F1 Grand Prix of Brazil - Race

New F1 rules announced Monday create more questions than answers

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It’s obvious Sebastian Vettel and Red Bull Racing’s dominance of Formula One over the last few years has now triggered the FIA to make some changes. While most F1 fans can agree changes are needed, it’s the kind of changes being implemented that are rather stupefying at first read-through.

With history as a guide, we look back to the last time such a sweeping range of changes was implemented, during the last reign of a dominant German at the head of the field: Michael Schumacher and Ferrari. And the changes made a decade or less ago have, in some respects, led to the sweeping changes announced on Monday.

It was in 2003, after the pair had wrapped up the titles in July the year previous, and made a mockery of the sport with team order use on two occasions (Austria and Indianapolis), that F1 put in a new points system for 2003. The 10-6-4-3-2-1 – which looks better with rose-tinted glasses each day compared to further ones – was dropped for a new one, 10-8-6-5-4-3-2-1, that paid points down to eighth. Meanwhile, single car qualifying was added to replace the 12-lap, post three or four fliers, one-hour sessions of years past.

Schumacher still won out on the strength of six victories to Kimi Raikkonen’s one, but only by two points at year’s end. The single-car qualifying, meanwhile, meant you had provisional polesitters after one day that meant nothing in the grand scheme of things. Because Jos Verstappen had been quickest after running last on a drying track on Friday, he ran last on Saturday but would slot into his usual grid spot of 19th anyway while in his Minardi.

Come 2005, Schumacher had put in another banner year the season previous with 13 wins and could make either two, three or four stops to win, and he still did. So the rulemakers set out to delay him again. Aggregate qualifying was introduced for two days of single-lap running in an effort to improve qualifying, but mercifully it was dropped after just a handful of races.

During the races, meanwhile, drivers now had to race on a single set of tires for the entire race, and it spiced up the action. Schumacher and Ferrari’s dominance on the Bridgestones in years past was wiped out as Michelin, despite its Indianapolis fiasco, offered a better performing tire for the duration while Bridgestone was sent to the woodshed by contrast. Fernando Alonso and Renault emerged as F1’s new kings, and Schumacher was dethroned for the first time in six years.

The long-term result of that decision was that eventually tire changes came back into play, Michelin withdrew, and we’ve entered an era of spec tires in F1 once more. The qualifying systems from 2003 to 2005 were so forgettable but brought us the knockout system, first introduced in 2006, that remains the highlight of most Grand Prix weekends.

This all brings us, conveniently, to the present. Bridgestone developed tires over the next five years from 2006 through 2010 that were in essence, too good. Tire strategy was no longer a major part of the race because Bridgestone made tires that held up for such long periods; that even with two different compounds, you had the occasional one-stop, dreary processional race even then. But because Red Bull had not yet mastered the chassis-to-tire balance, as they have with Pirelli, you had several teams and drivers still in contention down to the wire in Abu Dhabi.

The last three years, of course, have seen drastically altered measures – many would argue gimmicks – to attempt to spice up the racing. DRS has, frankly in this writer’s opinion, run its course. After three years, passing arguably has been made easier and less exciting because drivers are too busy playing the DRS game of “am I or am I not within one second, do I need to be ahead on this corner or hang behind instead” instead of bothering to set up for precise, targeted passes that take laps to complete. There’s a reason you remember Kimi Raikkonen and Mark Webber passing at Eau Rouge, for instance, as opposed to any DRS pass of note.

Pirelli, meanwhile, can’t seem to win either way. The Bridgestones were so durable that Pirelli were told to make tires that went off – which they did, but at a seriously compromised and quick rate. The spate of tire failures that occurred at Silverstone this year meant Pirelli would have to change its construction midseason to be more conservative. The new ones suited the Red Bulls best, and ho hum, Vettel and Red Bull haven’t lost since Anthony Weiner was a daily punch line and John Oliver was having a field day with it filling in for Jon Stewart on The Daily Show.

The 2014 season was always going to be a year of sweeping changes anyway, with new eco-friendly V6 engines, KERS being implemented into the power units, lower noses, “penalty points” and a five-engine season limit all among those getting put into practice. Fair enough; that’s enough there to force you to read and memorize the rulebook.

But the steps introduced Monday – double points at the Abu Dhabi season finale, permanent driver numbers, a cost cap for 2015 and five-second penalties – all seem to miss the point. It seems the FIA has suggested these rather than fix the fundamental problem that F1’s product at the moment is often too uninteresting as it is, without even allowing the new 2014 changes to bear themselves out before putting these four ideas into practice.

The double points idea is ludicrous, plain and simple. At no time in F1’s 60-plus year history has any one race ever carried more points prestige than another. Whether it’s Abu Dhabi or Monaco misses the point. For any one race to have a greater championship impact than another negates the other 18 races as a result. It almost makes you want to see someone wrap up the title with a lead of more than 50 points going into Abu Dhabi anyway, so they don’t lose it on a fluke.

The permanent numbers? If F1 really wants to recapture its past, perhaps a return to the iconic team numbers, Ferrari 27/28, Williams 5/6, McLaren 7/8, Lotus 11/12, Mercedes (nee Tyrrell) 3/4, what have you, would have been a better step. No one associates F1 drivers with any car number and to build the brand awareness takes time; it’s not going to make a permanent impact in one year.

The cost cap? This almost brought F1 to civil war a half decade ago and further details are needed before I could make a truly qualified comment on this one. As for the five-second penalties, that’s probably the most sensible of the lot.

But all of the four won’t do anything against the more underlying factors of keeping F1 races interesting past the start of the race. Drivers should be able to push full stop if they want on a set of tires, regulations be damned. It’s why the Spanish Grand Prix this year carried so much intrigue; Alonso pushed and made four stops but still won over those who opted to run more conservatively to save time in pit lane.

F1 has always stood for technological innovation, drivers pushing at the maximum at all times, the build-up to a pass, the iconic sounds of Ferrari V12s or screaming V10s, and consistency in its points system. Regulation changes that come closer to recapturing those ideals, rather than the ones put forth on Monday, could do more to keep F1 on the right track.

Shirley Muldowney surgery update: ‘Couldn’t have gone much better’

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Even though she hasn’t raced since 2003, Shirley Muldowney still has scores of fans.

And many of them, when they heard the news that she would undergo surgery today to remove her right lung due to Stage 2 lung cancer, offered prayers and well wishes on this site, as well as on social media.

Well, even though details are slim, it appears that a five-hour surgery Wednesday morning was a success for the 75-year-old, three-time NHRA Top Fuel champion and one-time AHRA champ.

Muldowney’s agent, Rob Geiger tweeted updates earlier this evening that is great news:

We plan on keeping Muldowney fans updated with more information in the coming days as she begins her recovery.

As Geiger said, “#ShirleyStrong.”

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MRTI: Freedom 100, new USF-17 launch highlight Indy oval weekend

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Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
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INDIANAPOLIS – The Mazda Road to Indy has a double dip of content this weekend with the Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway oval and the Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires and Cooper Tires USF2000 Championship Powered by Mazda at the Lucas Oil Raceway short oval in Clermont, Ind., outside Indianapolis.

Both events are on Friday; the Freedom 100 airs at noon ET and local time as part of NBCSN’s Carb Day coverage. Kevin Lee, Anders Krohn and Katie Hargitt will have the call for the Freedom.

The Freedom 100 is arguably the marquee race of the year for Indy Lights, and a good springboard to the Verizon IndyCar Series – no less than 24 of the 33 starters in this year’s Indianapolis 500 field have some degree of Mazda Road to Indy experience.

That being said, the randomness of the Freedom 100 has produced a variety of winners who haven’t exactly gone on to huge things in IndyCar.

Here’s the past winners list:

  • 2015: Jack Harvey
  • 2014: Gabby Chaves
  • 2013: Peter Dempsey
  • 2012: Esteban Guerrieri
  • 2011: Josef Newgarden
  • 2010: Wade Cunningham
  • 2009: Wade Cunningham
  • 2008: Dillon Battistini
  • 2007: Alex Lloyd
  • 2006: Wade Cunningham
  • 2005: Jaime Camara
  • 2004: Thiago Medeiros
  • 2003: Ed Carpenter

That’s three past winners in Carpenter, Newgarden and Chaves who are racing on Sunday. Harvey, Dempsey and Guerrieri have a combined zero starts; meanwhile all of Cunningham, Battistini, Camara and Medeiros had less than a season of in IndyCar.

Polesitters have been random too, with some surprises including Ethan Ringel (last year) and Ken Losch (2007) of note.

Traditionally Schmidt Peterson Motorsports has fielded strong entries at the Speedway, and that puts any of its four cars – talented sophomore RC Enerson, Pro Mazda champion Santiago Urrutia and fellow rookies Andre Negrao and Heamin Choi into contention almost from the off. Enerson, in particular, is due his first win of the year after niggling turbo issues have hampered most of his season.

Belardi Auto Racing, given its engineering strength in depth, is also a strong contender and a winner here twice previously in dramatic fashion with Chaves and Dempsey. This year they have Zach Veach, who topped the 200-mph mark during testing on Monday, and Felix Rosenqvist, who will look for a significantly better second oval start than his first at Phoenix.

Either of Enerson and Veach would make it seven winners in eight races this year. The other six thus far are, in order, Felix Serralles, Rosenqvist, Kyle Kaiser, Ed Jones, Urrutia and Dean Stoneman.

Kaiser expects to be better than both he and the Juncos Racing team were here last year. Another potential surprise is Neil Alberico, who was strong in testing despite a slight incident in the first session.

Choi, replacing Scott Anderson, is the only driver change among the 16 entered for the Freedom 100. It’s the biggest field for this race since 2012, when 18 cars started – only 11 have started each of the last three years.

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Rendering: Andersen Promotions

Arguably the more intriguing part of the weekend from the Pro Mazda or USF2000 perspective is the launch of the new Tatuus USF-17 car, which gets unveiled Friday morning, 9 a.m., at IMS.

It’s the second new car to be unveiled at IMS in recent years, with the Dallara IL-15 Mazda having been unveiled in May 2014 ahead of its race debut for 20115.

The Pro Mazda and USF2000 races occur later in the day on Friday at IMS.

In Pro Mazda, the question is whether anyone can stop the Pato O’Ward roll of awesomeness for Team Pelfrey. The young Mexican has won five of six races to date, although teammate Aaron Telitz is a past winner at Lucas Oil Raceway in USF2000. The remaining six drivers in the field will look to end O’Ward’s run of form.

USF2000 sees its field temporarily cut in half for its lone oval race of the season, down from 27 cars entered at the Angie’s List Grand Prix of Indianapolis weekend to a mere 14 cars on the 0.686-mile oval.

While Cape Motorsports with Wayne Taylor Racing and Pabst Racing have three cars entered apiece – Parker Thompson and Anthony Martin have propelled Cape to four straight wins this year -known oval setup ace John Walko will likely have Victor Franzoni’s car ready to go to contend.

Driver helmets looking very stylish for Sunday‘s Indianapolis 500

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If it’s spring and time for the Indianapolis 500, the best-dressed man and woman are sporting the newest fashions – on their heads, that is.

There’s a number of fascinating liveries on helmets for this year’s race. Some are tribute liveries, some homages to the race itself and some just switched up for the sake of it.

Here’s some of the more interesting helmets drivers will be wearing in the 100th running of the Indy 500 this Sunday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

 

It’s a dog’s life: While ‘dad’ Simon is away, Norman Pagenaud will play

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Current Verizon IndyCar Series points leader Simon Pagenaud — who comes into Sunday’s 100th running of the Indianapolis 500 riding a three-race winning streak — has a new addition to the family: Norman Pagenaud.

The newest Pagenaud already has his own Twitter account and while ‘dad’ was in Detroit Tuesday during the annual NASCAR cross-country media tour day, Norman REALLY got to know his new home away from home: Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Check out some of Norman’s best tweets of the day, as well as a few from Simon.

Oh, and did we mention that Norman is a puppy? He’s sooooooo cute!

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