third in a row wrapped by July of 2002.

So when Rubens Barrichello, who had dominated the early-season Austrian Grand Prix from pole position, was asked by the team to yield to allow Schumacher through, it raised a firestorm.

Barrichello said in later interviews that he was “threatened to be fired” if he didn’t pull over.

2002: U.S. GRAND PRIX, STAGED FINISH GOES AWRY

This is the one that wasn’t supposed to happen later in the year between the same two Ferrari teammates. In an attempt to set up a perfectly staged formation finish at Indianapolis, Barrichello actually got ahead of Schumacher by 0.011 of a second. Whoops.

Fortunately for F1, it wasn’t the worst day it had at Indianapolis – that came in 2005 with the Michelin tire fiasco.

2008: SINGAPORE GRAND PRIX, “CRASHGATE”

Probably Singapore’s most memorable contribution to Formula One in five prior Grands Prix, and certainly Nelson Piquet Jr.’s most memorable moment in his forgettable season-and-a-half with Renault.

The Brazilian crashed to bring out a safety car period on Lap 14. Renault teammate Fernando Alonso had already pitted and thus vaulted to a lead he would not relinquish.

Piquet, meanwhile, was later found by the FIA World Motor Sport Council to have crashed intentionally under the orders of Renault team boss Flavio Briatore and chief engineer Pat Symonds. Briatore and Symonds faced bans from F1, but after they sued, both had their bans overturned.

Piquet lost his Renault seat midway through 2009 and has since moved to America to pursue a career in the NASCAR ranks.

Others you can recall? Let us know in the comments.

Red Bull Air Race: Yoshi Muroya joins Sato as Japanese champs at Indy

Photo: Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Content Pool
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Takuma Sato isn’t the only major Japanese athlete to take home top honors at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway this year. Countryman Yoshihide Muroya joined him in that on Sunday after winning Red Bull Air Race at IMS, and the Red Bull Air Race World Championship in the process.

Fittingly, the 101st Indianapolis 500 champion was there on site to join him in the celebration.

Muroya flew with a track-record run in the final and erased the four-point deficit to points leader Martin Sonka. The record run came after a disappointing qualifying effort of 11th in the 14-pilot field in the Master Class.

A day after the win, Muroya joined Sato in heading to Sato’s new Verizon IndyCar Series team, Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing’s, Indianapolis-based shop.

A few social posts from Muroya’s victory and the subsequent celebration are below.

CHECKING OUT EACH OTHER’S RIDES

ASTLES BREAKS THOUGH AS WELL

Muroya wasn’t alone among big winners at the Speedway. In the Challenger Class, Melanie Astles of France became the first woman to win a major race at IMS, and is the first female winner in the Red Bull Air Race World Championship.

Nine women have competed in the Indianapolis 500 (Janet Guthrie, Lyn St. James, Sarah Fisher, Danica Patrick, Milka Duno, Simona de Silvestro, Pippa Mann, Ana Beatriz, Katherine Legge) and Mann is the first woman to have been on the pole position at IMS, having done so for the Freedom 100 in 2010 in Indy Lights.

Photo: Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Content Pool