Why some teams chose a two-stop race during US Grand Prix

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By no means a classic, Sunday U.S. Grand Prix was all about controlling lap times to achieve strategic objectives.

Pirelli opted to bring the hardest two compounds in their 2013 range to Texas. Combined with a track surface that’s not too abrasive, that meant that the fastest way from lights to flag was always going to be a one-stop race, as it was last year.

Degradation of the tires was relatively low overall, but teams had to spend Friday and Saturday collecting as much data as possible on both medium and hard compounds, to calculate their optimum race pace and the right point in the Grand Prix to switch between them.

While I suspect everyone set out with the intention of completing just one pitstop, we did see a few opting to make two, in either an attempt to free themselves from early race traffic and run shorter stints in clear air at a faster pace, or because of poor tire management and running out of grip with a handful of laps still to go.

Those that tried to free up their races with two stops did so because they had no real choice. To run for long spells in queues of traffic overheats the car, hurts the tires much more and can lose way too much overall race time. DRS often gives little advantage when a string of cars all benefit from its usage at the same time and on a track that only really has two clear cut overtaking places, being held up like this can frustrate drivers to the point of making mistakes. It’s often more advantageous to abort plan A, even though theoretically quicker, to put your driver onto a different part of the race track with some fresh tires and tell him to go for it.

It’s no surprise that the guys at the front of the field all stuck with their one stop plan and managed to go as deep into the race as possible on the medium compound, to minimize the risk of getting into trouble with the hard compound towards the end. It was a safe, relatively risk free strategy that the front runners were all able to deploy as the field spaced out enough to ease pressure on each of them.

The early safety car of course played right into the hands of those on the one stop race, allowing them three less racing laps with which to take life from their used medium tires.

The main strategic decisions then, came from teams and drivers managing the use of their tires, knowing when to push and when to hold back, when to deploy KERS and when make the switch between compounds. This is where the work from Friday’s practice sessions really paid off and those that had the best understanding were able to be pro-active, whereas those who were caught out by changing conditions, higher fuel loads or race traffic, could do nothing but react.

There were the normal mixture of successes and failures at the Circuit Of The Americas, but one thing that’s become thoroughly normal in recent times is that Sebastian Vettel and his entire Red Bull team got things exactly spot on again.

A great start, laptimes managed to perfection to deliver optimum stint lengths and the guys in the pitlane even managed a new world record pitstop time on the sister car of Mark Webber. All in all, a decent day at the office.

Alonso enjoys maiden Toyota LMP1 test, ends as second-fastest rookie

Adrenal Media
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Fernando Alonso took his first step towards a possible entry to the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2018 by testing an LMP1 car for the first time with Toyota in Bahrain on Sunday.

Two-time Formula 1 world champion Alonso has made no secret of his desire to race at Le Mans, having signed a deal to race in the Rolex 24 at Daytona in January as preparation for a possible entry at the Circuit de la Sarthe.

Toyota confirmed after Saturday’s FIA World Endurance Championship finale in Bahrain that Alonso would be testing its TS050 Hybrid LMP1 car in the traditional rookie test on Sunday.

Alonso was given the car for the bulk of the five-hour test day following an initial shakedown by Sebastien Buemi, completing 113 laps in total – more than any other driver – and posting a best lap time of 1:43.013.

“It was a great day,” Alonso said. “Testing an LMP1 car is always a nice thing for any racing driver because these cars are amazing to drive. They are very consistent throughout a stint which is a positive thing.

“I have wanted to test a car like this for a long time now and today I could achieve that, so I am happy.”

However, Alonso did not finish as the fastest rookie, with that honor instead going to Pietro Fittipaldi, who was the final driver to drive the Porsche 919 Hybrid ahead of the closure of the German marque’s LMP1 program.

Alonso is now set to head back to Europe before a test in United Autosports’ LMP2 car on Tuesday as part of his Daytona preparation, before then returning to the Middle East for the F1 season finale in Abu Dhabi next weekend.