Bahrain GP to become a night race in 2014

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The Bahrain Grand Prix is poised to become the second night race in Formula One next season after the construction of floodlights and their testing at the final round of the World Endurance Championship in the kingdom this weekend.

Bahrain’s suitability to host a grand prix has come into question over the past few years due to civil unrest in the wake of the Arab Spring. The protests proved to be so volatile that the race was cancelled in 2011, but since it has managed to go ahead without too many problems. Nevertheless, with attendance figures dwindling, the organizers have opted to make the grand prix a night race in 2014 to mark the tenth anniversary of the first event in Bahrain.

“This is by far the biggest development project we have ever undertaken at the BIC [Bahrain International Circuit] since the circuit was first built,” chief executive Salman bin Isa al-Khalifa explained. “I believe that there can be no better way for us to mark our tenth anniversary in F1 by demonstrating our long term commitment to the sport through this significant investment.”

With this move, the Bahrain Grand Prix becomes the second night race on the calendar, following in the footsteps of the Singapore Grand Prix. However, the location for the latter makes the night race such a draw, and with the circuit in Bahrain failing to impress many drivers or fans, this may be a last roll of the dice for the organizers to see if F1 can make a splash in the Gulf kingdom.

The lighting will first be used during this weekend’s World Endurance Championship finale at Sakhir which is set to end at 9pm local time. Although this could revitalise Formula One in Bahrain, the organizers have an incredibly tough act to follow from Singapore’s unmitigated success since joining the calendar in 2008.

Audi bids farewell to Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich upon retirement

Audi Sport
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Audi bid farewell to its iconic head of motorsport, Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich, at its end-of-season ‘Race Night’ event in Germany on Friday upon his retirement.

Ullrich took over the reins as Audi’s head of motorsport in 1993 and stayed in the role for 23 years, overseeing its arrival in the prototype class of sports car racing and domination of the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Ullrich stepped down from the position at the end of 2016, handing the reins over to ex-Audi DTM chief Dieter Gass, and attended his final racing event with the German marque at its first works Formula E outing in Hong Kong earlier this month.

Ullrich was honored at the Race Night event on Friday and thanked for his efforts in developing Audi into a force within global motorsport.

“In 566 factory-backed commitments during this period he celebrated 209 victories, 13 of them in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, eleven in the 12-hour race at Sebring and nine in the ‘Petit Le Mans’ at Road Atlanta,” a piece on Ullrich’s tenure for Audi’s website reads.

“31 driver titles in super touring car racing, in the DTM and in the sports prototype category are credited to him. 57 campaigners were Audi factory drivers during Wolfgang Ullrich’s era and he was responsible for 18 new developments of racing cars – an impressive tally.”