AUTO-PRIX-SIN-F1

Dominant Vettel goes wire-to-wire under the lights in Singapore

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Sebastian Vettel has won the Singapore Grand Prix in emphatic style after dominating the entire weekend and bouncing back from a safety car period to win the race by over thirty seconds.

Having stormed into an early lead, Vettel was forced to regroup after a safety car period eradicated the gap he had created. However, the defending world champion lived up to his credentials by setting down a remarkable pace to win the race with ease. Fernando Alonso and Kimi Raikkonen managed to take advantage of the safety car’s appearance to finish second and third respectively as Mercedes and Mark Webber struggled to recover their pre-safety car positions, missing out on the podium.

The start saw Nico Rosberg make a fantastic getaway, going side-by-side with Vettel heading into turn one and outbraking his compatriot to move into the lead. However, it lasted a matter of seconds as the Mercedes ran wide heading into turn two to hand the position back to Vettel, with Alonso tailing the pair having made a superb start from P7. Lewis Hamilton could not match the pace of his teammate early on, dropping to seventh and wrangling with Felipe Massa for position. Sergio Perez also enjoyed a good start, making up four places on the first lap including a fine pass on compatriot Esteban Gutierrez. However, Daniel Ricciardo and Valtteri Bottas both dropped back, with the latter falling behind Caterham’s Giedo van der Garde.

At the front, Vettel was told to look after his tires in anticipation of a safety car, given that there has been one at every single Singapore Grand Prix held. Teammate Mark Webber was hounded for P4 by Romain Grosjean as the front runners began to spread out. Having suffered from back pain during qualifying, Kimi Raikkonen required a valiant drive to fight his way back into the points, but he opted to stop early along with Gutierrez. The rest of the field chose to bide its time, coming in a few laps later with varying choices of tire. A few chose to run on the faster super-softs, with the majority on the longer-lasting mediums. Having jumped him at the start, Alonso remained ahead of Webber after the first round of stops, whilst Grosjean elected to buck the trend and took on a fresh set of super-softs in an attempt to pass the battle ahead. Vettel went deeper into the race than his rivals, re-emerging in the lead ahead of Rosberg and a long-running Paul di Resta who had battled brilliantly to work his way up to P3 before stopping on lap twenty.

Having been stuck behind di Resta, Alonso lost the chance to undercut Rosberg for P2 and soon found himself being caught by Webber and Grosjean behind. However, their charge was soon halted by a safety car after Daniel Ricciardo put his Toro Rosso into the wall at turn seventeen. Not only did this bunch the field, but it also sparked a flurry of pit stops as drivers looked to take on fresh rubber. This left Vettel leading from Rosberg, Webber and Hamilton, but Alonso in P5 had far fresher tires and looked to rectify his race following the stoppage.

Off the restart, Vettel quickly set about re-opening the gap to Nico Rosberg in P2, for once being told by his engineer to push as much as possible. He duly responded, lapping between one and two seconds per lap quicker than the rest of the field. A problem with Grosjean’s car forced the Frenchman to pit for a third time from sixth, dropping to last when he eventually came back out again, but he could only complete a further four laps before retiring from the race. van der Garde’s fine drive continued at the expense of Bottas once again, passing him for P16 not long after the safety car had come back in. At the front, Vettel’s charge continued as his lead swelled to over twenty seconds while Rosberg suffered from a lack of grip due to some rubber lodged in his front wing.

As his teammate steamed ahead in P1, Webber pitted for a second time on lap forty-one, taking on a fresh set of mediums that would see him through to the end of the race. With Rosberg pitting one lap later, Webber was able to undercut his rival perfectly, leapfrogging the Mercedes driver to give Red Bull a chance of a one-two finish. Hamilton could not do anything to intervene, with a slow stop seeing him fall behind Webber and his teammate. A poor stop from Ferrari allowed di Resta to get the jump on Massa, whilst it was plain sailing for Vettel in the pits, with the German driver taking on super-soft tires just in case of a late safety car.

This round of stops played into the hands of those who pitted under the safety car. Alonso, Button, Raikkonen, Perez, Hulkenberg and Gutierrez all looked to go to the end of the race. The young Mexican found himself being hounded by Webber, Rosberg and Hamilton, with all three drivers finding a way through before being followed by di Resta and Massa to drop the Sauber out of the points. Button and Raikkonen became embroiled in a battle for the final podium position, with the Finn’s back problems subsiding in time for the race, and he pulled off a remarkable overtake around the outside of turn four to move onto the podium. The Webber-Rosberg-Hamilton train continued to power through the field, picking off Hulkenberg and then Perez. Their charge was nearly halted when Paul di Resta ended his race in the wall with five laps remaining, but Webber rallied to find a way past Button for fourth, subsequently setting his sights on Raikkonen. However, he was given the call to short-shift, ending all hopes of having two Red Bulls on the podium. He then lost out to Rosberg and Hamilton because of the issue late on, before eventually pulling over and retiring from the race.

At the front, Vettel refused to back off, setting a relentless pace even in the dying stages of the grand prix to take the checkered flag by over thirty seconds, having led every lap and set the fastest lap of the race. Alonso and Raikkonen completed the podium thanks to some good strategic work, but with Vettel clinching a third successive win and extending his championship lead to sixty points, the German driver looks to be en route to a fourth straight title.

NextEV wraps up private testing ahead of third Formula E season

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The NextEV Formula E Team has completed its private testing program ahead of the collective sessions at Donington Park next month in the run-up to season three of the all-electric series.

NextEV endured a difficult second season that saw it lack the pace to allow Nelson Piquet Jr. to defend the inaugural Formula E title he won with the team in season one.

Despite making significant progress across the course of the season under the guidance of CEO Martin Leach, NextEV was unable to avoid finishing at the foot of the teams’ championship.

Plans for season three have been moving swiftly for many months, with Leach telling NBC Sports earlier this month that things were going the right way during testing.

“Everything is on plan,” Leach said.

“When you’re going through a whole new development as we are, you’re constantly trying to identify issues and resolve issues.

“Everything is on-track so far.”

On Friday, NextEV issued a statement announcing it had completed its private testing program ahead of the new season, with 11 days’ worth of running under its belt at Calafat in Spain.

“We have been working incredibly hard for some time now on our new car for the 2016/17 season and have our sights firmly set on arriving in Hong Kong very well prepared and with a well-tested car,” Leach said.

“There are some interesting developments for next season, one of which is the increased regeneration levels, and so these technical upgrades have been a part of the work.

“We have been encouraged by our reliability and our programme progress is exactly in line with our planning.

“We look forward to getting on track at Donington for some comparison work against the other teams and to further cementing our strong pre-season testing work and performance.”

NextEV is yet to confirm its line-up for season three, but Leach told NBC Sports that the team has agreements in principle with season two drivers Piquet and Oliver Turvey, both of whom have expressed a desire to remain with the team.

“We have an agreement in principle. The physical contracts are not signed yet, but I don’t anticipate that being a problem,” Leach said.

“So we’re just going through some of the minutiae at the moment. My plan is to stay with Nelson and Oliver if I can.”

The third Formula E season kicks off in Hong Kong on October 9, with collective testing starting at Donington Park at the end of August.

Sirotkin beats Gasly to GP2 pole in Germany

2016 GP2 Series Round 7
Hockenheimring, Hockenheim, Germany
Friday 29 July 2016.
Sergey Sirotkin (RUS, ART Grand Prix) 
Photo: Sam Bloxham/GP2 Series Media Service.
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Sergey Sirotkin continued his mid-season revival by scoring pole position for Saturday’s GP2 Series feature race at Hockenheim.

Sirotkin picked up his first win of the season in Hungary last Sunday, rising to eighth place in the drivers’ championship in the process after a luckless start to the year.

Red Bull junior driver Pierre Gasly enjoyed the upper-hand for much of the qualifying session, setting two laps good enough for pole before returning to the pit lane and getting out of his car, believing he had done all he could.

As a result, the Frenchman was left unable to respond when Sirotkin put in a lap of 1:22.193, going one-hundredth of a second faster to snatch away pole for ART Grand Prix.

“It is the first time I’ve been to the track, so I didn’t have much expectation before we came here, and free practice didn’t go super good so you’re thinking more about getting a top three than getting a pole,” Sirotkin said.

“The first set of tires was pretty good but we were missing a bit of time to Pierre at that moment, but with every lap on the track I felt better and better, so we were quite confident for the second run.

“Unfortunately there was a bit of a mess on the warm up to the first push, so I just stopped pushing, did a cool lap, and the last lap I knew most of the people would not be as quick and I just pushed like crazy.

“I think I just squeezed everything I could from the situation. Probably we were not simply the quickest car, but we made it by putting it all together perfectly, every inch.”

Raffaele Marciello qualified third for Russian Time ahead of Prema’s Antonio Giovinazzi, while Oliver Rowland bounced back from a disastrous weekend in Hungary to qualify fifth.

Alex Lynn will start sixth for DAMS on Saturday ahead of Norman Nato and Nicholas Latifi. Jordan King and Marvin Kirchhofer rounded out the top 10 for Racing Engineering and Carlin respectively.

Saturday’s GP2 feature race is live on the NBC Sports app and online at f1stream.nbcsports.com from 9:40am ET on Saturday.

FIA to use three-strike rule for Turn 1 track limits at Hockenheim

HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY - JULY 29:  Sergio Perez of Mexico drives the 1 Sahara Force India F1 Team VJM09 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo during practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Germany at Hockenheimring on July 29, 2016 in Hockenheim, Germany.  (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)
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FIA race director Charlie Whiting has informed all Formula 1 teams that a three-strike rule will be used when policing track limits at Turn 1 during this weekend’s German Grand Prix.

The FIA installed a timing loop at two corners for last weekend’s Hungarian Grand Prix to police track limits more effectively, giving drivers three warnings before being penalized for running wide and gaining an advantage.

A similar loop was put at Turn 1 during the build day at Hockenheim ahead of the German Grand Prix, but a request was made for greater leniency when it comes to track limits during the F1 Strategy Group meeting in Geneva on Thursday.

However, after track limits were deemed to have been exceeded 93 times during FP1 alone at Hockenheim – 14 of which Max Verstappen was responsible for – a note has been sent to teams saying that the three-strike rule will be re-introduced.

“During P1 many drivers appeared to make little or no effort to stay on the track on the exit of turn 1, in fact, one driver left the track 14 times,” Whiting’s note read.

“Therefore, for P2 and P3 any driver who is judged to have left the track three times at turn 1 will be reported to the stewards for not having made every reasonable effort to use the track.

“However, if we are satisfied that a driver left the track at this point for reasons beyond his control such a crossing will not be counted towards his total in the session.”

The clampdown on track limits means that times may be deleted during qualifying on Saturday afternoon, as was seen at Silverstone when Lewis Hamilton ran wide on his first lap that was quick enough for pole.

F1 qualifying to be red flagged if double waved yellows are shown

MONTE-CARLO, MONACO - MAY 28: A marshal waves the red flag during qualifying for the Monaco Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit de Monaco on May 28, 2016 in Monte-Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Formula 1 race director Charlie Whiting has confirmed that qualifying sessions will now be red flagged in the event of double waved yellow flags being shown following the saga surrounding Nico Rosberg’s pole lap in Hungary.

Double waved yellows were shown at the end of Q3 in Hungary last weekend after Fernando Alonso spun, forcing a number of drivers to abandon their final qualifying laps.

Rosberg was one of the last to come through the yellow flag zone, lifting slightly through Turn 8 before posting a quicker time to take pole position.

The stewards investigated Rosberg’s lap, and although they were satisfied that he slowed sufficiently, the fall-out from the case has continued ahead of this weekend’s German Grand Prix.

On Thursday, Lewis Hamilton told NBCSN that the case set a precedent for all other drivers when it comes to reacting to double waved yellow flags, fearing that it could cause a safety issue in the future.

However, there will be no repeat of Rosberg’s actions in Hungary, with Whiting confirming on Friday in a press briefing that the red flag will now be shown to prevent drivers from improving their lap times.

“Ever since we had the Virtual Safety Car in 2015 and then this year we use it in free practice,” Whiting said.

“We can use it in qualifying really but we tend now to stop if there is going to be a yellow flag for any length of time.

“The reason we didn’t show a red flag in Hungary was simply that session had ended, but some cars were behind Alonso’s car and some in front.

“So I think the procedure would be to red flag any time there is a double waved yellow flag. Then there will be no discussion.

“That’s what I intend to do in the future, just to remove any discussion about whether a driver slowed down or not.”