Race fan or not, Ron Howard’s ‘Rush’ is a must-see


Ron Howard’s F1 movie Rush, which tells the story of James Hunt and Niki Lauda’s rivalry in 1976, was always going to ask two major questions of racing fans.

First, whether the racing scenes would deliver action and authenticity in equal measure. And second, whether it could keep you on the edge of your seat despite the likelihood that you know from the start how it ends.

As far as the racing action goes they’ve done a superb job – though not totally a successful one. The cars look stunning and sound like the end of the world – the howling Ferrari V12 grabs you by the throat through cinema speakers.

The action is superbly realized, particularly in the case of Lauda’s crash, which is re-enacted in terrifying detail. The downside is that some of the old tracks are not perfectly recreated. But you have to give credit to Howard and his production team for what they were able to achieve with a less-than-blockbuster budget.

The story is retold a rapid pace, yet even though it breaks the two-hour mark some details had to be omitted – the first-lap crash and Hunt’s disqualification at Brands Hatch being a notable example.

But scriptwriter Peter Morgan has made some judicious choices about what to leave out and what to keep in, creating a taut, gripping story which ticks the boxes marked ‘glamour’, ‘action’ and ‘sex’ (the last one is checked several times thanks to Hunt’s infamous exploits).

MORE: Check out “Rush: Inside Racing’s Greatest Rivalry”, the free eBook available for iPad

Chris Hemsworth makes a smoldering Hunt but it’s Daniel Bruhl who steals the show as the brusque, lovably unlovable Lauda. If there’s one important thing the film makers get right it’s the fundamental respect which lies beneath the rivalry between the pair, while avoiding the Hollywood impulse to pigeonhole them as ‘good guy’ and ‘bad guy.

Rush is not a pedantically accurate re-telling of the 1976 season – we have video reviews and documentaries for that. It is an energetic and thoroughly enjoyable movie which F1 fans and motor racing illiterates can both enjoy.

Sainz airlifted to hospital following practice crash

xxxx during final practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on October 10, 2015 in Sochi, Russia.
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Carlos Sainz Jr. has been airlifted to hospital after a big crash during the final free practice session for the Russian Grand Prix on Saturday morning.

Under braking at turn 13, Sainz lost the backend of his Toro Rosso car, causing him to hit the left-hand wall before slamming into the TecPro barrier at the end of the run-off area.

The session was immediately red flagged as medical crews tended to Sainz, taking 20 minutes to extricate him from the Toro Rosso car due to how it had pitched under the barrier.

FIA media delegate Matteo Bonciani told reporters: “The driver is conscious and is still in the process of being extricated. When we know something, we will let you know.”

After being extricated from the car, Sainz was taken away on a stretcher before being placed in an ambulance, giving a thumbs up to let fans know that he was okay. He is also reported to have been talking to doctors in the medical centre after the crash.

Sainz has now been airlifted to hospital for further checks, and is set to miss qualifying later today, with Toro Rosso team boss Franz Tost telling BBC Sport: “To sit him in the car immediately seems a bit risky, but we will wait and see.”

The damage caused to the TecPro barrier has also caused the planned GP3 race to be cancelled, giving the track workers time to carry out repairs ahead of the F1 qualifying session later today.

Qualifying for the Russian Grand Prix is live on NBCSN and Live Extra from 8am ET on Saturday.

Rosberg tops shortened FP3 in Russia after Sainz crash

SOCHI, RUSSIA - OCTOBER 09:  Nico Rosberg of Germany and Mercedes GP drives during practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on October 9, 2015 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)
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Nico Rosberg set the pace in final practice for the Russian Grand Prix on Saturday morning as the session was called early following a heavy crash for Toro Rosso driver Carlos Sainz Jr.

With 25 minutes remaining, the session was stopped when Sainz slammed into the wall at turn 13, pitching in under the TecPro barrier at the fastest point of the circuit.

A loss of power on the car meant that Toro Rosso could not make contact with its driver, causing concern as the medical crew was sent to the crash site to tend to Sainz.

Replays showed that Spaniard lost the back-end of his car under braking coming into turn 13, causing him to hit the wall on the left-hand side of the track before travelling down the track and into the wall at the end of the high-speed straight.

After being extricated from the car, Sainz was shown on TV cameras to be moving around on a stretcher, giving a thumbs up before being placed into an ambulance.

“The driver is conscious and is still in the process of being extricated,” FIA media chief Matteo Bonciani told reporters. “When we know something, we will let you know.”

Toro Rosso team boss Franz Tost added: “As far as I am informed, he is conscious. He is now with the doctor. I think that he is so far okay.”

With qualifying for the Russian Grand Prix due to start in just two hours’ time, it is unlikely that Sainz will be able to take part in the session, with Tost believing it to be “too risky”.

The amount of damage caused to the barrier could also result in delays across the course of Saturday’s running, with GP3 scheduled to race before the F1 qualifying session. The early sunset in Sochi could also cause problems towards the end of the day.