Will Power avenges Fontana heartbreak of one year ago, wins IndyCar finale (VIDEO)

2 Comments

One year ago, Auto Club Speedway broke Will Power’s heart. But in tonight’s IndyCar Series season finale at the two-mile oval in Southern California, the Team Penske pilot got his payback.

Power dominated the middle stages of the MAV TV 500 and then rocketed to the front with the laps winding down. He would go on to claim what he called “the most satisfying win of [his] life” by 1.5 seconds over defending race champion Ed Carpenter.

Early in last year’s IndyCar finale at ACS, Power lost control of his No. 12 Verizon Team Penske Chevrolet and slammed into the wall, opening the door for Ryan Hunter-Reay to overtake him for the series championship by the end of the 500-mile race.

But on this night, Power got to experience the jubilation he had hoped to enjoy last fall in Fontana.

“That is the most satisfying thing I have ever done, and I wanted to do it so badly all year,” Power told NBCSN’s Jon Beekhuis in Victory Lane. “In the early [oval races] I was kind of conservative and wanted to finish every lap. But this time, I was going for it.”

Along the way, Power also had to deal with getting a new visor on his helmet in the middle of a caution period. But Power believed that he had the car to make the ground back up.

“I knew we had a very quick car, and I didn’t care – I just said, ‘Let’s fix this. We can win this,'” said Power. “This is just the most satisfying thing. I’m so stoked for [sponsor] Verizon and it’s a great way to end the season.”

With 20 laps left, Sebastien Bourdais hit the wall going down the backstretch to bring out a caution period. One lap later, Power decided to go to the pits for service in preparation of the last dash to the finish.

Charlie Kimball and J.R. Hildebrand were both ahead of Power when the green came back out with 14 laps remaining, but Power quickly dusted both Hondas to take the lead once again.

Shortly afterwards, the yellow re-emerged as Kimball’s motor let go and Hildebrand came to a stop with an apparent mechanical failure. When the race went back to green with eight laps left, Power pulled away and left Carpenter and Tony Kanaan to duke it out for the runner-up spot, a battle Carpenter would eventually take.

Power finished the 2013 IndyCar season on a high note, notching three victories in the final five races (Sonoma, Race 2 at Houston, and tonight’s triumph in Fontana).

As for Carpenter, he once again showed why he’s perhaps the top oval pilot in the IndyCar paddock, putting up a steady runner-up that marks his best result and third Top-5 of the year. He has now finished either first or second in the last three-season ending races.

Meanwhile, as Power was putting the finishing touches on a victory he’ll clearly cherish for some time to come, Scott Dixon was locking up his third career IndyCar Series championship with a fifth-place finish. Dixon finished just one spot ahead of his title rival, Helio Castroneves, but the Brazilian fell one lap down toward the end of the race; Dixon wound up earning the title by a 27-point margin.

Red Bull Air Race: Yoshi Muroya joins Sato as Japanese champs at Indy

Photo: Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Content Pool
Leave a comment

Takuma Sato isn’t the only major Japanese athlete to take home top honors at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway this year. Countryman Yoshihide Muroya joined him in that on Sunday after winning Red Bull Air Race at IMS, and the Red Bull Air Race World Championship in the process.

Fittingly, the 101st Indianapolis 500 champion was there on site to join him in the celebration.

Muroya flew with a track-record run in the final and erased the four-point deficit to points leader Martin Sonka. The record run came after a disappointing qualifying effort of 11th in the 14-pilot field in the Master Class.

A day after the win, Muroya joined Sato in heading to Sato’s new Verizon IndyCar Series team, Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing’s, Indianapolis-based shop.

A few social posts from Muroya’s victory and the subsequent celebration are below.

CHECKING OUT EACH OTHER’S RIDES

ASTLES BREAKS THOUGH AS WELL

Muroya wasn’t alone among big winners at the Speedway. In the Challenger Class, Melanie Astles of France became the first woman to win a major race at IMS, and is the first female winner in the Red Bull Air Race World Championship.

Nine women have competed in the Indianapolis 500 (Janet Guthrie, Lyn St. James, Sarah Fisher, Danica Patrick, Milka Duno, Simona de Silvestro, Pippa Mann, Ana Beatriz, Katherine Legge) and Mann is the first woman to have been on the pole position at IMS, having done so for the Freedom 100 in 2010 in Indy Lights.

Photo: Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Content Pool