Initial upgrades to Indianapolis Motor Speedway approved

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Preliminary plans from Hulman & Co. to invest state funds into upgrades for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway have been approved by the Indiana Motorsports Commission. The ambitious plans focus on three areas: track modifications, fan experience and technology.

In regards to the track, upgrades identified include the installation of an apron for use in the Speedway’s NASCAR events such as the Brickyard 400 (something that Hulman CEO Mark Miles foreshadowed last week in Las Vegas). According to the Speedway, the apron will cost less than $1 million.

Also identified were the refurbishing of catch fencing and the recently-completed repaving and reconfiguration of IMS’ road course in advance of the inaugural Grand Prix of Indianapolis in May of 2014.

Noticeable was the lack of a lighting system around the 2.5-mile oval, which was initially seen as a possibility for the track due to the hot Indiana summers that Brickyard 400 fans must endure annually.

However, the Speedway said in a release that “economic studies showed this $20-million investment did not provide the best return for taxpayers.”

For fan experience, the Speedway has listed many improvements such as more comfortable seating, a bigger number of elevators for better grandstand access and suite renovations. Also on the agenda are a new scoring pylon and video screens, modernized restrooms, and more concession choices.

Technology-wise, the Speedway plans to have wireless access throughout the facility and “state-of-the-art data, video and audio availability” to go with that.

“We started with ideas for improvements that totaled hundreds of millions of dollars, and we’ve reduced our list to a list of potential projects with total spending of about $140 million,” Hulman president and chief administrative officer Jeff Belskus in a statement. “Now we have some difficult decisions ahead to pare the list further before we ask the commission for its approval.”

Additional improvements to IMS beyond the funds managed by the Commission will be included in a master plan that’s set to be released this coming spring.

Earlier this year, legislation was passed by the Indiana state government that created a motorsports investment district around IMS that will help fund the upgrades by collecting sales and income taxes on the property.

The same legislation also created a fund for motorsport-based businesses in Indiana to apply for loans that can help improve their own facilities.

Neuville wins Rally Australia; Ogier takes FIA WRC title

Sebastien Ogier. Photo: Getty Images
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COFFS HARBOUR, Australia (AP) Belgium’s Thierry Neuville won Rally Australia by 22.5 seconds on Sunday as torrential rain added drama to the last day of the last race of the World Rally Championship season.

Neuville entered the final day with an almost 20 second advantage after inheriting the rally lead Saturday when his Hyundai teammate, defending champion Andreas Mikkelsen crashed and was forced to retire for the day.

His lead was halved by Jari-Matti Latvala early Sunday as monsoon-like rain made conditions treacherous on muddy forest stages on the New South Wales coast. The rain stopped on the short Wedding Bells stage where Neuville was almost 5 seconds quicker than his rivals, stretching his lead to 14.7 seconds entering the last stage.

COFFS HARBOUR, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 17: Thierry Neuville of Belgium and Nicolas Gilsoul of Belgium compete in their Hyundai Motorsport WRT Hyundai i20 coupe WRC during Day One of the WRC Australia on November 17, 2017 in COFFS HARBOUR, Australia. (Photo by Massimo Bettiol/Getty Images)

That stage was full of incident. The driver’s door on Neuville’s Hyundai i20 coupe swung open in the middle of the stage and Neuville had to slam it closed as he approached a corner.

Latvala’s Toyota then crashed seconds from the end of the stage, allowing Estonia’s Ott Tanak, in a Ford, to take second place overall and New Zealalnd’s Haydon Paddon, in a Hyundai, to sneak into third.

Sebastian Ogier was fourth after winning the final, power stage but the Frenchman had already clinched his fifth world title before Rally Australia began. Neuville’s win was his fourth of the season, two more than Ogier, and was enough to give him second place in world drivers’ standings for the third time in five years.

Ogier owed his drivers’ title to his consistency: he retired only once and finished no worse than fifth all season.

Neuville admitted the last day was touch and go as the rain made some stages perilous, forcing the cancellation of the second to last stage.

“That was a hell of a ride,” Neuville said. “Really, really tricky conditions.

“I kept the car on the road but it was close sometimes. I knew I could make a difference but I had to be clever. You lose grip, you lose control and the car doesn’t respond to your input.”