Geico 400 - Practice

Truex not happy about decision to put Gordon in Chase


With Jeff Gordon as the 13th driver for this year’s Chase for the Sprint Cup, Martin Truex Jr. is now officially the guy that’s gotten the worst deal out of the controversy stemming from last Saturday’s race at Richmond International Raceway.

Truex was knocked out of the Chase after NASCAR penalized Michael Waltrip Racing substantially on Monday, allowing Ryan Newman to ascend to the second Wild Card transfer spot. On Friday, NASCAR put Gordon into the Chase, which caused Truex to air his frustration over still being left out of the post-season run.

“I’m not even sure what to say at this point. I’m kind of at a loss for words,” Truex said on Friday according to Jenna Fryer of The Associated Press. “How they make a spot for somebody – they kick me out to make a spot for somebody and then they don’t do the same for the other guys?

“It’s just unfair and nothing I can do about it.”

Last Saturday at Richmond, MWR’s Clint Bowyer spun out with seven laps to go to start the whole thing. At that time, the spin wound up enabling Truex to earn a Chase spot, while Newman and Gordon were left out.

But while NASCAR maintains it was unable to prove that Bowyer’s spin was deliberate, the sanctioning body would nail MWR on radio communications between Brian Vickers and team general manager Ty Norris that had the former being told to pit with three laps left.

Two nights later, NASCAR delivered its punishment: 50-point penalties for Truex, Bowyer and Vickers; probation for their respective crew chiefs; a $300,000 fine; and an indefinite suspension for Norris.

The penalties were especially hard to swallow for Truex after he had driven valiantly over the last two races with a cast on his broken right wrist, sustained in a crash last month at Bristol Motor Speedway.

“We ran third at Atlanta. We had a 20th-place car at Richmond, we battled our tails off to finish seventh with it and really, that’s as far as it goes for me,” Truex said.

“When the race was over, I wasn’t aware of what happened, what the cautions were for. I didn’t know the 55 [Vickers] pitted at the end…It’s a difficult situation, like I said, for all of us. Just ready to move on.”

Truex may be ready to move on, but it doesn’t change the fact that it seems wrong for him to be on the sidelines of this year’s championship battle after he had raced so hard to clinch a post-season berth.

Gordon, the second addition to the Chase in the last five days, showed some sympathy for Truex’s plight on Friday.

“He drove his butt off [at Richmond],” said Gordon. “I raced with him in the closing laps and he raced hard. You could tell what he was racing for. The guy didn’t do anything wrong. For that, I felt bad for him. But we didn’t get to see the race play out.

“We don’t know what the results were going to be because of the circumstances of that spin changed everything. That, to me, is the only reason I’m accepting being in in the 13th, because under normal circumstances I would say, ‘No, that’s not right.'”

IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Sage Karam

Sage Karam
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MotorSportsTalk continues its run through the 2015 Verizon IndyCar Series field, driver-by-driver. Ending in 20th was Sage Karam, who generated a lot of headlines despite missing a handful of races in his first full season in the big leagues.

Sage Karam, No. 8 Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet

  • 2014: 9th place at Indianapolis 500; several starts in the TUDOR United SportsCar Championship
  • 2015: 20th place (12 starts), Best Finish 3rd, Best Start 3rd, 1 Podium, 2 Top-5, 2 Top-10, 12 Laps Led, 14.5 Avg. Start, 15.8 Avg. Finish

Few drivers generated as much ink as Karam did during what as an ultimately race-by-race rookie season that saw him active in 12 of 16 races. It was an overall rocky campaign that featured any combination of brilliance, controversy and heartache depending on the weekend.

Karam was on the back foot to begin with anyway with limited preseason testing, following a wrist injury sustained in a crash at Barber Motorsports Park. The fact he was out of a car for Long Beach and the Grand Prix of Indianapolis owed to financial reasons but also served as a wakeup call that he needed to improve off the back of several ragged races to open the season. The speed was there for the Indianapolis 500 but the result wasn’t, with a first-lap crash and the following debacle of a doubleheader weekend at Detroit a week later ultimately Karam’s nadir.

Luckily for the 20-year-old, he had Dario Franchitti as a tutor, mentor and coach, and a post-Detroit “come to Jesus” meeting might have been the biggest impetus for change. Karam then surged in the second half of the year – primarily on ovals – and worked his way into the headlines courtesy of his driving and take-no-prisoners aggressive approach, particularly with Ed Carpenter at Iowa. In a single sentence, he was worth the price of admission almost on his own while also putting himself in contention for series “black hat” status.

Karam was on track for what would have been a dream weekend at home in Pocono, leading with 20 laps to go, when he lost control and crashed out – the debris from the car ultimately striking Justin Wilson’s helmet. It was a tragic end to the race but it was no fault of Karam’s that what happened, happened.

For as much as the community is rallying around Wilson’s family, it needs to do the same for Karam. At 20, he’s a talented driver with a bright future ahead of him, who continued to mature over the course of the season. You just don’t want Pocono to be the race that affects him psychologically, and prevents him from fully realizing his undoubted potential.

IndyCar 2015 Driver Review: Stefano Coletti

Stefano Coletti
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MotorSportsTalk continues its look through the 2015 Verizon IndyCar Series driver-by-driver lineup. In 19th place and the second-ranked rookie this season, was KV Racing Technology’s Stefano Coletti.

Stefano Coletti, No. 4 KV Racing Technology Chevrolet

  • 2014: GP2
  • 2015: 19th Place, Best Finish 8th, Best Start 8th, 0 Top-5, 1 Top-10, 0 Laps Led, 18.9 Avg. Start, 18.6 Avg. Finish

Coletti struggled in his rookie season, which was a bit surprising after an impressive preseason testing period that helped him secure the second KV Racing Technology car alongside KVSH Racing lead driver Sebastien Bourdais.

The GP2 graduate produced early season excitement where he was a passing star, but that only seemed to deceive for the rest of the year. The only time he started ahead of Bourdais was at Iowa, when Bourdais crashed in qualifying.

Similar to other drivers KV has had in previous years Coletti was often hard on equipment, with a frequent number of either full-on accidents or less damaging spins, although not all were his fault. A trouble-free weekend for him rarely occurred, and eighth at the Grand Prix of Indianapolis marked his only top-10 result of the year.

It was a year that paled in comparison to Sebastian Saavedra’s difficult 2014, which paled in comparison to Simona de Silvestro in 2013, which… well you get the point. The lack of consistency for the team’s second car probably doesn’t help, but Coletti offered few moments of brilliance in a deep field where he needed to stand out.

Given the resources at his disposal, ending 78 points behind rookie-of-the-year Gabby Chaves seemed a fairly substantial margin. If he returns for 2016, he has a big jump to make.