FP2: View from the ground in Austin

Leave a comment

Rather than doing your traditional “Sebastian Vettel was fastest” post-session report – my colleague Luke Smith has that covered – I spent most of the 90-minute second free practice session roaming the grounds here at Circuit of the Americas to get a gauge on the atmosphere and the sensory overload of Formula One here at the circuit. A few thoughts to follow:

SPEED AND BRAKING

Although I’ve followed Formula One since the mid-1990s, I’ve only been to one prior Grand Prix on site, and that was eight years ago. So of all the things that you witness on the ground, the speed and transition to braking has to be the most surreal.

Standing at the end of the longest straight on the circuit, where Lewis Hamilton made his race-winning, albeit DRS-assisted pass on Sebastian Vettel last year, your jaw just drops as the cars decelerate from, according to Brembo, north of 190 mph down to 55 in 125 meters. The stopping power on an F1 chassis is just incredible – especially compared to an IndyCar, even though it also has carbon brakes.

The speed drop looks less severe as the cars head up the hill into Turn 1, aided by the huge elevation change that helps to slow the cars down. More intriguing there is the launch out of Turn 1 into Turn 2, as the steep downhill drop is an underrated part of this course.

DIRECTION CHANGE

I was here for the FIA World Endurance Championship and American Le Mans Series sports car doubleheader weekend in September as just a fan, and through the esses, the Audi, Toyota and HPD prototypes inhaling the GT cars were also surreal to watch. They looked like sharks chasing goldfish if I’m honest, to give you an idea of the speed differential.

Yet watching an F1 car go through the same section two months later, the prototypes look the smaller fish from an optics standpoint. An F1 car hits its turn-in points with laser precision, and it doesn’t even look real how fast the car changes directions. The fans obviously noticed too – I’d reckon there were more in the Turns 2 to 7 section just today than there were in total on Friday in September.

ELEVATION

I touched on this briefly in the first bit but yes, the climb up Turn 1 and the fall back down Turn 2 is more severe in person than it appears on television. Other areas of the track – the tail end of the esses, the dip through the back straight and the dive down from Turns 19 to 20 are also sizeable, but not as much as the first two corners. The elevation poses a true challenge for engineers on the pit wall and drivers alike as they negotiate the 3.4-mile circuit.

FAN FERVOR

There’s a diverse mix of fans on the ground, as you’d expect. Track president Jason Dial told me yesterday to expect fans from all 50 states and 40-plus countries on hand for the race. There’s a multicolored festival of team hats, humorous anti-other-championships shirts (the “BORING” signage over the NASCAR logo colors is a classic) and a genuine buzz in the air.

If there were ticket issues for fans, it didn’t appear as such from the turnout on the ground today. You’d have to think there was an easy 60,000 or so judging by the grandstands in Turns 1, 4, 11, and 15 plus all the ones on the ground.

CELEBRITY PRESENCE

It wouldn’t be America without some level of celebrity. NBCSN pit reporter and insider Will Buxton – whose “Buxton’s Big Time Bash” last night was a rousing success to raise money for Meals on Wheels – spoke with former Friends star Matt LeBlanc in the paddock today. There’s likely going to be more of these vignettes to come.

Hartley happy with ‘big progression’ on first day with Toro Rosso

Getty Images
Leave a comment

With 69 laps completed (28 in free practice one and 41 in free practice two) and respectable lap times in both sessions, Brendon Hartley quickly acclimated to a modern day Formula 1 chassis in his first run with Scuderia Toro Rosso in Friday practice for the United States Grand Prix.

The Porsche factory driver has been drafted into the team following a convoluted series of musical chairs that sees Daniil Kvyat back after a two-race absence, Carlos Sainz Jr. now at Renault and Pierre Gasly racing at the Super Formula season finale in Suzuka.

Over the time in the car today, Hartley experienced changeable conditions in FP1 before a more normal FP2, and discovered the new F1 cockpit after a day learning in the garage yesterday.

“A steep learning curve today! It all went pretty smoothly and I kept the car on track without making too many mistakes, so I’m quite happy,” the New Zealander reflected at day’s end.

“I didn’t really know what to expect from today because I just had so much to learn! I think I made quite a big progression throughout the day.

“The biggest difference from what I’m used to is the high-speed grip, it’s incredible here in Formula 1…it was quite an eye-opener! Another challenge are the tires, which are also quite different to what I’m used to. On the other hand, the long-run looks quite positive and I did a good job managing the tires there – the biggest thing I need to work on now is the new tire pace, and I’ll get another crack at it tomorrow morning before qualifying.

“All in all, I’d say it’s all coming together. We’ll now work hard and go through plenty of data tonight and hopefully I’ll make another step forward tomorrow.”

His best lap was 1.1 seconds up on Friday driver Sean Gelael, the Indonesian Formula 2 driver, in FP1 (1:39.267 to 1:40.406, good enough for 14th) and 1.1 seconds off the returning Kvyat in FP2 (1:37.987 to 1:36.761, good enough for 17th). Interestingly, the Gelael/Hartley combination in FP1 marked the second time in three races that Toro Rosso had a pair of drivers in its cars without a single Grand Prix start between them – Gasly’s debut at Malaysia was the other, when he and Gelael were in in FP1.

Coming into Friday’s running, Hartley said he was more ready for this opportunity now than he had been as a teenager. He admitted he’d called Red Bull’s Helmut Marko in the wake of Porsche’s LMP1 withdrawal news earlier this year to say he was game for any chance that might come.

“I’m a lot stronger than I was back then, basically. I wasn’t ready at 18 years old. I like to think I’m ready now,” he said.

“I haven’t driven a single-seater since 2012, but I like to think that Porsche LMP1 has hopefully prepared me well.”

As for the rest of his weekend, it’s been made more complicated by Hartley being assessed a 25-spot grid penalty, even though Hartley had done nothing to accrue the penalties.

The roundabout sequence of driver changes at Toro Rosso saw Gasly replace Kvyat, Kvyat replace Sainz, and now Hartley replace Gasly, as is outlined by NBCSN pit reporter Will Buxton below.