Race fan or not, Ron Howard’s ‘Rush’ is a must-see

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Ron Howard’s F1 movie Rush, which tells the story of James Hunt and Niki Lauda’s rivalry in 1976, was always going to ask two major questions of racing fans.

First, whether the racing scenes would deliver action and authenticity in equal measure. And second, whether it could keep you on the edge of your seat despite the likelihood that you know from the start how it ends.

As far as the racing action goes they’ve done a superb job – though not totally a successful one. The cars look stunning and sound like the end of the world – the howling Ferrari V12 grabs you by the throat through cinema speakers.

The action is superbly realized, particularly in the case of Lauda’s crash, which is re-enacted in terrifying detail. The downside is that some of the old tracks are not perfectly recreated. But you have to give credit to Howard and his production team for what they were able to achieve with a less-than-blockbuster budget.

The story is retold a rapid pace, yet even though it breaks the two-hour mark some details had to be omitted – the first-lap crash and Hunt’s disqualification at Brands Hatch being a notable example.

But scriptwriter Peter Morgan has made some judicious choices about what to leave out and what to keep in, creating a taut, gripping story which ticks the boxes marked ‘glamour’, ‘action’ and ‘sex’ (the last one is checked several times thanks to Hunt’s infamous exploits).

MORE: Check out “Rush: Inside Racing’s Greatest Rivalry”, the free eBook available for iPad

Chris Hemsworth makes a smoldering Hunt but it’s Daniel Bruhl who steals the show as the brusque, lovably unlovable Lauda. If there’s one important thing the film makers get right it’s the fundamental respect which lies beneath the rivalry between the pair, while avoiding the Hollywood impulse to pigeonhole them as ‘good guy’ and ‘bad guy.

Rush is not a pedantically accurate re-telling of the 1976 season – we have video reviews and documentaries for that. It is an energetic and thoroughly enjoyable movie which F1 fans and motor racing illiterates can both enjoy.

Takuma Sato’s likeness revealed on Borg-Warner Trophy (PHOTOS)

Photos; Walt Kuhn
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INDIANAPOLIS – Rather than the traditional December unveil, this year’s reveal newest likeness added to the Borg-Warner Trophy came Tuesday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum.

Takuma Sato got to see the result of the sculpting done by William Behrends and then turned from wax, clay and ceramic into sterling silver on Tuesday evening, as the winner of the 101st Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil saw his face revealed on the trophy.

Sato took the No. 26 Ruoff Home Mortgage Honda for Andretti Autosport to the win in thrilling fashion this year over Helio Castroneves, denying the Brazilian his fourth Indianapolis 500 victory in the process. It atoned for his near-miss in 2012, driving for Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing, the team he’ll return to in 2018.

It’s been a whirlwind last week-plus for Sato, doing the podium interviews at the Japanese Grand Prix, reflecting on his Indianapolis 500 triumph, then sharing the victory spoils with another Japanese pilot in Yoshihide Muroya, who won the Red Bull Air Race World Championship at Indianapolis this weekend.

Photos of Sato’s face on the most unique trophy in sports are below. This post will be updated following tonight’s full unveil. (All photos: Walt Kuhn)